Author Topic: Bigger boosters from OSC?  (Read 17126 times)

Offline yinzer

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RE: Bigger boosters from OSC?
« Reply #40 on: 08/04/2007 07:16 PM »
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antonioe - 27/7/2007  1:29 PM

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Analyst - 15/5/2007 4:34 AM

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Skyrocket - 15/5/2007 11:25 AM
because there are not enough customers: Delta II will be no longer economic, when it is used only for a handful of NASA launches.

And a replacement will have more customers? I don't buy this logic.

Analyst

You are quite right: a Delta II replacement probably won't have any more customers than Delta II has today. The trick is to create an affordable medium launch vehicle that can be financially self-sustaining (including recovery of the development costs, recurring costs, fixed costs, etc.) at a rate of 2-3/year. There is no single solution to this problem - you have to do several different things simultaneously.

By the way, the reason we're doing this is the same reason we did Pegasus in 1987: our satellite projects needed such a launch vehicle.  Believe me, developing a successful new launch vehicle is a lot less fun than it looks!...

Are dual-manifested EELV medium flights and Soyuz out of Kourou sufficiently unattractive that you  think there's room for another similarly sized launch vehicle?
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Offline Skyrocket

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RE: Bigger boosters from OSC?
« Reply #41 on: 08/04/2007 07:22 PM »
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yinzer - 4/8/2007  9:16 PM
Are dual-manifested EELV medium flights and Soyuz out of Kourou sufficiently unattractive that you  think there's room for another similarly sized launch vehicle?

Dual manifested missions are often unattractive for science missions, as most missions require their own particular orbits. Sharing the vehicle to a shared orbit leads therefor to compromises in the scientific return. Shared launches are even less attractive for interplanetary missions.

Soyuz (and other non US launch vehicle) can not be procured by NASA and other US gov agencies. The only exceptation is, when a foreign partner provides the launch vehicle (e.g. GRACE, JWST). But generally a US launch vehicle is required for gov missions.


Offline yinzer

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Re: Bigger boosters from OSC?
« Reply #42 on: 08/04/2007 07:37 PM »
Both of those are true, but I wouldn't have expected Orbital's internal satellite projects to be either one-off science missions or interplanetary probes.  ORBCOMM certainly wasn't.
California 2008 - taking rights from people and giving rights to chickens.

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