Author Topic: Flight crew assignments  (Read 575339 times)

Online Chris Bergin

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2295 on: 08/09/2013 08:47 PM »
Oh wow! Legend to us British....


Release:
RELEASE 13-248


Astronaut Michael Foale Leaves NASA After 26-Year Career


NASA astronaut Michael Foale has retired, ending a 26-year space agency career that included 375 days in space during six space shuttle missions and extended stays aboard two space stations.

Foale spent 145 days aboard the Russian space station Mir in 1997 and 194 days aboard the International Space Station as commander of Expedition 8 from October 2003 to April 2004. He also conducted four spacewalks over his NASA career totaling almost 23 hours.

"We salute Mike and his contributions to NASA as an accomplished member of the astronaut corps," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "Starting with his first flight, shuttle mission STS-45, when we flew together in 1992, Mike has worked tirelessly to support NASA's quest to explore the unknown. I know Mike will go on to do more great things as he continues to support the aerospace industry in his new endeavor."

Foale held many positions during his NASA career, including chief of the Astronaut Office Expedition Corps, assistant director (technical) of the agency's Johnson Space Center in Houston, and deputy associate administrator for exploration operations at NASA Headquarters in Washington. He most recently worked in support of Soyuz and International Space Station operations, as well as space station spacewalk activity and spacesuit development.

Foale's future plans include advancing green aviation technology. For Foale's complete NASA biography, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/14gPLKx

For more information about NASA programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

-end-


Online Space Pete

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2296 on: 08/09/2013 09:28 PM »
So that's Mike Foale, Nick Patrick, and Piers Sellers all retired now.

It's all on Tim Peake for the future of Brits in space!
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Online Chris Bergin

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2297 on: 08/12/2013 12:37 AM »
Well it took hours to go through all those L2 Historical images from his missions, but I've written up an article covering Michael Foale's missions, with help from Chris Gebhardt's orbiter mission history overviews:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/08/the-amazing-space-adventures-of-michael-foale/

Offline SMS

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2298 on: 08/12/2013 08:34 AM »
Here is a draft version of future Expedition 38 crew portrait...
---
SMS ;-).

Offline anik

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2299 on: 08/13/2013 12:20 PM »
According to editor of Russian Novosti kosmonavtiki magazine Sergey Shamsutdinov, ISS-46/47 prime crew consists of FE-4 Sergey Zalyotin, FE-5 Timothy Kopra and FE-6 Timothy Peake. Also, Jeffrey Williams will be a backup for Scott Kelly in year-long flight on ISS.
« Last Edit: 08/13/2013 12:28 PM by anik »

Online Chris Bergin

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2300 on: 08/26/2013 02:47 PM »
RELEASE 13-264


Astronaut Gregory H. Johnson Leaves NASA


NASA astronaut Gregory H. Johnson has left the agency, after a 15-year career that included more than 31 days in space, for a position with the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space.

A veteran of two space shuttle flights, Johnson served in 2008 as the pilot of STS-123, a mission vital to the construction of the International Space Station. He followed that up two years later as the pilot of STS-134, the penultimate space shuttle mission.

"Greg contributed greatly to the construction of the International Space Station, and I very much enjoyed my time in orbit with him," said Bob Behnken, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "We are grateful for his service to NASA and wish him well in his new career."

Johnson earned an undergraduate degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Air Force Academy. He later earned graduate degrees from Columbia University and the University of Texas, and served in the U.S. Air Force as a pilot. Johnson flew combat missions during Operations Desert Storm and Southern Watch.

Johnson joined NASA as an astronaut in 1998, and filled many technical roles including capsule communicator for the STS-126, 119, 125 and 127 missions; deputy chief and then chief of the Astronaut Safety Branch; and associate director of external programs at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. Johnson recently led the Astronaut Office's Visiting Vehicle Working Group, which helped plan and execute missions with NASA's commercial partners.

