Author Topic: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007  (Read 41207 times)

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Mar. 12, 2007

RELEASE: 07-62

SPACECRAFT TO STUDY CLOUDS AT EDGE OF SPACE ARRIVES AT VANDENBERG

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. - NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the
Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft arrived Saturday at Vandenberg Air Force
Base, Calif., for a targeted April 25 launch aboard a Pegasus XL
rocket.

The AIM spacecraft will fly three instruments designed to study polar
mesospheric clouds located at the edge of space, 50 miles above the
Earth's surface in the coldest part of the planet's atmosphere. The
mission's primary goal is to explain why these clouds form and what
has caused them to become brighter and more numerous and appear at
lower latitudes in recent years. AIM's results will provide the basis
for the study of long-term variability in the mesospheric climate and
its relationship to global climate change.

Mating of the three stages of the Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL has been
underway at Vandenberg. The AIM spacecraft now joins the Pegasus
rocket at the facility. AIM will undergo a series of readiness tests
to verify its state of health, and the instruments will be cleaned
and calibrated. Technicians also will partially deploy the craft's
solar arrays for illumination testing.

AIM is scheduled to be mated to the Pegasus XL during the second week
of April, after which final inspections will be conducted.
Approximately one week later, after the test team performs a launch
countdown rehearsal and flight simulation, the payload fairing will
be installed around the spacecraft.

Two days before launch, the Pegasus rocket with the AIM spacecraft
will be transported to the Vandenberg runway where it will be
attached beneath the Orbital Sciences L-1011 carrier aircraft.

NASA's Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., is
managing the AIM launch, and Orbital Sciences Corporation is
conducting launch services.

AIM is the seventh Small Explorers mission under NASA's Explorer
Program. The program provides frequent flight opportunities for
world-class scientific investigations from space within heliophysics
and astrophysics. The Explorers Program Office at Goddard Space
Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., manages this NASA-funded mission. The
Center for Atmospheric Sciences at Hampton University, Hampton, Va.,
leads the mission. The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
at the University of Colorado, Boulder, built two of the spacecraft's
three instruments, manages the mission and will control the satellite
after launch. The Space Dynamics Laboratory of Utah State University,
Logan, built the third instrument. Orbital Sciences Corporation,
Dulles, Va., designed, manufactured and tested the AIM spacecraft.

For more information about NASA and the AIM program, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/aim


-end-

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #1 on: 03/23/2007 02:49 PM »
STATUS REPORT: ELV-032307

EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Mission: AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)
Launch Pad: Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Vehicle: Pegasus XL (Orbital Sciences)
Launch Date: April 25, 2007
Launch Time: 1:26:49 p.m. PDT

Since NASA's AIM spacecraft arrived at Vandenberg Air Force Base,
Calif., on March 10, the prelaunch processing has gone well and is on
schedule. A critical milestone was achieved when technicians
performed a partial deployment of the solar array and successfully
conducted an illumination test. Instrument cleaning and calibration
is currently under way. The spacecraft separation system is scheduled
to be installed this weekend. Mating of the AIM spacecraft to the
Pegasus XL rocket is targeted for April 3.

The mating of the three stages of the Pegasus XL is complete. A flight
simulation successfully tested the launch vehicle, including testing
of the reaction control system pneumatic thrusters. Next week, prior
to mating the AIM spacecraft to the Pegasus XL, the spacecraft will
be electrically connected to the launch vehicle for a flight
simulation. Another flight simulation will be conducted during the
second week of April, after AIM is mechanically mated and
electrically integrated onto the Pegasus rocket.

Online Chris Bergin

RE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #2 on: 03/23/2007 06:18 PM »
This will be a live coverage event. I'm assuming we'll have NASA TV coverage for this?

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8024
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 472
  • Likes Given: 19
RE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #3 on: 03/23/2007 06:28 PM »
Quote
Chris Bergin - 23/3/2007  8:18 PM

This will be a live coverage event. I'm assuming we'll have NASA TV coverage for this?
Yep. If it is a NASA mission, you can count on NASA TV coverage. It's always good to check the NASA TV listing:

April 24, Tuesday
4 p.m. AIM Prelaunch News Conference Vandenberg (Public and Media Channels)
Immediately following - AIM Mission Science Briefing Vandenberg (Public and Media Channels)

April 25, Wednesday
3 5 p.m. AIM Launch Coverage Vandenberg (Public and Media Channels)
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32415
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11154
  • Likes Given: 331
RE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #4 on: 03/23/2007 06:28 PM »
Quote
Chris Bergin - 23/3/2007  3:18 PM

This will be a live coverage event. I'm assuming we'll have NASA TV coverage for this?

yeppers and  the website too

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #5 on: 03/27/2007 03:27 PM »

There's a new gallery dedicated to AIM's processing in KSC Media Gallery: http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=117 Some good images of the Pegasus XL rocket to carry it... maybe some could even be useful for the newly created OSC Q&A thread :)

http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//medium/07pd0656-m.jpg" width="720" border="0" />

http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//medium/07pd0657-m.jpg" width="720" border="0" />

http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//medium/07pd0666-m.jpg" width="720" border="0" />

-DaviD-

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #6 on: 03/30/2007 04:33 PM »
EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Mission: AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)
Launch Pad: Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Vehicle: Pegasus XL (Orbital Sciences)
Launch Date: April 25, 2007
Launch Time: 1:26:49 p.m. PDT

NASA's AIM spacecraft processing continues to go well and is on
schedule. Technicians have completed cleaning and calibrating the
instruments and installed the spacecraft separation system. AIM has
been electrically connected to the Pegasus for integrated testing and
a flight simulation. Actual mating of the spacecraft to the rocket is
planned to begin on or about April 3.

Flight simulation No. 3 is under way with the vehicle and spacecraft
electrically connected. Another flight simulation will be conducted
during the second week of April, after AIM is mechanically mated and
electrically integrated onto the Pegasus rocket. The fairing will
then be installed around the AIM spacecraft.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #7 on: 04/05/2007 04:30 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: M07-36

NASA MEDIA BRIEFING ON MISSION TO STUDY EARTH'S HIGHEST CLOUDS

WASHINGTON - NASA will host a media teleconference on Wednesday, April
11 at 2 p.m. EDT to discuss science objectives of the Aeronomy of Ice
in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission.

AIM is scheduled to launch April 25 from Vandenberg Air Force Base,
Calif., aboard a Pegasus launch vehicle. It will measure high
altitude noctilucent ("night shining") clouds to determine why they
form and vary, which may be linked to climate change.

Briefing participants are:
-- Vicki Elsbernd, AIM Program Executive, NASA Headquarters,
Washington
-- Jim Russell, AIM Principal Investigator, Hampton University,
Hampton, Va.
-- Chris Savinell, AIM mission manager, Goddard Space Flight Center,
Greenbelt, Md.

Reporters should call 1-888-398-6118 and use the pass code "clouds" to
participate in the teleconference. International media should call
1-210-234-0007.

Audio of the teleconference will stream live at:

http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

Supporting images will be posted concurrent with the briefing at:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/aim/AIM_L14_media.html

For more information about the AIM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/aim


-end-

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #8 on: 04/06/2007 04:19 PM »
EXPENDABLE LAUNCH VEHICLE STATUS REPORT

Mission: AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)
Launch Pad: Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Vehicle: Pegasus XL (Orbital Sciences)
Launch Date: April 25, 2007
Launch Time: 1:26:49 p.m. PDT

NASA's AIM spacecraft was mated to the Pegasus XL rocket on Wednesday.
An integrated flight simulation is scheduled for early next week.
Later that week, operations will begin for installation of the
Pegasus fairing around the AIM spacecraft.

The Pegasus rocket with the AIM spacecraft is currently planned to be
installed onto the transporter April 16. The L-1011 carrier aircraft
is slated to arrive at Vandenberg Air Force Base the following day.
Transporting Pegasus/AIM to the runway for mating operations with the
carrier aircraft is scheduled for April 22.


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #9 on: 04/11/2007 03:48 PM »
RELEASE: 07-84

NASA AIMS TO CLEAR UP MYSTERY OF ELUSIVE CLOUDS AT EDGE OF SPACE

WASHINGTON - NASA is preparing to launch the Aeronomy of Ice in the
Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft, the first mission dedicated to
exploration of mysterious ice clouds that dot the edge of space in
Earth's polar regions. These clouds have grown brighter and more
prevalent in recent years and some scientists suggest that changes in
these clouds may be the result of climate change.

The first opportunity for launch is on Wednesday, April 25 from
Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., aboard a Pegasus launch vehicle.

AIM will conduct the first detailed probe of this unusual phenomenon
typically observed approximately 50 miles above the Earth's surface
in the mesosphere. The mesosphere is the region just above the
stratosphere. Researchers know very little about how these polar
mesospheric clouds form, why they are being seen at lower latitudes
than ever before or why they have recently grown brighter and more
frequent.

"These clouds are indicators of conditions in the upper reaches of the
Earth's atmosphere, and are an important link in the chain of
processes that result in the deposition of solar energy into Earth's
atmosphere," said Mary Mellott, AIM program scientist, NASA
Headquarters, Washington. "AIM will provide an understanding of how
and why these clouds form, an important contribution toward the NASA
goals of understanding the fundamental physical processes of our
space environment and how the habitability of planets is affected by
the interaction of planetary magnetic fields and atmospheres with
solar variability."

The clouds are noctilucent, meaning they can be seen from the ground
only at night, when they are illuminated by sunlight no longer
visible from the Earth's surface. The brightest of these clouds are
now known to be primarily composed of water ice. Their seasonal
lifecycle is controlled by complex interactions between temperature,
water vapor, solar activity, atmospheric chemistry and small
particles on which the cloud crystals form. Human-induced factors
such as carbon dioxide cause a warming in the lower atmosphere but a
cooling in the mesosphere.

The clouds form in the coldest part of the Earth's atmosphere at the
summer season in the polar regions. In the northern hemisphere they
begin appearing in mid-May and last through mid-August, in the
southern hemisphere beginning mid-November and lasting through
mid-March.

"The occurrence of these clouds at the edge of space and what causes
them to vary is not understood," said AIM principal investigator
James Russell III, Hampton University, Hampton, Va. "One theory is
that the cloud particles grow on 'seeds' of meteoric dust or dust
lofted up from below. AIM will provide the comprehensive data needed
to test current theories for cloud formation or develop new ones, and
allow researchers to build tools to predict how they will change in
the future."

AIM will be comprised of three instruments: the Solar Occultation for
Ice Experiment; the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size Experiment; and
the Cosmic Dust Experiment. The satellite will simultaneously measure
air pressure and temperature, moisture content and cloud dimensions,
providing data needed to determine the role of polar mesospheric
clouds as an important indicator of the planet's changing climate.

The clouds appear to be a relatively recent phenomenon, first reported
in the late 19th century shortly after the volcanic eruption on the
Indonesian island of Krakatoa. The first daytime observations of the
clouds were made by satellite in 1969. Regular space-based
observations began in 1982 with NASA's Solar Mesosphere Explorer
using instruments primarily designed for other purposes.

"This Small Explorer mission is a good example of the huge science
returns we can get for a relatively small cost investment," said
Vicki Elsbernd, program executive for the AIM mission, NASA
Headquarters.

For more information about NASA and the AIM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/aim

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #10 on: 04/14/2007 09:36 AM »
Mission: AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere)
Launch Pad: Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.
Launch Vehicle: Pegasus XL (Orbital Sciences)
Launch Date: April 25, 2007
Launch Time: 1:26:49 p.m. PDT (4:26:49 p.m. EDT)

NASA's AIM spacecraft was mated to the Pegasus XL rocket on April 4.
An integrated flight simulation was successfully completed earlier
this week. Technicians began operations to install the Pegasus
fairing around the AIM spacecraft, followed by black light inspection
of the fairing and spacecraft. The spacecraft umbilical was
disconnected and re-routed to allow the payload fairing to move into
the clean room.

The Pegasus rocket with the AIM spacecraft is currently planned to be
installed onto the transporter on April 16. The L-1011 carrier
aircraft is slated to arrive at Vandenberg Air Force Base the
following day. The transport of Pegasus/AIM to the runway for mating
operations with the L-1011 is scheduled for April 22.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
Re: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #11 on: 04/17/2007 07:11 PM »
MEDIA ADVISORY: 14-07

NASA SETS PRESS AND MEDIA EVENTS FOR AIM LAUNCH

NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft, is
scheduled to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California by
an Orbital Sciences Pegasus XL vehicle at 1:26 p.m. PDT on April 25
within a launch window that extends from 1:23 to 1:30 p.m. PDT. The
drop point of the Pegasus from the L-1011 carrier aircraft is a
location over the Pacific Ocean approximately 100 miles offshore
west-southwest of Point Sur, Calif. AIM will be launched at an
azimuth of 192.5 degrees into a circular polar orbit of 375 miles
with an inclination of 97.77 degrees.

AIM is a two-year mission to study polar mesospheric clouds. These are
the Earth's highest clouds, which form an icy membrane 50 miles above
the surface at the edge of space. These clouds, which are visible
from the ground with the naked eye, form in the spring and summer at
high latitudes and have been seen for over a century, reflecting the
Sun's light in the twilight sky. The mission's primary goal for the
spacecraft's three instruments is to explain why these clouds form,
and discover what is causing them to appear more frequently and at
lower latitudes.

NASA Kennedy Space Center is responsible for launch vehicle/spacecraft
integration and launch countdown management. NASA Goddard Space
Flight Center is responsible for the overall AIM mission management.
Hampton University in Hampton, Va., is the prime contractor and is
leading the mission, assisted by the University of Colorado and
Virginia Tech. Orbital Sciences Corporation is responsible for
providing the Pegasus XL launch service to NASA.

Prelaunch Press Conference

A prelaunch press conference and mission briefing, to be carried live
on NASA Television, will begin at 1 p.m. PDT (4 p.m. EDT) on April 24
in the conference room of the NASA-KSC Resident Office at Vandenberg
Air Force Base.

Participating in the prelaunch press conference will be:

Vicki Elsbernd, AIM Program Executive
NASA Headquarters, Washington

Omar Baez, NASA Launch Director/NASA Launch Manager
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.

Bryan Baldwin, Pegasus Launch Vehicle Program Director
Orbital Sciences Corporation, McClean, Va.

Mike McGrath, AIM Project Manager
Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics
University of Colorado, Boulder, Co.

Captain Damon Vorhees, Launch Weather Officer, U.S. Air Force
30th Weather Squadron, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.

AIM Mission Science Briefing

An AIM mission briefing will immediately follow the prelaunch press
conference. Participating will be:

Mary Mellott, AIM Program Scientist
NASA Headquarters, Washington

James Russell III, AIM Principal Investigator
Hampton University, Hampton, Va.

Scott Bailey, AIM Deputy Principal Investigator
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Va.

AIM Press Accreditation and Launch Coverage

News media desiring accreditation to cover the prelaunch press
conference and launch of Pegasus/AIM should call the 30th Space Wing
Public Affairs Office at Vandenberg Air Force Base at 805-606-3595.

On April 24, local media desiring to cover the AIM prelaunch press
conference and mission science briefing should meet at the main gate
of Vandenberg Air Force Base on California State Road 1 at 12:20 p.m.
for escort to the NASA Vandenberg Resident Office in Building 840.

On launch day, April 25, media representatives should meet at the
Vandenberg main gate at noon to be escorted to the Vandenberg Air
Force Base runway to view the departure of the L-1011 aircraft. Media
will then be taken to the viewing room of the NASA Mission Director's
Center located at Building 840 on South Vandenberg Air Force Base.
From there, media may follow the flight and launch of Pegasus/AIM.

Assuming a successful flight of the Pegasus, a post-launch news
conference will not be held. However, launch vehicle and spacecraft
representatives will be available afterward to informally answer
questions from the media.

NASA Television Launch Coverage of Pegasus/AIM

Live coverage on NASA Television of the Pegasus/AIM launch will begin
at noon a.m. PDT (3 p.m. EDT) on April 25 and continue through
spacecraft separation from the Pegasus vehicle, which occurs
approximately 10 minutes after launch. Live audio of the launch
coverage and the Pegasus/AIM briefings will be available on the "V
circuits" that may be dialed at 321-867-1220, 1240, 1260, 7135.

In the continental United States, NASA TV is available via satellite
on AMC-6, Transponder 17, C-band, located at 72 degrees West
longitude. The frequency is 4040.0 MHz video, 6.8 MHz audio, MPEG-2
digital signal. In Alaska and Hawaii, NASA TV is available on AMC-7,
Transponder 18, C-band, at 137 degrees West longitude. The frequency
is 4060.0 MHz, also an MPEG-2 digital signal. Polarization is
vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz. A digital integrated
receiver decoder is required; an analog signal is no longer
available.

For NASA TV launch coverage information and schedules on the Internet,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/ntv

Web Prelaunch, Launch and Mission Coverage of Pegasus/AIM

For live launch coverage and AIM mission information, go to the AIM
link on the NASA Portal at:

http://www.nasa.gov/aim

On launch day, the launch blog will be activated beginning at noon
PDT. Real-time updates will be featured as countdown milestones
occur. A launch highlight podcast will be posted at approximately
L+30 minutes.

Pegasus/AIM News Center

The Pegasus/AIM News Center at the NASA Vandenberg Resident Office
will be staffed starting on April 19 and may be reached between 8
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. PDT at 805-605-3051. A recorded status report will
also be available starting April 20 and may be reached by dialing
805-734-2693. The U.S. Air Force 30th Space Wing Public Affairs
office may be reached at 805-606-3595.


-end-

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8024
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 472
  • Likes Given: 19
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #12 on: 04/24/2007 07:27 PM »
*bump*
Today's two AIM press-conferences coming up in about 30 minutes. Then the launch tommorow.
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #13 on: 04/24/2007 08:17 PM »
An interesting fact they mentioned during the conference is that AIM uses magnetic torque bars, instead of RCS thrusters, to control its attitude. These bars create magnetic fields that interact with Earth's, to create forces. They will be first used right after payload separation, to slow AIM's roll.
-DaviD-

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #14 on: 04/24/2007 08:23 PM »
Wow, 0% probability of weather prohibiting launch both tomorrow and the day after! I guess we could live with some more of these forecasts during Shuttle missions ;)
-DaviD-

Offline TitanFan

  • Member
  • Member
  • Posts: 90
  • Vandenberg Village, CA
  • Liked: 13
  • Likes Given: 0
Pegasus AIM question
« Reply #15 on: 04/25/2007 03:39 AM »
With the AIM launch being scheduled for tomorrow (4/25/07), about what day did the L-1011 arrive at Vandenberg?  My first guess would be Friday sometime because I saw a large aircraft inbound to Vandenberg and I was too far away to ID it, but I could be wrong.  Also, what kind of chase plane will more than likely be used?  I believe it was a NASA F/A-18 last time.
TITAN...assured access to space.

Offline John44

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3818
  • Netherlands
    • space-multimedia
  • Liked: 155
  • Likes Given: 0
AIM Mission Briefings
« Reply #16 on: 04/25/2007 04:48 AM »
The Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission will provide the first detailed exploration of Earth's unique and elusive noctilucent or night shining clouds that are found literally on the "edge of space." The satellite is scheduled to launch from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 25, 2007.

AIM Prelaunch News Conference
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1875&Itemid=2

AIM Mission Science Briefing
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1876&Itemid=2

anik note: "Pegasus AIM question" and "AIM Mission Briefings" threads are moved into "LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007" thread

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32415
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11154
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #17 on: 04/25/2007 05:42 PM »
Countdown started hours ago.  Now at T-2:35 hrs

Online Chris Bergin

Historically Black University Leads NASA AIM Mission

NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) is scheduled to launch on Wed., April 25 at 4:26 p.m. EDT from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., via a Pegasus XL launch vehicle. The mission is led by Hampton University, making it the first Historically Black College and University to have the principle investigator and total mission responsibility for a NASA satellite mission.


AIM will study why polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) form and why they vary. These clouds are also called "noctilucent" or night-shining clouds. This is NASA's first mission dedicated to exploration of these unique and mysterious clouds. These clouds are being seen at lower latitudes than ever before, and have recently grown brighter and more frequent, suggesting a connection to global change.


  WHAT:    The launch of NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM)
           mission led by Hampton University will air live at HU.

  WHEN:    Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 4 p.m. EDT

  WHERE:   Phenix Hall Auditorium, 40 East Tyler Street, on the campus of
           Hampton University, Hampton, Va.


Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32415
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11154
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #19 on: 04/25/2007 06:31 PM »
Stargazer engines started

Offline Rob in KC

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 670
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 55
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #20 on: 04/25/2007 06:35 PM »
When does NASA TV coverage begin?

Offline William Graham

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4203
  • Liked: 207
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #21 on: 04/25/2007 06:35 PM »
With Pegasus, is T-0 the time that the aircraft takes off, or the time that the Pegasus is released?

Offline William Graham

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4203
  • Liked: 207
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #22 on: 04/25/2007 06:36 PM »

Quote
Rob in KC - 25/4/2007 6:35 PM When does NASA TV coverage begin?

 

NASA says it will start at 3 pm. I assume this is EDT, so that would be 19:00 GMT.


Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32415
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11154
  • Likes Given: 331

Online Chris Bergin


Online Chris Bergin


Offline William Graham

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4203
  • Liked: 207
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #26 on: 04/25/2007 07:02 PM »
Webcast started. The TriStar is taxying

Offline vt_hokie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3028
  • Hazlet, NJ
  • Liked: 92
  • Likes Given: 227
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #27 on: 04/25/2007 07:03 PM »
Always loved the L-1011!   :)

Online Chris Bergin


Online Chris Bergin

10 mins to Stargazer take off.

Offline Chris SF

  • Regular
  • Member
  • Posts: 73
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #30 on: 04/25/2007 07:18 PM »
From Chris' preview article:

"With all the interest surrounding SpaceX's Falcon I launch vehicle of late, many forget that Pegasus was the world's first privately developed space launch vehicle. Its maiden 1990 mission marked the first all-new, unmanned space launch vehicle developed in the US in more than 20 years.

Other landmarks included the Pegasus being the first winged vehicle to accelerate to eight times the speed of sound, and the first air-launched rocket to place satellites into orbit, using its carrier aircraft as an 'air breathing reusable first stage.'"

Didn't know that!

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #31 on: 04/25/2007 07:21 PM »
Poll for takeoff underway.
-DaviD-

Online Chris Bergin

High quality video for L2 is recording now (will be available pretty much right after conclusion) - will be about 100mb plus. A free video will be recorded too (the launch part).

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #33 on: 04/25/2007 07:28 PM »
L-1011 now airborne!!!  :)

Online Chris Bergin


Online Chris Bergin

Very neat chase plane:

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #36 on: 04/25/2007 07:32 PM »
NASA reconnaissance jet is now airborne too!!!

Offline Lee Jay

  • Elite Veteran
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6683
  • Liked: 982
  • Likes Given: 140
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #37 on: 04/25/2007 07:33 PM »
Anyone have tail numbers?

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #38 on: 04/25/2007 07:35 PM »
Pegasus looking good as it is climbing. It's way too cloudy too see anything unfortunately :(

Online Chris Bergin

AIM Spacecraft:

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #40 on: 04/25/2007 07:39 PM »

How long until Pegasus seperation? :)

Online Chris Bergin

Quote
ShuttleDiscovery - 25/4/2007  8:39 PM


How long until Pegasus seperation? :)

26 minutes past the hour, so about 45 mins or so.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #42 on: 04/25/2007 07:40 PM »
Quote
ShuttleDiscovery - 25/4/2007  3:39 PM


How long until Pegasus seperation? :)

About 40 minutes.
Go Pegasus!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #43 on: 04/25/2007 07:43 PM »
Quote
Nick L. - 25/4/2007  8:40 PM

Quote
ShuttleDiscovery - 25/4/2007  3:39 PM


How long until Pegasus seperation? :)

About 40 minutes.
Go Pegasus!


Thank you. Looking forward to seeing it in space very soon... :)

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #44 on: 04/25/2007 07:43 PM »
Shot of the L-1011 with the Pegasus.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #45 on: 04/25/2007 07:45 PM »
Quote
Nick L. - 25/4/2007  8:43 PM

Shot of the L-1011 with the Pegasus.

You beat me to it! I take it this is from that chase plane? :)

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #46 on: 04/25/2007 07:46 PM »
Close up of the Pegasus

Online Chris Bergin

T-40 mins.

Offline EirikV

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 261
  • Proud L2 member
  • Houston, TX (Rice '13)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 7
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #48 on: 04/25/2007 07:54 PM »
CNN Pipeline is broadcasting the live coverage in Pipe 2.

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #49 on: 04/25/2007 07:55 PM »
The very delicate procedure of the Pegasus being attached to the Stargazer...

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #50 on: 04/25/2007 07:58 PM »
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline EirikV

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 261
  • Proud L2 member
  • Houston, TX (Rice '13)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 7
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #51 on: 04/25/2007 08:05 PM »
Some pictures..


Online Chris Bergin

Lovely images guys. Keep them coming.

T-20 minutes.

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #53 on: 04/25/2007 08:13 PM »
Do we have the steps.. seq numbers.. etc  13 mins... polling for internal power transfer

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #54 on: 04/25/2007 08:14 PM »
On internal power

Offline William Graham

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4203
  • Liked: 207
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #55 on: 04/25/2007 08:14 PM »

Quote
Avron - 25/4/2007 8:13 PM Do we have the steps.. seq numbers.. etc 13 mins... polling for internal power transfer

 http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/elv/index-ae.html


Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #56 on: 04/25/2007 08:15 PM »
FTS checks...?

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #57 on: 04/25/2007 08:15 PM »
FTS checks good.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin


Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32415
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11154
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #59 on: 04/25/2007 08:16 PM »
flight termination system

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #60 on: 04/25/2007 08:17 PM »
Thanks .. see all them folks are out there

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #61 on: 04/25/2007 08:18 PM »
Launch window is go!

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #62 on: 04/25/2007 08:18 PM »
How long now until Pegasus seperation?  

 :)

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #63 on: 04/25/2007 08:18 PM »
Weather green

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #64 on: 04/25/2007 08:18 PM »
Avionics going internal.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline EirikV

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 261
  • Proud L2 member
  • Houston, TX (Rice '13)
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 7
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #65 on: 04/25/2007 08:18 PM »

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #66 on: 04/25/2007 08:19 PM »
Range is go

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #67 on: 04/25/2007 08:19 PM »
NASA management team is go!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

All go for launch on final readiness poll.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #69 on: 04/25/2007 08:19 PM »
L-7 and counting!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline William Graham

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4203
  • Liked: 207
  • Likes Given: 87
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #70 on: 04/25/2007 08:20 PM »
Webcast is only 17 seconds behind real-time. Not bad.

Online Chris Bergin

Five minutes to drop.

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4925
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 153
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #72 on: 04/25/2007 08:21 PM »
TDRSS coms at T+1 ???

Online Chris Bergin


Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #74 on: 04/25/2007 08:22 PM »
Launch team is GO!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #75 on: 04/25/2007 08:23 PM »
Final poll: all go!

Go Pegasus! Go AIM!

L-4 minutes.
-DaviD-

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #76 on: 04/25/2007 08:24 PM »
L1011 inside drop box.
-DaviD-

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #77 on: 04/25/2007 08:24 PM »
Pegasus guidance ready!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #78 on: 04/25/2007 08:24 PM »
T-120 seconds!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #79 on: 04/25/2007 08:25 PM »
2 minutes.
-DaviD-

Online Chris Bergin

Now on Launch Heading.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #81 on: 04/25/2007 08:25 PM »
T-60 seconds! Go Pegasus!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

T-30 seconds. Go Pegasus. Go AIM.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #83 on: 04/25/2007 08:26 PM »
Testing fins.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline Skinny

  • NSF Webmaster
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 331
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #84 on: 04/25/2007 08:26 PM »

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #85 on: 04/25/2007 08:27 PM »
DROP and ENGINE START! GO PEGASUS GO!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

Very nice launch.

Online Chris Bergin

MaxQ for Pegasus. T+1min

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #88 on: 04/25/2007 08:28 PM »
Stage 1-2 sep!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #89 on: 04/25/2007 08:28 PM »
WO-HOOO!

GO PEGASUS!!  A great launch :)

Online Chris Bergin

Stage 1 burnout. Stage 2 ignition.

Offline Skinny

  • NSF Webmaster
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 331
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #91 on: 04/25/2007 08:28 PM »

Online Chris Bergin


Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #93 on: 04/25/2007 08:29 PM »
Fairing sep!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

Faring Sep. All nominal. T+2:30.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #95 on: 04/25/2007 08:29 PM »
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline Skinny

  • NSF Webmaster
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 331
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #96 on: 04/25/2007 08:29 PM »

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #97 on: 04/25/2007 08:29 PM »

TVC and RCS are nominal.

Coast phase (2 minutes)

-DaviD-

Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #98 on: 04/25/2007 08:30 PM »
Sun affecting solar arrays and batteries of the spacecraft.
-DaviD-

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #99 on: 04/25/2007 08:30 PM »
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

Waiting for 2-3 Stage Sep.

Online Chris Bergin

260 miles in altitude and rising.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #102 on: 04/25/2007 08:33 PM »
Orienting for stage 3 burn.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

60 seconds to Stage 3 ignition.

Online Chris Bergin

2-3 Seperation. Stage 3 ignition. All nominal. A few minutes away from spacecraft seperation.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #105 on: 04/25/2007 08:34 PM »
Stage 2-3 sep, stage 3 ignition!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

360 miles altitude.

Velocity got one big kick there. Over 12,000 miles per hour.

Online Chris Bergin

Vehicle has reached orbit. Standing by for spacecraft seperation.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #108 on: 04/25/2007 08:36 PM »
Altitude 373 miles, velocity 17,000 mph.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

17,000 miles per hour and stable.

373 miles in altitude and stable.

Waiting for spacecraft seperation.

Online Chris Bergin

Spacecraft seperation! Nice job!

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #111 on: 04/25/2007 08:37 PM »
SPACECRAFT SEPARATION!
Congratulations to Orbital and Pegasus!
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Offline Skinny

  • NSF Webmaster
  • Administrator
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 331
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #112 on: 04/25/2007 08:37 PM »

Online Chris Bergin


Online eeergo

  • Phystronaut
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5082
  • Milan, Italy; Spain; Japan
  • Liked: 794
  • Likes Given: 539
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #114 on: 04/25/2007 08:38 PM »
Cool launch! Congratulations to Orbital and AIM teams!

Now third stage performing collision avoidance maneuvers.
-DaviD-

Offline Lee Jay

  • Elite Veteran
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6683
  • Liked: 982
  • Likes Given: 140
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #115 on: 04/25/2007 08:38 PM »
A very smooth, professional launch.  Well done and congratulations to the team!

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #116 on: 04/25/2007 08:39 PM »
Definately a very quick and smooth launch. Success all round! :)

Online Chris Bergin

12 mins 15 seconds mission time.

Online Chris Bergin

Free video of the launch here: http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=7663&start=1

L2 video still recording.

Offline Nick L.

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3860
  • A unique little aerospace company
  • Liked: 4
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #119 on: 04/25/2007 08:43 PM »
AIM signal received by TDRS.
"Now you may leave here for four days in space, but when you return it's the same old place..."

Online Chris Bergin

AIM happily in orbit. Telemetery picked up by TDRSS(Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System).

(Thanks Dave).

Offline ShuttleDiscovery

  • NASA's first teenage astronaut
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
  • UK
    • Shuttle Discovery's Space Page
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #121 on: 04/25/2007 08:47 PM »
I just want to say thanks to Chris for providing us with all these up to the second updates for this launch!

Great job :)

Online Chris Bergin

Full 187mb high quality video on L2.

Offline shuttlepilot

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 244
  • nearby Warsaw, Poland
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #123 on: 04/25/2007 09:01 PM »

Offline John44

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3818
  • Netherlands
    • space-multimedia
  • Liked: 155
  • Likes Given: 0

Offline vt_hokie

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3028
  • Hazlet, NJ
  • Liked: 92
  • Likes Given: 227
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #125 on: 04/25/2007 09:49 PM »
Quote
ShuttleDiscovery - 25/4/2007  4:47 PM

I just want to say thanks to Chris for providing us with all these up to the second updates for this launch!

Great job :)

I'll second that, and congrats to all involved!

Offline Paul Howard

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 457
  • Perth, Western Australia
  • Liked: 5
  • Likes Given: 19
Re: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #126 on: 04/26/2007 12:21 AM »
Well done to Orbital and the NASA people involved.

http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/070425/aqw118.html?.v=3

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17667
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3331
  • Likes Given: 195
RE: LIVE: Pegasus XL launch - AIM mission - April 25, 2007
« Reply #127 on: 04/26/2007 03:14 AM »
RELEASE: 07-92

NASA'S AIM MISSION SOARS TO THE EDGE OF SPACE

VANDENBERG, Calif. - NASA's Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM)
spacecraft, the first mission dedicated to the exploration of
mysterious ice clouds that dot the edge of space in Earth's polar
regions, successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base,
Calif., at 1:26 p.m. PDT on Wednesday, April 25.

The mission will study clouds that are noctilucent, meaning they can
be seen from the ground only at night, when they are illuminated by
sunlight no longer visible from the Earth's surface.

"The successful AIM launch initiates an exciting new era in
understanding how noctilucent clouds form and why they vary," said
Principal Investigator James M. Russell, III, of Hampton University
in Hampton, Va. "The coordinated AIM measurements will provide the
first focused and comprehensive data set needed to unravel the
mysteries of these clouds."

Noctilucent clouds are increasing in number, becoming brighter and are
occurring at lower latitudes than ever before. "Such variations
suggest a connection with global change," said Russell. "If true, it
means that human influences are affecting the entire atmosphere, not
just the region near the Earth's surface."

The Stargazer L-1011 aircraft released a Pegasus XL rocket at a drop
point over the Pacific Ocean, 100 miles offshore west-southwest of
Point Sur, Calif. AIM was launched at an azimuth of 192.5 degrees
into a circular polar orbit of 375 miles with an inclination of 97.7
degrees.

At approximately 1:36 p.m., communications from a Tracking Data and
Relay Satellite confirmed spacecraft separation, and the solar arrays
deployed autonomously soon thereafter.

The spacecraft was declared operating nominally at approximately 2:44
p.m., when it passed over the Svalbard, Norway, ground station.
Spacecraft bus commissioning activities will be performed during the
next six days while controllers verify satisfactory performance of
all spacecraft subsystems.

Throughout a 30-day check-out period, all the spacecraft subsystems
and instruments will be evaluated and compared to their performance
during ground testing to ensure satisfactory operation in the space
environment. The instruments will maintain their protective covers to
shield the near pristine optical surfaces from contamination while
the spacecraft outgases volatile materials. Fourteen days after
launch, the optical covers will be removed in sequence by ground
commands, and the instruments will begin scientific operations.

During the next two years, AIM scientists will methodically address
each of six fundamental objectives that will provide critical
information needed to understand cloud formation and behavior.

"This mission has many firsts, including that Hampton University is
the first historically black college and university to have the
principle investigator and total mission responsibility for a NASA
satellite mission," said Program Executive Victoria Elsbernd, NASA
Headquarters, Washington.

NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla., is responsible for launch
vehicle/spacecraft integration and launch countdown management.
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., is responsible
for the overall AIM mission management in collaboration with Hampton
University, the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg. Orbital
Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Va., is responsible for providing the
Pegasus XL launch service to NASA.

AIM is the ninth small-class mission under NASA's Explorer Program,
which provides frequent flight opportunities for world-class
scientific investigations from space within the heliophysics and
astrophysics science areas.

For more information about NASA and the AIM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/aim

Tags: