Author Topic: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?  (Read 105841 times)

Offline zodiacchris

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #380 on: 07/20/2022 07:45 pm »
I agree, the ongoing crew swap leaves a really funny taste in the mouth. When the last Astronaut came down in Kasachstan we were wondering if the Russians would detain him, and now we’re doing it again? American missiles are killing Russians and the Russians are indiscriminately killing civilians, including children, in their beds, in shopping centres and their hospitals. Pregnant women, toddlers…

Things out in the real world are grim and we’re playing crew swaps to mitigate some residual risk for crews? Are any of the American Astronauts still on reserve status with the Air Force or Navy? Anybody willing to carry that extra risk? To save the USA from looking like a bunch of wilting, spineless bureaucrats?

By all means, save the ISS, let the Russians do their thing in their section, wrap themselves in all the bloody flags they like, by all means cooperate where absolutely necessary to keep the station functioning. But for crying out loud, cut out everything that is not absolutely essential, including this dismal crew swap…

Realpolitik is a German word, we wouldn’t collaborate with Hitler, why do we with Putin?
« Last Edit: 07/21/2022 03:31 pm by zodiacchris »

Offline rubicondsrv

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #381 on: 07/20/2022 08:20 pm »


Realpolitik is a German word, we wouldn’t collaborate with Hitler, we do we with Putin?


We allied with stalin in that war, and still do business with china.


Offline Eagandale4114

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Offline TomH

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« Last Edit: 07/26/2022 05:16 pm by TomH »

Online edzieba

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #384 on: 07/27/2022 09:12 am »
Since the threats of pulling out of the ISS have been a regular occurrence since 2014 (after sanctions due to the invasion of Crimea) and have continued to not come about, this is less a "Russia will leave the ISS at some indeterminate time after 2024" and more "Russia commits to not leaving between 2022 and 2024".

Offline Proponent

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #385 on: 07/27/2022 04:53 pm »
Maybe the threats are a bit more real now that Roskosmos no longer earns hard cash for flying US personnel?

Online zubenelgenubi

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #386 on: 08/04/2022 08:09 pm »
Cross-post; from today's Crew-5 managers' press conference:
Sergei Krikalev, during Q&A, explicitly said that "after 2024" could mean 2025, 2028, or 2030, that the decision would be based on technical reasons.  He expressed a concern that information had been lost in translation.

I thought it was a helpful and artful answer. :)
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Offline AS_501

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Re: Can the ISS survive the Russian invasion of Ukraine?
« Reply #387 on: 08/05/2022 09:10 pm »
Cross-post; from today's Crew-5 managers' press conference:
Sergei Krikalev, during Q&A, explicitly said that "after 2024" could mean 2025, 2028, or 2030, that the decision would be based on technical reasons.  He expressed a concern that information had been lost in translation.

I thought it was a helpful and artful answer. :)

I wish Krikalev was head of Roscosmos.  He made many friends in NASA during the Shuttle program.
Launches/Scrubs attended:  Apollo 11, ASTP*, STS-31**, STS-41G, STS-125, EFT-1 (*@KSC, not Baikonur! **scrub)
Notable Spacecraft Observed:  Echo 1, Skylab/S-II, Salyuts 6&7, Mir Core/Complete, HST, ISS Zarya/Present, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis, Dragon Demo-2, Starlink G4-14 (8 hrs. post-launch)

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