Author Topic: Space Station Development Program 1962  (Read 750 times)

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4645
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 1466
  • Likes Given: 891
Space Station Development Program 1962
« on: 11/02/2017 07:11 PM »
Space Station Development Program 1962 General Dynamics Convair Astronautics

Jeff Quitney
Published on Nov 2, 2017


Summary of an early research study on space station development at Convair Astronautics.

A 1963 paper on similar work at North American Aviation:

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19640048077.pdf

Excerpts:

Weightlessness remains the single variable of interest for manned space Radiation, a flight that cannot be studied in any situation short of an orbital flight. temperature, pressure, high-G loading, noise, vibration, environmental control system parameters, isolation, and confinement can be manipulated and controlled on the ground for determination of their effects upon man, at least to a degree where reasonable projections to space operations can be made. As a consequence, human response to extended weightlessness remains unknown and will continue so until extended orbital flights have been accomplished. lessness is only one of several questions that can be asked. Of equal, if not greater importance, are such questions as: (1) Given certain effects, less than lethal, what are the exact nature of these effects? (2) What steps can be taken to alleviate observed effects that degrade human functioning and how effective are such procedures? (3) What are the long-term effects following exposure to extended weightlessness? With this knowledge, space systems and conditioning regimens can be designed for crews exposed to weightlessness. Where long-term, irreversible effects following exposure are known, the occupational hazards of space flight can be evaluated; and realistic decisions can be made with respect to them by both space program management and the crew participants.

Human response to acceleration offers a parallel to response to weightlessness. accelerations greater than 1 G. can survive some but not others. what are the effects of acceleration on the human organism and its performance, and how can systems be designed to ameliorate the effects and compensate for human response limitations under acceleration? Acceleration devices and experimental test programs provided data relevant to such questions that have guided design of Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo systems. A test vehicle, a laboratory, and an experimental program to provide comparable data for weightlessness are required to provide the basis upon which the safe and effective use of crews in long-duration space missions can be firmly established.

The most pertinent question is not whether man can survive The question has no unequivocal answer; he The questions of greatest importance are The requirements for the test vehicle and its associated subsystems, the laboratory facility, the experimental personnel and subjects, and the experimental program are interdependent elements in the total program for assaying weightlessness effects. subject to trade-off decisions. requirements for laboratory facilities, personnel, vehicles, and support systems and is the natural point of departure for the life scientist concerned with the weightlessness problem. Experimental programs must inevitably change in time; and if laboratory facilities are too exactly tailored to pre-determined programs, they may not be readily adaptable to changes in program.

Space station laboratory facility; the development and management of the experimental programs; and the unique research operations including selection and training of personnel, ground testing and simulation, in-orbit testing, and data handling; and ground surveillance would represent not more than 10 percent of total program costs, hardware systems and logistics support costs must inevitably set constraints for realistic programs. realistic experimental program, however, must be realistic not only from the standpoint of minimizing costs but must be realistic in the sense of providing data upon which decisions can be made with the greatest confidence. Costs of a space station program, then, cannot be the overriding determinant. An inexpensive program that does not provide adequate data to answer the questions and make the decisions may turn out to be very expensive indeed.

-------------------------------
Originally a public domain film, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxKa6vgxf04?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline the_other_Doug

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2484
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • Liked: 1518
  • Likes Given: 2676
Re: Space Station Development Program 1962
« Reply #1 on: 11/03/2017 01:45 AM »
I wondered, when I saw this was from Convair, if it would resolve an old curiosity of mine.

You see, when I was a kid, I owned a plastic model of something called the "Atlas Space Station," and I recall on the box that it stated it was taken from actual plans by Convair.

As a 10-year-old, I believed that.  As a teen-ager, I became cynical, and decided they must have just been making that part up.

But, this film by Convair shows an Atlas-body space station, configured exactly like my old model.

I found an image of the model box top on the internet, shown below.  See?  It *was* created from plans by Convair!

:)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline Moonwatcher

  • Member
  • Posts: 26
  • Haslett, MI
  • Liked: 17
  • Likes Given: 546
Re: Space Station Development Program 1962
« Reply #2 on: 11/03/2017 02:04 AM »
I wondered, when I saw this was from Convair, if it would resolve an old curiosity of mine.

You see, when I was a kid, I owned a plastic model of something called the "Atlas Space Station," and I recall on the box that it stated it was taken from actual plans by Convair.

As a 10-year-old, I believed that.  As a teen-ager, I became cynical, and decided they must have just been making that part up.

But, this film by Convair shows an Atlas-body space station, configured exactly like my old model.

I found an image of the model box top on the internet, shown below.  See?  It *was* created from plans by Convair!

:)

Now that's a blast from the past. I had completely forgotten about this. Yes, I had one too.

Offline koroljow

  • Member
  • Posts: 78
  • Rees - Germany
  • Liked: 11
  • Likes Given: 7
Re: Space Station Development Program 1962
« Reply #3 on: 11/03/2017 07:16 AM »
San Diego Air & Space Museum has some more stuff online. Do a search for atlas space station or convair outpost at their Flickr collection. And you will get something like this:
« Last Edit: 11/03/2017 07:16 AM by koroljow »
Geschichte und Geschichten aus sechs Jahrzehnten Raumfahrt:
http://www.raumfahrtkalender.de

Offline eric z

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 244
  • Liked: 117
  • Likes Given: 314
Re: Space Station Development Program 1962
« Reply #4 on: 11/08/2017 12:13 AM »
 This thread makes my week! Fan-tastic! Dig the lifting-body, too. Just think where we might be by now if we had really started pushing things like this... Thanks for this, very much.

Offline Michel Van

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 113
  • Liege, Belgium
  • Liked: 32
  • Likes Given: 69
Re: Space Station Development Program 1962
« Reply #5 on: 11/11/2017 06:49 PM »
the San Diego Air&Space Museum uploaded allot picture of Convair Astronautics at Flickr.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/sdasmarchives/with/29634749035/

include also the Atlas Station and it inventor Kraft Ehricke

Kraft Ehricke and Dr. Friedrich


Some Detail of the Model











Tags: