Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-12 : Aug 14, 2017 : DISCUSSION  (Read 74901 times)

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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I am excited that the launch has been delayed. I now have the opportunity to possibly fly to Florida and see it.

This will be a 48 hour turn around in the event of a scrub correct? I want to make sure I have enough days in the event of a short delay.

Super risky to plan a trip around this launch. Instant launch windows are notorious for scrubs, and this is is an afternoon flight in FL in August. A scrub because of thunderstorms is also a likely outcome.
I am taking numerous precautions. I am going to pay extra for a plane ticket that can be rescheduled in the event that the launch is postponed. I will be there for several days so that I can take a few scrubs. But most importantly, if all goes wrong and I don't see a launch I will still have fun.  :) I will tour KSC (haven't done that in years), go to Port Canaveral and try and see the drone ship, and a few other non-space related activities.

So... I'd been wanting to post this here about your travel plans, but couldn't until the article was out. There's a potentially tricky situation with CRS-12's launch as they might only have a single day to get off the ground because of the upcoming Russian EVA.  It's all here: https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/07/tdrs-priority-crs-12-dragon-launch-dates-realign/

Online gongora

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As mentioned in Chris G.'s article on the CRS-12 scheduling issues, the mice going up on this flight are for Rodent Research-9, not Rodent Research-6.  I guess #6 will be on one of the next couple Dragon missions.

[Ohio University] Biology Alum Sending Rodent Research Project to International Space Station
[NASA] Rodent Research-9

Online rockets4life97

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Any chance this moves back to the 10th? Or has the schedule realignment already done its damage?

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Any chance this moves back to the 10th? Or has the schedule realignment already done its damage?

It might have already done its damage with ISS crew schedules, mission processing, and readiness all having been realigned to the 14th.  Also, remember, SpaceX requested 14 Aug last Friday... four days before NASA requested the 10th for TDRS-M (which means there has been six days of realigned work flows already -- including the realigned Static Fire date of 9 Aug).  So the slip might not have been 100% TDRS-M and might have involved other factors.

That said, we'll see what tomorrow brings.
« Last Edit: 07/26/2017 10:51 PM by ChrisGebhardt »

Online gongora

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This is a really nice gesture, but if the article is correct about which flight it's on and when they did it, then I'm really confused about the current SpaceX booster inventory.  Weren't we thinking the CRS-12 booster was already at the Cape?

[KWTX] SpaceX pays tribute to local teen whose death sparked a movement
Quote
MCGREGOR, Texas (KWTX) The next rocket SpaceX launches will carry a tribute to Rhett Hering, the 15-year-old son of McGregor’s mayor whose death in an ATV accident in 2015 sparked the creation of a community-wide service project called the “Rhett Revolution.”
The “Rhett Revolution” sticker was placed on the interior of a Falcon 9 rocket first stage booster, which is scheduled for launch in August. (Photo by Julie Hays)

On Tuesday night, McGregor Mayor Jimmy Herrng, his wife Lorna and their children, Mara and Ryan, were invited to a hangar at SpaceX's rocket research and development facility in McGregor, to place a “Rhett Revolution” sticker on the interior of a Falcon 9 rocket first stage booster, which is scheduled for launch next month.
...


Offline old_sellsword

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This is a really nice gesture, but if the article is correct about which flight it's on and when they did it, then I'm really confused about the current SpaceX booster inventory.  Weren't we thinking the CRS-12 booster was already at the Cape?

Not yet. 1038 finished testing and headed back west, 1039 was last seen heading to McGregor, and 1040 just left Hawthorne.
« Last Edit: 07/27/2017 01:29 AM by old_sellsword »


Offline stcks

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Online Herb Schaltegger

The “Rhett Revolution” sticker was placed on the interior of a Falcon 9 rocket first stage booster, which is scheduled for launch in August. (Photo by Julie Hays)

What part of the booster is that? One of the leg "fairings"?

Edit: fixed quote

No, it is the cover for one of the QD plates (probably the LOX one)
Hope the adhesives on that sticker are compatible with high ppO2 environments. Don’t want it bursting into flames or anything.  :)
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Offline Swoopert

What part of the booster is that? One of the leg "fairings"?

No, it is the cover for one of the QD plates (probably the LOX one)

For the few of you on this thread like myself who would have had to look that up, that's a Quick-Disconnect plate which is at the base of the booster used to swiftly and safely detach from the GSE LOX flow through the TSMs (Tail Service Masts) at liftoff :)

Online mn

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Part of the decision on scrub turnarounds will depend on whether the biological experiments need to be swapped out (there will be more mice).

Is this confirmed (i.e. can you point me to a link)?  I'm writing up an article about CRS-12 and I'd like to take about scrub turnaround options if there are going to be mouse-tronauts on CRS-12.  Thanks.

Confirmed by NASA Kennedy PAO.  "There are rodents." 🐭🐭🐭

Rodent Research 9 for NASA and the Mouse Habitat Unit - 2 (or Mouse House) for JAXA.

Sorry I can't remember or find where this was posted, but I'm sure I've seen a post by someone who seemed to be in the know about the mice swapping options, they explained that they prepare two sets of mice and each set can handle a single 24 scrub, so that means you attempt on day 1, again on day 2 and then if needed you need to swap to try day 4 and 5.

Perhaps that post was specific to that launch and not a general rule?

For CRS-11 and the 48 delay on the first scrub, it's possible that they elected to swap after one scrub because the weather was expected to be bad on the 2nd and much better on the 3rd, if they attempted on the 2nd and scrubbed they'd lose the opportunity to launch on the 3rd, so they elected to swap after one scrub and give themselves better chance on the 3rd. (just speculation)

Online abaddon

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With the TDRS launch slipping to the 20th, is the 14th still safe?

Offline russianhalo117

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With the TDRS launch slipping to the 20th, is the 14th still safe?
at this time yes.

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Part of the decision on scrub turnarounds will depend on whether the biological experiments need to be swapped out (there will be more mice).

Is this confirmed (i.e. can you point me to a link)?  I'm writing up an article about CRS-12 and I'd like to take about scrub turnaround options if there are going to be mouse-tronauts on CRS-12.  Thanks.

Confirmed by NASA Kennedy PAO.  "There are rodents." 🐭🐭🐭

Rodent Research 9 for NASA and the Mouse Habitat Unit - 2 (or Mouse House) for JAXA.

Sorry I can't remember or find where this was posted, but I'm sure I've seen a post by someone who seemed to be in the know about the mice swapping options, they explained that they prepare two sets of mice and each set can handle a single 24 scrub, so that means you attempt on day 1, again on day 2 and then if needed you need to swap to try day 4 and 5.

Perhaps that post was specific to that launch and not a general rule?

For CRS-11 and the 48 delay on the first scrub, it's possible that they elected to swap after one scrub because the weather was expected to be bad on the 2nd and much better on the 3rd, if they attempted on the 2nd and scrubbed they'd lose the opportunity to launch on the 3rd, so they elected to swap after one scrub and give themselves better chance on the 3rd. (just speculation)

No.  CRS-11 was a 48hr scrub in part for mice swap and would have been another 48hr scrub had the 2nd attempt not worked for the mice too.

How the mice are prepared has to do with what's being investigated.  Not to go into detail (because it's not pleasant for everyone), but for CRS-10, there were not two sets of mice completely prepared ahead of time.

The statement on this thread and in the article on site that the turnaround options for CRS-12 are in part driven by the biological samples headed to Station is correct.

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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With the TDRS launch slipping to the 20th, is the 14th still safe?
at this time yes.

To further this (and moderate note as well), as with all launches, once launch date requests are confirmed to Chris B, he will always post those immediately in the public threads.  If there's no update posted, then there's no update to the launch dates.

Offline WindyCity

https://www.army.mil/article/191708/smdc_prepares_for_upcoming_kestrel_eye_launch

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Alabama -- One U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command team is preparing for an out of this world product launch.

The USASMDC/ARSTRAT Technical Center's Kestrel Eye is a small, low-cost, visible-imagery satellite designed to provide images rapidly to the tactical-level ground Warfighter.

Forgive my ignorance. Are military payloads permitted to be serviced by the ISS? From the article, I gathered that the station crew will deploy the Kestrel Eye directly from the Dragon, so it won't ever be "aboard" the station. Still, it seems to me that other ISS partners might look askance at an operation that used the station to help test U.S. military hardware. What is the policy in this regard?

Online gongora

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https://www.army.mil/article/191708/smdc_prepares_for_upcoming_kestrel_eye_launch

REDSTONE ARSENAL, Alabama -- One U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command team is preparing for an out of this world product launch.

The USASMDC/ARSTRAT Technical Center's Kestrel Eye is a small, low-cost, visible-imagery satellite designed to provide images rapidly to the tactical-level ground Warfighter.

Forgive my ignorance. Are military payloads permitted to be serviced by the ISS? From the article, I gathered that the station crew will deploy the Kestrel Eye directly from the Dragon, so it won't ever be "aboard" the station. Still, it seems to me that other ISS partners might look askance at an operation that used the station to help test U.S. military hardware. What is the policy in this regard?

Kestrel Eye will go up as pressurized cargo and be deployed through the airlock on the Japanese module, just like lots of other small satellites (although it isn't a cubesat, it will need to use the larger deployer.)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Forgive my ignorance. Are military payloads permitted to be serviced by the ISS?

This is not the first time that a military cubesat has been deployed from the ISS. The US/Australian Biarri military cubesat was deployed from the ISS on 18 May. There may also be other military cubesats that have been deployed that we don't know about. That might explain why Nanoracks is so secretive in announcing the payloads they are launching to ISS.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Star One

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Forgive my ignorance. Are military payloads permitted to be serviced by the ISS?

This is not the first time that a military cubesat has been deployed from the ISS. The US/Australian Biarri military cubesat was deployed from the ISS on 18 May. There may also be other military cubesats that have been deployed that we don't know about. That might explain why Nanoracks is so secretive in announcing the payloads they are launching to ISS.

I thought even an organisation as secretive as the NRO still announced their cubesats.

Offline Skyrocket

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Forgive my ignorance. Are military payloads permitted to be serviced by the ISS?

This is not the first time that a military cubesat has been deployed from the ISS. The US/Australian Biarri military cubesat was deployed from the ISS on 18 May. There may also be other military cubesats that have been deployed that we don't know about. That might explain why Nanoracks is so secretive in announcing the payloads they are launching to ISS.

Biarri-Point is quite a mystery, as it has been claimed to be deployed, but has not been catalogized. I am not sure, if it has been indeed deployed. Perhaps it was to be deployed and was left stuck in the deployer. Or it remained stuck to another cubesat and has a shared ID with this one.

As other military satellites were deployed from the ISS openly announced and catalogized (e.g. SPINSAT, SHARC) and as Biarri is not particularly classified, i am not sure, what might have happened to Biarri-Point. 

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