Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : CSG-2 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 31 January 2022 (23:11 UTC)  (Read 101874 times)

Online Zed_Noir

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The SpaceX webcast folks seems to asleep. The youtube webcast page stated that coverage starting at 7PM ET.  :o  Or 6 hours from now (about 12PM ET).


Offline zubenelgenubi

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SFN Launch Schedule, updated January 27:
CSG-2 launch clarified to 23:11:19 UTC.
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Offline lenny97

The SpaceX webcast folks seems to asleep. The youtube webcast page stated that coverage starting at 7PM ET.  :o  Or 6 hours from now (about 12PM ET).


Fixed.  ;)

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Quote
SpaceX is targeting Thursday, January 27 for launch of the COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation FM2 mission to low Earth orbit from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.


The instantaneous launch window is at 6:11 p.m. EST, or 23:11 UTC, and a back up opportunity is available on Friday, January 28 with the same window. The Falcon 9 first stage booster supporting this mission previously supported the launch of Arabsat-6A and STP-2. After stage separation, Falcon 9 will return to Earth and land on Landing Zone 1 (LZ-1) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.


One half of the fairings supporting this mission previously supported Transporter-1, Transporter-2, and one Starlink mission, and the other half previously supported SAOCOM 1B, Transporter-2, and one Starlink mission.


A live webcast of this mission will begin about 15 minutes prior to liftoff.
this is called cost effectiveness we see that SpaceX is saving their upload internet cost can't. they write the line, "The Falcon 9 first stage booster supporting this mission previously supported the launch of Arabsat-6A and STP-2." I am so shocked a Falcon beast, formerly Falcon Heavy side booster is roaring again in new form as a Falcon 9 after spending about 950 days in storage and conversion.  No reference  of this. they must have written. It must be, "The Falcon 9 first stage booster supporting this mission previously supported the launch of Arabsat-6A and STP-2 as a Falcon Heavy Side booster. They are writing such that those who don't  know Arabsat-6A and STP-2 mission  will trat that it is a Falcon 9 mission. Offah so cost saving lines!!

Offline ZachS09

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Per the mission kit, there are two M-Vac burns leading up to payload separation an hour into the flight.

The typical mass for a COSMO-SkyMed Second Gen satellite is 2,205 kilograms, which should be light enough for both a direct insertion and Stage 1 RTLS.

To add onto that, SAOCOM 1B was 3,000 kilograms and used the very profile I listed in the second paragraph.

What’s the reasoning for the 2-burn profile on this mission?
« Last Edit: 01/27/2022 05:17 pm by ZachS09 »
Liftoff for St. Jude's! Go Dragon, Go Falcon, Godspeed Inspiration4!

Per the mission kit, there are two M-Vac burns leading up to payload separation an hour into the flight.

The typical mass for a COSMO-SkyMed Second Gen satellite is 2,205 kilograms, which should be light enough for both a direct insertion and Stage 1 RTLS.

To add onto that, SAOCOM 1B was 3,000 kilograms and used the very profile I listed in the second paragraph.

What’s the reasoning for the 2-burn profile on this mission?

They will likely be inserting the spacecraft directly into its ~620km orbit. I believe it is more efficient to do 2 burns.
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Online oldAtlas_Eguy

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Per the mission kit, there are two M-Vac burns leading up to payload separation an hour into the flight.

The typical mass for a COSMO-SkyMed Second Gen satellite is 2,205 kilograms, which should be light enough for both a direct insertion and Stage 1 RTLS.

To add onto that, SAOCOM 1B was 3,000 kilograms and used the very profile I listed in the second paragraph.

What’s the reasoning for the 2-burn profile on this mission?

They will likely be inserting the spacecraft directly into its ~620km orbit. I believe it is more efficient to do 2 burns.
Initial orbit is elliptical orbit with an apogee at 620km where the second burn after a coast is made once apogee is reached to circularize at 620km.

Offline SPKirsch

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https://twitter.com/JennyHPhoto/status/1486773893901819906
Quote
Booster 1052 is ready for the lift off of CSG-2 which is set set to launch tonight at 6:11pm ET.

B1052 has completed 2 flights previously, both times being a FH side core.
ArabSat 6A and STP-2.

Kamera: Me for @SuperclusterHQ
https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1486772121690910725
Quote
B1052-3 as it sits at Launch Complex 40 ahead of tonight's CSG-2 launch. This is the first time this core has been used as a Falcon 9 booster and has never seen a water landing.

@NASASpaceflight article: https://nasaspaceflight.com/2022/01/falcon-9-csg-2/
« Last Edit: 01/27/2022 06:05 pm by SPKirsch »

Wow still kept octaves markings amazing

« Last Edit: 01/27/2022 06:35 pm by Chinakpradhan »

Offline soltasto

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"Press kit" capture with OCR

Offline SLEP

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I’m here now off of Phillips Pkwy and it is very windy on the ground

Offline Conexion Espacial

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The weather is bad today, so it is not surprising that there is an attempt to launch tomorrow.https://twitter.com/TrevorMahlmann/status/1486819234881708036
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Offline SLEP

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And now it’s raining

Online Orbiter

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Windy out here at Jetty. At the very least my streak shot tonight doesn't look very promising.
Astronomer & launch photographer

Offline RocketLover0119

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Now under T-38 minutes. Poll for prop load should have occurred by now but no SpX Mission Control stream yet, still pouring at the site.
"The Starship has landed"

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Now under T-38 minutes. Poll for prop load should have occurred by now but no SpX Mission Control stream yet, still pouring at the site.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
https://twitter.com/conexionspacial

Offline RocketLover0119

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T-35 minutes. Prop load should be starting now but still no word from SpaceX.
"The Starship has landed"

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