Johnson retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 2009, after more than 25 years of service. He has logged more than 5,000 flight hours in more than 50 different aircraft.

For Johnson's complete biography, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/johnson-gh.html

Online Space Pete

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2301 on: 08/26/2013 06:13 PM »
Col. Gregory H. Johnson Named CASIS Executive Director
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL. (August 26, 2013)

Today, Gregory H. Johnson, Colonel (Ret), was named executive director for the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) – the nonprofit entity selected by NASA to manage the utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory. Col. Johnson will assume his role effective September 1, 2013.

As executive director, Col. Johnson will lead the CASIS organization to identify novel applications and new partnership opportunities advancing use of our nation's orbiting laboratory.

“Col. Johnson’s combination of experience within our nation's space program, leadership skills and familiarity with the aerospace industry make him an ideal fit for CASIS,” said CASIS Board of Directors Chair Dr. France Cordova. “With Col. Johnson's appointment by the Board, a critical role within the organization has been filled. He will drive forward the mission of CASIS, which is to enable and maximize use of the ISS National Laboratory as a unique resource for scientific discovery, technology development and education."

The ISS U.S. National Laboratory is focused on accelerating basic discoveries and innovation in areas that require microgravity and other extreme conditions uniquely provided by space. The facility offers opportunities for basic and applied research in the biological sciences, biotechnology, human health, physical and materials science, Earth and space imaging, and engineering research and development that will both advance our efforts in space and contribute to improving life on our planet.

“It is an honor to accept the role of executive director with CASIS and promote the benefits of conducting research on the ISS,” said incoming CASIS Executive Director Col. Gregory H. Johnson. “To see the strides this organization has made in less than two years of existence is highly encouraging, and I look forward to working alongside the CASIS staff as we continue to enhance the scope of spaceflight research and enable groundbreaking innovations for the benefit of humankind.”

Col. Johnson was selected as a NASA Astronaut in 1998 and ultimately piloted two Space Shuttle missions (STS-123 and STS-134, both aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour) where he spent nearly 32 days in orbit and contributed to the assembly of the ISS. In October 2011, Col. Johnson began a rotational assignment as the associate director of external programs at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. In that role, Col. Johnson managed all public affairs, outreach and educational programs at the Center.

Before NASA, Col. Johnson was a decorated officer and pilot with the United States Air Force. Col. Johnson flew 34 combat missions in support of Operation Desert Storm and 27 missions during Operation Southern Watch. In 1994, he was assigned to the 445th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base, where he flew and tested the F-15C/E, NF-15B and other aircraft. During his nearly 25 years in the U.S. Air Force, Col. Johnson logged over 5,000 flight hours in more than 50 different aircraft.

Col. Johnson received his B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Air Force Academy, his M.S. in flight structures engineering from Columbia University and his M.B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin.

# # #

About CASIS: The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) was selected by NASA in July 2011 to maximize use of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory through 2020. CASIS is dedicated to supporting and accelerating innovations and new discoveries that will enhance the health and wellbeing of humankind and our planet. The CASIS goal is to bring the magic of space down to earth. For more information, visit www.iss-casis.org.

About the ISS National Laboratory: In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation's newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users and advancing STEM education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low earth orbit and varied environments of space. The ISS National Laboratory Office at NASA’s Johnson Space Center currently facilitates research initiatives on board the station’s National Lab, but management of America’s only in-orbit laboratory is transitioning to CASIS.

# # #

http://www.iss-casis.org/NewsEvents/PressReleases/tabid/111/ArticleID/78/ArtMID/586/Col-Gregory-H-Johnson-Named-CASIS-Executive-Director.aspx
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Online Space Pete

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2302 on: 08/28/2013 02:01 PM »
We first reported this back in May, per anik's info on the ISS schedule thread, but now it's official. We were also told privately back in January that Tim Peake had been assigned to this flight, but it is understood that there were objections to him getting the short mission, which is why it went to Denmark (the lowest financial contributor to HSF out of Germany/France/Italy/UK). So, congrats Denmark on your first astronaut, but shame it will only be a short mission.


N° 29–2013: Andreas Mogensen set for Soyuz mission to Space Station in 2015

28 August 2013

ESA's Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen has been assigned to be launched on a Soyuz spacecraft from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in September 2015 for a mission to the International Space Station.

This 10-day mission will be Andreas's first flight into space and the first ever space mission by a Danish astronaut.

The flight is directly connected to the new era in ISS operations: two experienced spacefarers from the USA and Russia will work on the Station for one year from May 2015. During his stay onboard the ISS, he will conduct a series of experiments preparing future missions and testing new technologies.

"I'm happy to announce this mission as this is already the fifth flight assignment for the class recruited in 2009," said Thomas Reiter, ESA’s Director of Human Spaceflight and Operations.

"With first of the new class, Luca Parmitano, currently working on the Space Station, and three other astronauts already training for their imminent missions, ESA's new astronauts are very busy.

“Thanks to the decisions of the Member States at the Ministerial Council last November, we will be able to fulfil our commitment to fly all six newly selected astronauts before the end of 2017,” said Mr Reiter.

"This mission is the fulfilment of a life-long dream and the culmination of many years of hard work and training,” said Andreas Mogensen.

“I am excited to be able to participate in ESA’s outstanding programme of science and technology development on board the International Space Station and I am honoured to represent Denmark and Europe in space. The mission is a unique opportunity for Europe to develop and test the technologies necessary for the future of human space exploration."

New technology and science mission

The launch of the mission will take place on 30 September, 2015 with the launch of Soyuz TMA-18 (44S) and it will end on 10 October, when Andreas will land with Soyuz TMA-16 (42S).

During his flight, Andreas will test novel ways of interaction between the ground and space crews with a mobile device that allows astronauts to operate it hands-free and with several multi-user communication techniques. The system will have also advanced 3D visualisation and augmented reality –features that will be fully exploited with added wearable computers and cameras to allow the general public to follow activities on the ISS 'through the eyes of an ESA astronaut' potentially in real time.

Andreas's short mission is an excellent opportunity for several science studies, particularly in life science. By adding samples and measurements from a short-duration mission astronaut to material gathered and being collected during long-duration missions, the value of the biomedical statistics is increased. All the instrumentation needed for physiology, biology and material science experiments is already available in the Columbus laboratory and samples can be returned quickly back to Earth for further analysis.

A short-duration mission is also perfect for testing a new generation of health sensors, vital measurement devices and electro-muscle-mobility devices. These have direct benefit for future exploration missions and even sooner on Earth, for instance with operators of heavy machinery or with rehabilitation after sports injuries.

Andreas will be specially suited too: he will assess a new ‘skinsuit’ during normal daily activities. This is tight garment made from elastic material mimicking Earth gravity and thus passively mitigating deconditioning of an astronaut’s body during spaceflight.

Along with the Soyuz arrival, the ISS will host up to nine persons for a while – a record that has not been broken since retirement of the Space Shuttle in 2011.

Between Luca's ongoing mission and flight of Andreas in 2015, ESA astronauts Alexander Gerst and Samantha Cristoforetti, are scheduled for launch in 2014 for long-duration missions to the Station. After Andreas, the next European destined for space will be Tim Peake, who will start his long-duration mission on the ISS as a member of the Expedition 46/47 in December 2015.

High-flying engineer

This new technology packed mission will be a dream flight for an aerospace engineer like Andreas. Not only will the mission include many firsts and demonstrations, but also Andreas will fly as the flight engineer in the ‘left seat’ of Soyuz, making him second-in-command of their vehicle.

Andreas was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2 November 1976, and he received a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Imperial College London, UK, in 1999, followed by a doctorate in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas, Austin, USA, in 2007.

He was selected as an ESA astronaut in May 2009 and completed the astronaut basic training programme in November 2010 with the five other astronauts of the 2009 class. Andreas is a qualified Eurocom at the Columbus Control Centre in Munich, where he has been communicating with the astronauts on the International Space Station.

In addition to his training and work activities, Andreas worked for ESA on the Lunar Lander programme at ESTEC, Noordwijk, the Netherlands, where he was involved in the design of the guidance, navigation and control system for a precision lunar landing.

From his homebase at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, Andreas will start his mission training with the partners of the International Space Station. This will take him to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA, and Star City, near Moscow, Russia, as well as Japan and Canada.

Andreas blogs about space exploration and his astronaut training activities in Danish at videnskab.dk/profil/andreas-mogensen.

About the European Space Agency

The European Space Agency (ESA) is Europe’s gateway to space. It is an intergovernmental organisation, created in 1975, with the mission to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space delivers benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world.

ESA has 20 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Den-mark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, of whom 18 are Member States of the EU.

ESA has Cooperation Agreements with eight other Member States of the EU. Canada takes part in some ESA programmes under a Cooperation Agreement.

ESA is also working actively with the EU on implementing the Galileo and Copernicus programmes.

By coordinating the financial and intellectual resources of its members, ESA can undertake programmes and activities far beyond the scope of any single European country.

ESA develops the launchers, spacecraft and ground facilities needed to keep Europe at the forefront of global space activities.

Today, it launches satellites for Earth observation, navigation, telecommunications and astronomy, sends probes to the far reaches of the Solar System and cooperates in the human exploration of space.

http://www.esa.int/For_Media/Press_Releases/Andreas_Mogensen_set_for_Soyuz_mission_to_Space_Station_in_2015
« Last Edit: 08/28/2013 02:09 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline anik

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2303 on: 08/29/2013 02:47 PM »
Gennadiy Padalka will possibly replace Yuriy Lonchakov in ISS Expedition 43/44 crew.

Online ras391

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2304 on: 08/29/2013 02:57 PM »
can you discuss the reason for the possible switch?

Offline anik

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2305 on: 08/29/2013 03:01 PM »
can you discuss the reason for the possible switch?

No.

Online Space Pete

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2306 on: 08/29/2013 03:17 PM »
Gennadiy Padalka will possibly replace Yuriy Lonchakov in ISS Expedition 43/44 crew.

Wow, Gennady flying again, for his fifth long duration mission! Every time I think that man has likely made his last flight, his name appears on yet another manifest. If Gennady were a NASA astronaut, he'd probably be grounded now due to hitting his lifetime orbital radiation absorption limit.
« Last Edit: 08/29/2013 03:17 PM by Space Pete »
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Offline arkaska

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2307 on: 08/29/2013 07:28 PM »
Ohh, looking forward to a possible fifth flight by Padalka. It also means he will be the person with most time spent in space if he joins Expedition 43/44.

Offline npuentes

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2308 on: 08/30/2013 12:24 PM »

Wow, Gennady flying again, for his fifth long duration mission! Every time I think that man has likely made his last flight, his name appears on yet another manifest. If Gennady were a NASA astronaut, he'd probably be grounded now due to hitting his lifetime orbital radiation absorption limit.

So, do the Russians have laxer radiation exposure criteria than other ISS partners? Or, is it just that, for whatever reason, Padalka has less risk? It seems that in the United States, some astronauts are grounded for exposure whereas others are not (e.g., D. Thomas on Exp. 6, being replaced by Pettit). Does family history and health come into play?
« Last Edit: 08/30/2013 12:26 PM by npuentes »

Offline TJL

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2309 on: 09/01/2013 02:53 PM »
Ohh, looking forward to a possible fifth flight by Padalka. It also means he will be the person with most time spent in space if he joins Expedition 43/44.
If his next flight goes 6 months (or so) as scheduled, that will leave him with the most time in space, exceeding the second most experienced (Krikalev) by approximately 100 days...amazing career!

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