Author Topic: Emirates Mars Mission  (Read 9784 times)

Online Blackstar

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Emirates Mars Mission
« on: 05/10/2015 02:12 AM »
http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2015/05/07/united-arab-emirates-partner-cu-boulder-2021-mars-mission

United Arab Emirates to partner with CU-Boulder on 2021 Mars mission

May 7, 2015

A mission to study dynamic changes in the atmosphere of Mars over days and seasons led by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) involves the University of Colorado Boulder as the leading U.S. scientific-academic partner.

Known as the Emirates Mars Mission, the project is being designed to observe weather phenomena like Martian clouds and dust storms as well as changes in temperature, water vapor and other gases throughout the layers of the atmosphere. The CU-Boulder part of the mission will be undertaken at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP).

The mission will be headquartered at and controlled from the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre in Dubai, which is affiliated with the Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology. According to Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, vice president and prime minister of Dubai, the new Mars probe will be named Hope.

The UAE’s U.S. scientific-academic partners also include the University of California, Berkeley, and Arizona State University.

“We view this as a marvelous partnership and unlike anything the university has ever done before,” said CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip DiStefano. “This mission not only will involve the advancement of important science, it will include a large emphasis on international education, something CU-Boulder is strengthening at a rapid pace.”

Education and outreach efforts are expected to reach thousands of K-12 students, undergraduates and graduate students from around the world, said DiStefano.

Leading the mission are more than 75 Emirati engineers and researchers, a number that is expected to grow to more than 150 by 2020. Mike McGrath, LASP engineering director and project lead at CU-Boulder, said that a team comprised of CU-Boulder faculty, LASP engineering and missions operations staff and university students will contribute to the effort. The mission is still in its early planning stages, said McGrath.

The science objectives include round-the-clock global weather mapping of the Red Planet in order to better understand how surface weather changes the upper Martian atmosphere. Scientists are interested in how and why Mars -- which has gone from a warm, wet planet to a cold, dry planet -- is losing its oxygen and hydrogen into space.

The UAE is a constitutional federation of seven emirates, or principalities: Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Ajman, Umm al-Qaiwain, Ras al-Khaimah and Fujairah.

Faculty, staff and students from all three U.S. universities will work with UAE researchers on mission data analysis, said McGrath.

LASP currently is leading NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission that began orbiting Mars in September 2014 to help scientists better understand the role atmospheric gases played in changing the climate on the planet over the eons. Data from the new UAE-led mission is expected to complement data from MAVEN and other NASA Mars missions.

 

Statements from University of Colorado officials
on the Emirates Mars Mission

“We believe the Emiratis are leading one of the most promising space missions in recent years, with benefits for scientists and students at CU-Boulder, in the UAE, and around the world. We hope, in working together, to create new partners for research and science education on a global scale and to begin to redefine space exploration in an exciting new era.”

                        -- CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano

“CU-Boulder’s participation in the Emirates Mars Mission is a symbol of the talent and expertise that the University of Colorado Boulder brings to Colorado’s global aerospace industry. Taxpayers and CU stakeholders can be proud of this unique and groundbreaking project that will bring jobs, revenue and vital international learning and research experiences for CU-Boulder undergraduate and graduate students.”

                        -- University of Colorado President Bruce Benson

“This project is an exciting expansion of CU-Boulder’s and LASP’s capabilities and marks a key next step in space exploration in the forging of a direct research partnership with the United Arab Emirates. Not only is the aerospace industry watching this project, we can say with confidence that the entire world will be watching.”

                        -- CU-Boulder Provost Russell L. Moore

Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #1 on: 05/10/2015 02:12 AM »


Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #2 on: 05/10/2015 02:14 AM »
http://spacenews.com/uae-positions-2020-mars-probe-as-catalyst-for-a-new-generation-of-arab-scientists-and-engineers/?utm_content=buffer951ae&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

UAE Unveils Science Goals for ‘Hope’ Mars Probe
by Brian Berger — May 6, 2015

The United Arab Emirates’ space agency might only be 10 months old, but it’s already signed multiple agreements with established spacefaring nations and just released this slick video — along with some new details — about its plan to launch the Arab world’s first Mars probe in July 2020.

Offline plutogno

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #3 on: 05/10/2015 06:55 AM »

Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #4 on: 05/10/2015 07:55 PM »
That thread is about the UAE space agency. This is about the science mission. Properly belongs in the science section.

Online Jeff Lerner

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #5 on: 05/10/2015 08:07 PM »
Any idea what the notional launcher in the video is supposed to represent ?

Offline gosnold

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #6 on: 05/11/2015 06:31 PM »
Soyuz? It would let them launch from French Guiana or from Russia.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #7 on: 03/22/2016 07:14 AM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
« Last Edit: 03/22/2016 07:22 AM by Galactic Penguin SST »
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline Arcas

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #8 on: 03/23/2016 09:37 PM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
It seems strange that they would choose a non-commercial rocket. I wonder what benefit they gain from using what I'm assuming is a non-competitively priced rocket over a Russian, Indian, or American one.
The risk I took was calculated, but boy am I bad at math.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #9 on: 03/23/2016 09:40 PM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
It seems strange that they would choose a non-commercial rocket. I wonder what benefit they gain from using what I'm assuming is a non-competitively priced rocket over a Russian, Indian, or American one.

"Commercial" is not the be all and end all of launcher choice.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Arcas

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #10 on: 03/23/2016 09:41 PM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
It seems strange that they would choose a non-commercial rocket. I wonder what benefit they gain from using what I'm assuming is a non-competitively priced rocket over a Russian, Indian, or American one.

"Commercial" is not the be all and end all of launcher choice.
I understand that, but from the fact that H-IIA isn't marketed commercially, I would assume that it costs more than its identically performing commercial counterparts.
The risk I took was calculated, but boy am I bad at math.

Online Kryten

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #11 on: 03/23/2016 09:53 PM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
It seems strange that they would choose a non-commercial rocket. I wonder what benefit they gain from using what I'm assuming is a non-competitively priced rocket over a Russian, Indian, or American one.

"Commercial" is not the be all and end all of launcher choice.
I understand that, but from the fact that H-IIA isn't marketed commercially, I would assume that it costs more than its identically performing commercial counterparts.
H-IIA has been marketed commercially for a few years now, and had a fully commercial launch (Telstar-12V) last year.

Offline Star One

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Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #12 on: 03/23/2016 10:37 PM »
Not much news has made it to NSF, but the UAE has decided to give the ride to space to Japan (MHI).

Hope Mars Mission ‏@HopeMarsMission
The #EmiratesMarsMission team would like to announce the choosing of #MHI as #Hope's launch provider in #2020.

JAXA and the UAE Space Agency has signed a co-operation agreement today too; maybe we will see Japanese instruments on board given that JAXA has no Mars missions in the pipeline?
It seems strange that they would choose a non-commercial rocket. I wonder what benefit they gain from using what I'm assuming is a non-competitively priced rocket over a Russian, Indian, or American one.

"Commercial" is not the be all and end all of launcher choice.
I understand that, but from the fact that H-IIA isn't marketed commercially, I would assume that it costs more than its identically performing commercial counterparts.

We are talking about the Emirates here I doubt cost was first amongst their considerations. Plus this launcher has conducted commercial launches in the past.
« Last Edit: 03/23/2016 10:37 PM by Star One »

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #13 on: 03/23/2016 11:07 PM »
Assumptions here about launch costing, choices of vendors, etc ... are presuming way too much here.

Relationships are what missions like this are about, so stay focused on "who" is doing "what", "when" and "how".

Completely forget tracking "budget".

Offline Archibald

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #14 on: 03/24/2016 01:21 PM »
http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/government/uae-unveils-details-of-uae-mars-mission-1.1505710

Quote
“This probe represents hope for millions of young Arabs looking for a better future. There is no future, no achievement, no life without hope,” Shaikh Mohammad said. “The Emirates Mars Mission will be a great contribution to human knowledge, a milestone for Arab civilisation, and a real investment for future generations.”

Quote
The Emirates Mars Mission will send three important messages, he added.

“The first message is for the world: that Arab civilisation once played a great role in contributing to human knowledge, and will play that role again.”

“The second message is to our Arab brethren: that nothing is impossible, and that we can compete with the greatest of nations in the race for knowledge.”

“The third message is for those who strive to reach the highest of peaks: set no limits to your ambitions, and you can reach even to space.”

Shaikh Mohammad announced that the probe would be called “Hope”, a name chosen after the Arab world was invited to submit suggestions in a public campaign.

This is extremely important in the current context (hints: Brussels, Paris, M. Le Pen and D. Tru..p)

May the space program make a difference ! I'm rooting for this mission.
« Last Edit: 03/24/2016 01:22 PM by Archibald »

Offline savuporo

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #15 on: 04/03/2016 05:41 PM »
Money.cnn.com video 'Inside the UAE's space program' focuses the second part on the mission.

http://money.cnn.com/video/technology/2016/03/02/mbrsc-space-center-uae.cnnmoney/index.html
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Online Kryten

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #16 on: 06/07/2016 06:59 PM »
Passed PDR;
Quote
Jeff Foust ‏@jeff_foust  24m24 minutes ago
Jim Watzin, head of NASA Mars program: was at the recent PDR for the UAE’s Mars orbiter, Hope; they’re making remarkable progress.

Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #17 on: 01/26/2017 04:48 PM »
https://www.zawya.com/mena/en/story/UAE_Mars_mission_on_track_for_2020_launch-ZAWYA20170126065507/

UAE Mars mission on track for 2020 launch

Dubai: The Emirates Mars Mission (EMM) is on track to launch the Hope spacecraft in July 2020 on its seven-month journey to the Red Planet, the mission’s project manager said on Wednesday at the Project Space Forum in Dubai.

Omran Sharaf said: “The mission has been on track so far. We’ve completed the PDR — Preliminary Design Review — and hopefully we’ll hold the CDR [Critical Design Review] soon.”

His comments came during his presentation on ‘How Could the UAE Get to Mars?’ on the second and final day of the forum, held at Dubai World Trade Centre for the first time.

Project Space is held under the patronage of Shaikh Hamdan Bin Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai. Shaikh Hamdan is the chairman of the Mohammad Bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC), organiser of Project Space.
« Last Edit: 01/26/2017 04:48 PM by Blackstar »

Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #18 on: 02/02/2017 04:20 PM »
http://www.khaleejtimes.com/technology/uae-mars-mission-gets-launch-date

UAE Mars mission gets launch date



UAE's unmanned probe, Hope will be launched in July 2020 from Japan, making it the Arab World's first mission to the Red Planet, a senior Space scientist told Khaleej Times.

"We are delighted to launch the UAE's Mars explorer by the Japanese launch vehicle H-IIA from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan in 2020. We are confident that we will accomplish our responsibility, together with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries," said Yuichi Yamaura, Vice President, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

He was speaking on the sidelines of the second day of the Global Space Congress held in the Capital. The two-day forum, held under the patronage of His Highness, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, was attended by more than 600 experts and focused greatly on the future of UAE's Space programme and Mars expeditions.

Yamaura pointed out that the H-IIA rocket model will also launch the satellite, KhalifaSat into Earth's orbit by 2018, which is built entirely by Emirati engineers.

"It will be small satellites 50 kilogram and one cube sat that will be injected into space from JAXA's, international space station, launched by the Japanese rocket and reached into space," he explained.

He also added that UAE and Japan have agreed to have more collaborations in the future.

Jean-Yves Le Gall, President Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and President, International Astronautical Federation, highlighted that the Mars exploration plays a pivotal role as it could add more proof to what he states as a possibility of life on Mars.

"This exploration is very important for three reasons; first is innovation, because we are doing space in very different way to five years ago; second is cooperation, because projects need cooperation - space stations are the biggest cooperative projects between nations; and third key is aspiration, because we need to attract young generations, in my opinion aspiration is the perfect mix between all these key words."

"Aspiration of Mars in particular is important, because we know that life is possible on Mars, and the real question is how such a life exists on Earth, but not on Mars," he added.

The space experts who spoke at the Congress noted they are eager to witness what the UAE will achieve from the mission. They suggested that journey to Mars should not be disregarded after one successful round, as a possibility of human habitation on Mars could very well take place in the near future.
« Last Edit: 02/02/2017 04:31 PM by Blackstar »

Online Blackstar

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Re: Emirates Mars Mission
« Reply #19 on: 02/02/2017 04:21 PM »
http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/government/uae-may-study-viability-of-sending-astronauts-to-space-1.1971157


UAE may study viability of sending astronauts to space
Young minds needed to further space exploration and technology development, experts say
Published: 18:00 January 31, 2017
Gulf News
Samihah Zaman, Staff Reporter
 

Abu Dhabi: The UAE may soon study the viability of sending astronauts to space, a top official said in the capital on Tuesday.

“While it has not been studied yet, sending an astronaut into space would fall within the bounds of our national space policy,” Khalid Al Hashemi, director of space missions at the UAE Space Agency, said.

This would be a further incentive to attract young Emirati minds towards studying Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), one of the main goals of the UAE’s space exploration and investment initiatives, he added.

Al Hashemi was speaking in a panel discussion on the opening day of the Global Space Congress in Abu Dhabi.

Samer Halawi, chief executive officer at mobile satellite phone provider, Thuraya, highlighted the need for young minds to drive innovation in the space sector.
« Last Edit: 02/02/2017 04:28 PM by Blackstar »

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