Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : CSG-2 : CCSFS SLC-40 : 31 January 2022 (23:11 UTC)  (Read 104791 times)

Offline Jim

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Those structures are on the center core not the side boosters. The sides have the conection points for the longerons but the longerons remain on the center core after stage separation and you can see it on the onboard camera views that the side boosters deploy and then the longerons retract against the body of the center core.

Those are called struts.    longerons are structures (longitudinal) that run the length of a fuselage.

Those structures are on the center core not the side boosters. The sides have the conection points for the longerons but the longerons remain on the center core after stage separation and you can see it on the onboard camera views that the side boosters deploy and then the longerons retract against the body of the center core.

Those are called struts.    longerons are structures (longitudinal) that run the length of a fuselage.
so the struts connection points are also removed now??

Offline Rondaz

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It's a clear but chilly morning out at Launch Complex 40 where B1052 is vertical and ready for another launch attempt later today.

Mission: COSMO SkyMed Time: NET 18:11 Eastern @NASASpaceflight overview:

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1487444951856209923

Offline Rondaz

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Think calming thoughts. The current winds are not favorable for a launch much less a landing.

https://twitter.com/julia_bergeron/status/1487476298540855296

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Offline DigitalMan

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We started getting some gusts last night, we are still getting some. Enough to bring down some branches.

Offline Ken the Bin

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New cancel-and-replace NGA notices:

Quote from: NGA
291832Z JAN 22
NAVAREA IV 96/22(11,26,27).
WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC.
STRAITS OF FLORIDA.
OLD BAHAMA CHANNEL.
FLORIDA.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, ROCKET LAUNCHING
   302306Z TO 310004Z JAN, ALTERNATE
   312306Z JAN TO 010004Z FEB
   IN AREAS BOUND BY:
   A. 28-35-48N 080-35-01W, 28-37-00N 080-32-00W,
      28-35-00N 080-21-00W, 28-13-00N 080-09-00W,
      28-10-00N 080-15-00W, 28-10-00N 080-24-00W,
      28-26-43N 080-32-41W.
   B. 26-18-00N 079-22-00W, 26-18-00N 079-20-00W,
      25-29-00N 078-43-00W, 25-01-00N 078-44-00W,
      25-00-00N 078-51-00W, 25-28-00N 079-07-00W.
   C. 23-16-00N 079-31-00W, 23-28-00N 079-31-00W,
      23-38-00N 079-25-00W, 23-44-00N 079-13-00W,
      23-43-00N 079-02-00W, 23-38-00N 078-51-00W,
      23-28-00N 078-45-00W, 23-17-00N 078-45-00W,
      23-07-00N 078-51-00W, 23-01-00N 079-02-00W,
      23-01-00N 079-13-00W, 23-06-00N 079-24-00W.
2. CANCEL NAVAREA IV 93/22.
3. CANCEL THIS MSG 010104Z FEB 22.
Quote from: NGA
291936Z JAN 22
HYDROPAC 248/22(22).
EASTERN SOUTH PACIFIC.
DNC 06.
1. HAZARDOUS OPERATIONS, SPACE DEBRIS
   310041Z TO 310119Z JAN, ALTERNATE
   010041Z TO 010119Z FEB
   IN AREA BOUND BY
   39-10S 119-01W, 28-43S 117-27W,
   16-15S 114-20W, 03-31S 110-37W,
   03-57S 108-14W, 14-34S 108-52W,
   27-04S 111-28W, 39-42S 115-56W.
2. CANCEL HYDROPAC 243/22.
3. CANCEL THIS MSG 010219Z FEB 22.

Offline Ken the Bin

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New L-1 weather forecast.  >90% 'Go' for January 30 and January 31.  All Additional Risk Criteria are Low for both days.

Offline Comga

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The SpaceX webcast page says
“Live in 25 hours January 30 6:10 PM”
Is that a scrub for today?
Is the launch time slipping to 6:10+25=6:25?
That could make for even better viewing.
« Last Edit: 01/29/2022 08:29 pm by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline kdhilliard

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The SpaceX webcast page says
“Live in 25 hours January 30 6:10 PM”
Is that a scrub for today?

SpaceX tweeted out the slip at 13:22 EST "due to weather in Florida affecting pre-launch operations".  See five posts up.

Is the launch time slipping to 6:10+25=6:25?
That could make for even better viewing.

Agreed, 18:25 might have made for even better viewing, but no, T-0 is still at 18:11 EST.  That's just SpaceX's sloppily inconsistent setting of the "going live" time for their webcasts.  Sometimes they set it to T-0 even though they go live 10 to 15 minutes before then.  Sometimes they set it to closer to the actual time they go live.  This time they set it to T-1 minute.  Go figure!


Edited to add that we are again expecting clear skies for the launch attempt.  0% cloud cover predicted for the Cape and a good stretch south, 2 to 4% down in Fort Lauderdale and Miami.  (Source: Weather Underground.)
« Last Edit: 01/29/2022 09:25 pm by kdhilliard »

 
but the base longerons connection are on the side booster's octaweb so anything about that. I showed  it in the 3rd and 4th images and I used the image of a core booster as the last image to signify whose release point on the side booster I am asking
modified and

Those are called struts.    longerons are structures (longitudinal) that run the length of a fuselage.

asking for whether these points I was told to be struts connection points are now removed from booster or not
« Last Edit: 01/30/2022 05:39 am by Chinakpradhan »

Offline soltasto

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Once again, the updated "press kit" capture with OCR

Offline kdhilliard

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Chinakpradhan, your question -- What signs of B1052's previous life as a FH side core are visible in its current incarnation as a F9 single core? -- is an interesting one.  As mentioned above by Alexphysics, its nose cone has been replaced with an interstage, so presumably there won't be any signs up there.  For the lower connections, a good comparison would be with this image from an April 2019 Teslarati article on the Arabsat 6A FH mission booster matings.  Unfortunately, Trevor Mahlmann's CSG-2 photos don't show far enough down on the booster to reveal the connection points which are lower than the landing leg pivot hinges and are obscured by the Transporter Erector.

Offline getitdoneinspace

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A question for those that have seen a RTLS. Sitting now on the beach about a half mile south of Cocoa Beach pier. I was thinking of going to the grass plot near the SpaceX control building, but from where I'm sitting I see BO's launch site clearly and some structures looking north along the Coast. Should I stay where I'm at or go up to Port Canaveral? Here obviously has a  clear view over the ocean whereas the grass plot does not. Thanks to anyone that offers their opinion.

Offline Jim

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A question for those that have seen a RTLS. Sitting now on the beach about a half mile south of Cocoa Beach pier. I was thinking of going to the grass plot near the SpaceX control building, but from where I'm sitting I see BO's launch site clearly and some structures looking north along the Coast. Should I stay where I'm at or go up to Port Canaveral? Here obviously has a  clear view over the ocean whereas the grass plot does not. Thanks to anyone that offers their opinion.

Once the vehicle is above the tree line, it doesn't matter where you are with respect to the ocean.  And if you want to be closer, then seeing the ocean really doesn't matter.

I realized I don't need to see the pad, if I am not going to be close like on base.  I routinely watch from my house in Merritt Island. 

In summary, if you want to be close, get as close as possible.  If you don't want to be close, then a mile or two doesn't make much of a difference in watching the vehicle in flight.
« Last Edit: 01/30/2022 04:57 pm by Jim »

Offline Stan-1967

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How about Jetty Park?

Offline Rocket Rancher

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A question for those that have seen a RTLS. Sitting now on the beach about a half mile south of Cocoa Beach pier. I was thinking of going to the grass plot near the SpaceX control building, but from where I'm sitting I see BO's launch site clearly and some structures looking north along the Coast. Should I stay where I'm at or go up to Port Canaveral? Here obviously has a  clear view over the ocean whereas the grass plot does not. Thanks to anyone that offers their opinion.

It doesn't matter between your 2 choices; but, is this your first launch? Do want the the loudest rumble or just a good view. I have seen a few launches in my day and it never gets old, but I am selective if I'm not out on base. For me with this launch trajectory to the south and a returning booster, I would go north of the Pier but south of the jetties, midway. You will see the vehicle rising once it clears the treeline and fly pass you going south, Then about 8 minutes later you get to see the booster fly back pass you as it lands just on the other side of the BO complex. Best of both worlds in my book. But today I too will be watching from MI.

Offline nalawod

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A question for those that have seen a RTLS. Sitting now on the beach about a half mile south of Cocoa Beach pier. I was thinking of going to the grass plot near the SpaceX control building, but from where I'm sitting I see BO's launch site clearly and some structures looking north along the Coast. Should I stay where I'm at or go up to Port Canaveral? Here obviously has a  clear view over the ocean whereas the grass plot does not. Thanks to anyone that offers their opinion.
I live in Cocoa Beach and have seen RTLS from near and far, from Jetty Park, to boat at sea, to Playalinda Beach. Jetty Park is a bit crowded and too close for my taste. By far my fav view of the RTLS is Cherie Down park, just a little to the south of Jetty Park and not "gate controlled".  You can't see the rocket on the pad and won't see it until it gets about T+ 10 seconds. Very few locations feature a view of the top of the rocket. Cherie Down is close enough to give you great sound and expansive view and very direct view of the landing.  Parking is free but pretty limited so if its full, I'd just park somewhere close and walk out there.
Here's a short vid from the beach the last time I went there:

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Offline ChrisC

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FYI we have a thread specifically about viewing KSC launches here, pinned to top of this section:

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=44657.0

Nalawod, I am crossposting your post there.
« Last Edit: 01/30/2022 08:09 pm by ChrisC »
PSA #1: EST does NOT mean "Eastern Time".  Use "Eastern" or "ET" instead, all year round, and avoid this common error.  Google "EST vs EDT".
PSA #2: It's and its: know the difference and quietly impress grammar pedants.  Google "angry flower its" .

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