Author Topic: Diversification in Sounding Rockets  (Read 3304 times)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« on: 01/05/2021 10:09 pm »
Sorry I think NSF can use another suborbital topic. I think also the suborbital launch market is growing, so let's start with a list; of new suborbital launch systems in early operation or development.
UP Aerospace SpaceLoft XL and Skyder
Masten Xodiac and Xogdor
Blue Origin New Sheperd
Virgin Galactic Spaceship 2
General Orbit GO launcher/X-60A
Exos Aerospace SARGE
Interstallar Technologies MOMO
Equatorial Space Dorado
DLR MoRaBa/Bayern Chemie Red Kite
IAE/DLR MoRaBA VS-50 and VLM
PLD Space Miura 1
Venture Orbital Systems Boreal Zephyr
Sirius Space Services Sirius 1
Skyrora Skylark L and Skyhy
HyImpulse SR75
Nammo Nucleus (NEO/XL) and NorthStar
SpaceForest Perun
Łukasiewicz Research Network:  ILR-33 Amber 2K
SmallSpark Space Systems; Forst Micro
T-minus Engineering Dart, Dart XL and Barracuda

I'm very likely missing a lot of new suborbital launchers in development (partially on purpose). So please post other suborbital launchers in development.

Edit to add legacy stages: (space capable systems, >100km)
NGIS: Oriole (GEM-22) [TALOS II / Castor IB]
Magellan Aerospace: BlackBrant V mkIV (26KS20000) and Nihka (17KS12000)
ISAS (Japan): S-310; S-520 & SS-520
Avibras (Brazil: IAE/DCTA): S30, S31 (& S40 / S44, S50)
Mil.surplus: Hawk=Orion (M22/M112); SM-2ER booster=Terrier (mk.12/mk,70); SM-2 sustainer=Lynx (mk.104). ; RIM-8 TALOS (mk.11); Patriot Pac.2=Imp. Malemute (TX-486-1)
« Last Edit: 05/08/2022 02:39 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Online ccdengr

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #1 on: 01/05/2021 10:11 pm »
UP Aerospace has been flying since 2006, albeit at low flight rates, so I wouldn't call that early operation.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #2 on: 01/05/2021 11:15 pm »
UP Aerospace has been flying since 2006, albeit at low flight rates, so I wouldn't call that early operation.
Okee point taken. I stand corrected, but they are (currently) the smallest sounding rocket used by NASA. UP aerospace started commercialization of suborbital space.

Possibly UP Aerospace is going to get competition from surplus ESSM motors, that can use their payload system.
Another direction I think diversification can take place is larger, Kratos ARAV-C / Talos(II)+Castor.

Another thing I find odd is the fact that there are no sounding rockets using surplus European missile systems. I wonder what ASTER 15 and 30 could bring in capabilities.
« Last Edit: 01/05/2021 11:18 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #3 on: 01/06/2021 06:27 am »
Black Sky Aerospace
https://bsaero.space/

"BSA has a range of Sounding Rockets, capable of flights up to 300km in multistage configurations. With access to a number of launch ranges across Australia and overseas, BSA facilitates payloads for all industries."

T-Minus Engineering
http://www.t-minus.nl/

"The T-Minus DART is a system for fast and low-cost probing of the upper atmosphere. A certain part of the atmosphere is hardly investigated until now. At altitudes between 50 and 120 km, the air density is too low for balloons to float, and too high for satellites to maintain their orbit. Sounding rockets can be used to perform in-situ measurements, but these are usually too expensive for simple and frequent missions."
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #4 on: 01/06/2021 08:19 am »
T-Minus Engineering
http://www.t-minus.nl/

"The T-Minus DART is a system for fast and low-cost probing of the upper atmosphere. A certain part of the atmosphere is hardly investigated until now. At altitudes between 50 and 120 km, the air density is too low for balloons to float, and too high for satellites to maintain their orbit. Sounding rockets can be used to perform in-situ measurements, but these are usually too expensive for simple and frequent missions."

This is one of the companies I left out intentionally, because I think it deserves more attention.
T-minus Engineering is developing multiple systems, all Meteorological Rocket. This are very small rockets just capable of reaching above 100km. They are used to take direct measurements at altitudes between 40 and 200km. (to high for ballons and planes, to low for satellites)
The T-minus Dart has flown two time from Kooniba Test Range. It can become the successor for the Viper IIIA+dart system. (that was the successor of the Arcas and Loki dart systems)
They are also developing a larger rocket, the T-minus Dart XL.
I expect multiple launches of T-minus Engineering rockets for the Grand Challenge Initiative; Mesosphere / Lower Thermosphere (GCI M/LT
« Last Edit: 01/12/2021 11:09 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #5 on: 01/12/2021 07:40 am »
I've left out another one.
The Dutch/New Zealand: Dawn Aerospace mk.II Aurora (and mk.III) rocketplane(s)
The mk.II Aurora can launch a 3U payload to >100km for 150s micro gravity, probing of the atmosphere or hypersonic flight.


« Last Edit: 01/12/2021 11:07 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Fmedici

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #6 on: 01/15/2021 09:33 pm »
Another one left out: bluShift Aerospace (https://www.blushiftaerospace.com/) has been developing at least three different suborbital rockes according to their website (and an orbital launch vehicle), of which the smallest one is expected to have its maiden flight this month.

Online mn

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #7 on: 02/01/2021 01:37 am »
Another one left out: bluShift Aerospace (https://www.blushiftaerospace.com/) has been developing at least three different suborbital rockes according to their website (and an orbital launch vehicle), of which the smallest one is expected to have its maiden flight this month.

And they launched today

https://www.space.com/blushift-aerospace-launches-stardust-biofuel-rocket

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #8 on: 02/01/2021 04:04 am »
Go to 5:37:15 in the video for the launch. You don't see it lift off from the pad, but you do see video from the on-board cameras.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #9 on: 02/01/2021 04:09 am »
Ground view of the launch.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Mammutti

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #10 on: 02/05/2021 02:33 pm »


Quote from: bluShift Aerospace
Liftoff of Stardust 1.0!

Top-down view from the launch tower.

Online TrevorMonty

Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #11 on: 02/06/2021 04:13 pm »
I've left out another one.
The Dutch/New Zealand: Dawn Aerospace mk.II Aurora (and mk.III) rocketplane(s)
The mk.II Aurora can launch a 3U payload to >100km for 150s micro gravity, probing of the atmosphere or hypersonic flight.

They have approval to start test flights of MkII this year on remote south island airfield. Maybe awhile before it reaches suborbital altitudes.

Sent from my SM-G570Y using Tapatalk


Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Diversification in Sounding Rockets
« Reply #12 on: 09/01/2021 09:05 am »
Space Forest is testing their SF1000 N2O-Parafin hybrid rocket motors. Already five tests completed.
This will be used for their SIR/PERUN suborbital rocket.

Quote
IAF Member @SpaceForest2
 Hybrid Rocket Engine SF1000 test No. 4 had many improvements like mass reduction of the combustion chamber, modified injector geometry, stabilization of engine working parameters and more. check out on
https://youtube.com/watch?v=fnWAetWE6jE&t
#IAFMembers
https://twitter.com/iafastro/status/1393128821541556224
« Last Edit: 09/01/2021 09:08 am by Rik ISS-fan »

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