Author Topic: LLRV  (Read 3436 times)

Offline Apolloman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 108
  • France
    • De la Terre à la Lune
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
LLRV
« on: 08/02/2007 05:53 PM »
Hello..
I would need (once again) information  ;)
I know the mark of manufacture of the ejector seat of the LLRV (Weber Aircraft) but I do not know his denomination..

thank you by advance for your assistance (if you have photographs. well on)

sorry for my poor English
Paul Cultrera
webmaster du site http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/
consacré au programme Apollo.

Le savoir est un trésor à partager avec tout le monde...

Offline Rusty_Barton

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
  • "Hello, world!"
  • Sacramento, CA
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LLRV
« Reply #1 on: 08/06/2007 10:09 PM »
I believe you are asking for the pounds of thrust that the LLRV ejection seat rocket motor put out. I checked through various PDF documents on the NASA NTRS server and was unable to find a figure for that.

The Lunar Module required a crew of two. Why were the LLRV and LLTV only designed to carry a crew of one?

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32131
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 10783
  • Likes Given: 321
RE: LLRV
« Reply #2 on: 08/06/2007 11:55 PM »
Quote
Rusty_Barton - 6/8/2007  6:09 PM

I believe you are asking for the pounds of thrust that the LLRV ejection seat rocket motor put out. I checked through various PDF documents on the NASA NTRS server and was unable to find a figure for that.

The Lunar Module required a crew of two. Why were the LLRV and LLTV only designed to carry a crew of one?

The last part of the landing only required one astronaut

Offline Rusty_Barton

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
  • "Hello, world!"
  • Sacramento, CA
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LLRV
« Reply #3 on: 08/07/2007 01:26 AM »
It seemed to take two in practice. The CDR looked out the window and flew the LM while the LMP scanned the instrument panel and relayed remaining fuel, altitude, velocity info, etc. to the CDR.

Offline MKremer

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3907
  • Liked: 13
  • Likes Given: 482
RE: LLRV
« Reply #4 on: 08/07/2007 01:35 AM »
The key word there is "flew". The LLRV was strictly a LM flight simulator to prepare the person flying the LM for the actual simulation of control, descent, and touchdown under 1/6G.

Offline Ratliff

  • Member
  • Posts: 15
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: LLRV
« Reply #5 on: 08/07/2007 02:16 AM »
Quote
Apolloman - 2/8/2007  12:53 PM

Hello..
I would need (once again) information  ;)
I know the mark of manufacture of the ejector seat of the LLRV (Weber Aircraft) but I do not know his denomination..

thank you by advance for your assistance (if you have photographs. well on)

sorry for my poor English

Try www.ejectionsite.com

Offline texas_space

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 392
  • Ex Terra, Scientia
  • Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, USA
  • Liked: 2
  • Likes Given: 8
RE: LLRV
« Reply #6 on: 08/07/2007 02:40 AM »
Cherchez-vous le numbre de type de la chaise?

Are you looking for model number/type of the ejector seat? Does anyone know where to find that?
"We went to the moon nine times. Why fake it nine times, if we faked it?" - Charlie Duke

Offline Apolloman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 108
  • France
    • De la Terre à la Lune
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LLRV
« Reply #7 on: 08/07/2007 02:21 PM »
to afflict for the delay, I seek it model number, thank you

[img=http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/7922/image1uv5.jpg]
Paul Cultrera
webmaster du site http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/
consacré au programme Apollo.

Le savoir est un trésor à partager avec tout le monde...

Offline Rusty_Barton

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
  • "Hello, world!"
  • Sacramento, CA
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LLRV
« Reply #8 on: 08/08/2007 03:53 AM »
Quote
Apolloman - 7/8/2007  9:21 AM

to afflict for the delay, I seek it model number, thank you


A part number is listed for the LLRV Weber Ejection Seat in the following PDF manual:

Lunar Landing Research Vehicle
Weight and Balance Handbook

http://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19720066983_1972066983.pdf

Page 1-11

Table 1-8 LLRV Equipment Checklist

"Description and Part Number"

Ejection Seat, Weber, 802900

Offline Apolloman

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 108
  • France
    • De la Terre à la Lune
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: LLRV
« Reply #9 on: 08/08/2007 06:16 AM »
(France 08:10 AM) Hello and thank you Rusty
Paul Cultrera
webmaster du site http://www.de-la-terre-a-la-lune.com/
consacré au programme Apollo.

Le savoir est un trésor à partager avec tout le monde...

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5206
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1879
  • Likes Given: 1285
Re: LLRV
« Reply #10 on: 12/09/2017 04:07 AM »
bump for video related to topic...

Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) Flight Tests 1964 Bell Aerosystems; Moon Landing Test Aircraft

Jeff Quitney
Published on Dec 8, 2017

Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) final assembly, flight preparations, and initial flights in 1964 are shown. The success of the two LLRVs as moon landing simulators led to the building of three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTVs) for use by Apollo astronauts

The Bell Aerosystems Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) was an Apollo Project era program to build a simulator for the Moon landings. The LLRVs were used by the FRC, now known as the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, at Edwards Air Force Base, California, to study and analyze piloting techniques needed to fly and land the Apollo Lunar Module in the moon's low gravity environment.

The research vehicles were vertical take-off vehicles that used a single jet engine mounted on a gimbal so that it always pointed vertically. It was adjusted to cancel 5/6 of the vehicle's weight, and the vehicle used hydrogen peroxide rockets which could fairly accurately simulate the behavior of a lunar lander.

The success of the two LLRVs led to the building of three Lunar Landing Training Vehicles (LLTVs) of broadly similar appearance, for use by Apollo astronauts.

The final phase of every Apollo landing was manually piloted by the mission commander. Because of navigational problems, Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, said his mission would not have been successful without extensive training on the LLTVs...

History

Built of aluminum alloy trusses, the LLRVs were powered by a General Electric CF700-2V turbofan engine with a thrust of 4,200 lbf (19 kN), mounted vertically in a gimbal. The engine lifted the vehicle to the test altitude and was then throttled back to support five-sixths of the vehicle's weight, simulating the reduced gravity of the moon. Two hydrogen peroxide lift rockets with thrust that could be varied from 100 to 500 lbf (440 to 2,200 N) handled the vehicle's rate of descent and horizontal movement. Sixteen smaller hydrogen peroxide thrusters, mounted in pairs, gave the pilot control in pitch, yaw and roll. The pilot had an ejection seat for safety. Manufactured by Weber Aircraft LLC, it was one of the first zero-zero ejection seats, capable of saving the operator even if the aircraft was stationary on the ground - a necessity given the LLRV's low and slow flight envelope.

After conceptual planning and meetings with engineers from Bell Aerosystems, Buffalo, New York, a company with experience in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft, NASA issued Bell a $50,000 study contract in December 1961... resulting in a $3.6 million production contract awarded to Bell on February 1, 1963.

The two LLRVs were shipped from Bell to the FRC in April 1964, with program emphasis on vehicle No. 1. It was first readied for captured flight on a tilt table constructed at the FRC to test the engines without actually flying. The scene then shifted to the old South Base area of Edwards. On the day of the first flight, 30 October 1964, research pilot Joe Walker flew it three times for a total of just under 60 seconds to a peak altitude of ten feet (3 m)....

NASA had accumulated enough data from the LLRV flight program at the FRC by mid-1966 to give Bell a contract to deliver three LLTVs at a cost of $2.5 million each.

After testing at the FRC, the LLRVs were sent to Houston, where research pilots learned to become LLTV instructor pilots and the LLRVs were converted to LLTV standard and redesignated LLTV-A1 and LLTV-A2. In December 1967, the first of the new LLTVs arrived, to eventually make up the five-vehicle LLTV training and simulator fleet.

In all, Bell built five LM trainers of both types. During training flights at Ellington AFB near Houston, Texas, three of the five vehicles were destroyed in crashes. Neil Armstrong was flying LLTV-A1 on May 6, 1968 when it went out of control. He ejected safely and the vehicle crashed. Two of those built as LLTVs were lost in further crashes on December 8, 1968 (piloted by Joe Algranti) and January 29, 1971 (piloted by Stuart Present). These two pilots also ejected safely from the crashing LLTV's.

LLTV-A2 was eventually returned to Dryden, where it is on display as a silent artifact of the Center's contribution to the Apollo program. The sole surviving late-model LLTV, NASA 952, is on display at the Johnson Space Center.

--------------------------------------------------

Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AouZlCXaMEg?t=001


Tony De La Rosa

Tags: