Author Topic: SLS EM-1 & -2 launch dates realign; EM-3 gains notional mission outline  (Read 21329 times)

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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The management problems abound for the SLS/Orion/GSE projects.
https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/gao-warns-nasa-to-avoid-management-mistakes-like-those-that-led-to-columbia-tragedy/

My primary worry about the NASA upper management is that they seem to be cut off from what is really happening at the lower levels and are in the dark about schedule and possibly even costs (since schedule and costs are two peas in the same pod) but hopefully not about safety. But this latest GAO report gives questions even about that aspect.

Some of that is having less control and insight into the actual activities than they normally would have over the contractors because of the changes in the contracts to help supposedly reduce costs. It was a risk. One that seems to have bitten them. But this is not to say that even if they had the improved control and insight that the end result would be any different. There is evidence including the nature of the problems that have plagued the program that no other action other than what was taken would have resulted in any better schedule outcome. But going forward in a more tightly interdependent task schedule this loser coupling may pose schedule risks that can cause it's own problems. Too many players, contractors, NASA centers, even independent NASA project managers that just coordinate their activities and are not really controlled except at the NASA Director's level. The main problem is 3 separate congressional budget lines which makes 3 separate independent project mangers that manage their separate projects independently and only abide by the interface control documentation existing between them.

Offline woods170

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Public announcement of a new NET date for EM-1 is delayed (like pretty much everything else on SLS/Orion):

http://spacenews.com/decision-on-em-1-launch-date-still-pending/

Quote from: Jeff Foust
In September, the agency said in a statement that it would announce a new target date for EM-1 in October, citing the need to account for a range of issues, including progress on the European-built Orion service module and shutdowns at NASA centers from hurricanes in August and September.

However, an update in October is increasingly unlikely. “Within a few weeks, I think [NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot] intends to codify whatever that date is going to be,” Todd May, director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, said in remarks at the American Astronautical Society’s Wernher von Braun Memorial Symposium here Oct. 25.

Bill Hill, deputy associate administrator for exploration systems development at NASA, offered a similar assessment. “Probably in the next month, maybe sooner,” he said in an interview.

Offline Kasponaut

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Yes. That is pretty normal for a big programme like this. Don’t be so negative on SLS just because it isn’t a newspace company thats working on it. And look at all the delays SpaceX is having with Falcon Heavy. I bet even BFR/BFS won’t fly like planned before the 2030’ ;-)
« Last Edit: 10/26/2017 05:33 PM by Kasponaut »

Online AncientU

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The management problems abound for the SLS/Orion/GSE projects.
https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/gao-warns-nasa-to-avoid-management-mistakes-like-those-that-led-to-columbia-tragedy/

My primary worry about the NASA upper management is that they seem to be cut off from what is really happening at the lower levels and are in the dark about schedule and possibly even costs (since schedule and costs are two peas in the same pod) but hopefully not about safety. But this latest GAO report gives questions even about that aspect.

Some of that is having less control and insight into the actual activities than they normally would have over the contractors because of the changes in the contracts to help supposedly reduce costs. It was a risk. One that seems to have bitten them. But this is not to say that even if they had the improved control and insight that the end result would be any different. There is evidence including the nature of the problems that have plagued the program that no other action other than what was taken would have resulted in any better schedule outcome. But going forward in a more tightly interdependent task schedule this loser coupling may pose schedule risks that can cause it's own problems. Too many players, contractors, NASA centers, even independent NASA project managers that just coordinate their activities and are not really controlled except at the NASA Director's level. The main problem is 3 separate congressional budget lines which makes 3 separate independent project mangers that manage their separate projects independently and only abide by the interface control documentation existing between them.

Mind-numbing...
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
-- SpaceX friend of mlindner

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Eric Berger's write-up on EM-1 launch date changes:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/10/sls-rocket-advancing-but-its-launch-date-may-slip-into-2020/

Includes:

Quote
Recently, the managing editor of the NASASpaceFlight.com, Chris Bergin, suggested that NASA managers are deciding between a "best case" launch date of December 2019 for the SLS rocket, and a "risk informed" date the second quarter of 2020. Bergin is a reliable source of inside information about NASA, and sources subsequently confirmed this information to Ars.
« Last Edit: 10/26/2017 02:03 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline woods170

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Yes. That is pretty normal for a big programme like this. Don’t be so negative om SLS just because it isn’t a newspace company thats working on it. And look at all the delays SpaceX is having with Falcon Heavy. I bet even BFR/BFS won’t fly like planned before the 2030’ ;-)
I wasn't being negative. I was stating a fact.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
Lightfoot: think we’ll be selecting an EM-1 launch date in about a week. #vonbraun

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/923615176200544256

Offline Star One

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Kind of hard to know where to post news about SLS developments sometimes due to proliferation of threads?

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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If the real launch date once it occurs whether it is scheduled for earlier in late 2019 or not is in May 2020, then the next earliest SLS launch date possible is Dec 2022. Also if that EC would launch before EM-2 but EC launch would not take place until Mid 2023 with the possible quick turn around for another SLS launch (possible but not likely) 6 months later putting EM-2 in 1Q2024. That is 12 years after the start of the SLS/Orion program with it's first manned test launch. At least one problem the availability of the PPE to fly on EM-2 with such a date may not be a concern being that there would be about 5 years to produce the PPE once on contract to meet that date.

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