Author Topic: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)  (Read 189585 times)

Online john smith 19

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #780 on: 12/02/2017 08:07 PM »

The original DARPA contract with us was fixed-price (which is how I managed all my gov't contracts or OTA agreements).  For Phase 3 they decided they wanted to go to cost-plus, and I didn't, so we novated the equipment, including that beautiful plenum (25K lbm of stainless...) to one of our subcontractors.  (DARPA can't actually own facilities so they never took title to the hardware.)  After Phase 3 ended, the equipment was removed from the site by that contractor and put in storage; beyond that I don't know the disposition – until I saw the photo above.
Which suggests either they are a sub contractor on this programme or they sold it off. It looks in good condition.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #782 on: 12/05/2017 06:09 AM »

For those of us who aren't experts :
https://www.globalsecurity.org/space/systems/rascal.htm

Quote
The power plant is comprised of conventional, military gas turbine engines but with a technology enhancement called Mass Injection and Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC) that allows for higher Mach number and altitude operation. This capability is required for the MPV to accomplish a zoom maneuver in which the vehicle accelerates as it climbs to very high altitude. There it deploys the expendable upper stage that places the payload on obit. The reusable MPV then decelerates upon reentry and lands on a conventional runway.

... which makes it sound like a true pre-cursor to SABRE and so fortunate that something that similar was done that the equipment could be reused.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #783 on: 12/05/2017 07:31 AM »

For those of us who aren't experts :
https://www.globalsecurity.org/space/systems/rascal.htm

... which makes it sound like a true pre-cursor to SABRE and so fortunate that something that similar was done that the equipment could be reused.
Only if by "pre cursor" you mean 12 years after REL was founded. :(

It's more like the precursor to the XS-1 concept, although it's unclear what launch speed they were targeting for the reusable aircraft. We know a Phantom II with this technology could achieve "Extended dash" speeds of M3  in the mid 70's. 

So more for the general hypersonics thread.

The rocket equation is pretty steep. Every extra Mach number is good, provided it's not bought at a vast cost. As a launch vehicle long term cruise at high speed is unnecessary. The Phantom II was  a 2 seat vehicle. Drone conversions have flown with an equipment rack fitted in the seat mounting rails, which seem to be quite standardized on military aircraft.  So stripping the weapon systems and possibly most of the "Systems Operator" support could deliver a system up to M4 for long enough to prep and drop a 2nd stage. Maybe
« Last Edit: 12/05/2017 07:13 PM by john smith 19 »
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #785 on: 12/07/2017 06:25 AM »

For those of us who aren't experts :
https://www.globalsecurity.org/space/systems/rascal.htm

Quote
The power plant is comprised of conventional, military gas turbine engines but with a technology enhancement called Mass Injection and Pre-Compressor Cooling (MIPCC) that allows for higher Mach number and altitude operation. This capability is required for the MPV to accomplish a zoom maneuver in which the vehicle accelerates as it climbs to very high altitude. There it deploys the expendable upper stage that places the payload on obit. The reusable MPV then decelerates upon reentry and lands on a conventional runway.

... which makes it sound like a true pre-cursor to SABRE and so fortunate that something that similar was done that the equipment could be reused.

Great link full of ads (even with an ad blocker) and doesn’t even format properly on a mobile browser, which makes it virtually impossible to read what the article says.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #786 on: 12/07/2017 08:17 AM »
An amusing diversion from the tech talk, but still on topic  ;)

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/6/16742530/visions-ventures-escape-velocities-anthology-ebook-arizona-state-university-science-fiction
Searched the book.
No sign of "Skylon" or "Reaction engines"
Want to reference which stories are relevant or move to the entertainment section?
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #787 on: 12/07/2017 08:31 AM »

For those of us who aren't experts :
https://www.globalsecurity.org/space/systems/rascal.htm

... which makes it sound like a true pre-cursor to SABRE and so fortunate that something that similar was done that the equipment could be reused.
No. A "true" precursor was the work "Aerospace" plane work in the US in the late 50's/early 60's using the "Liquid Air Cycle Engine"  and LH2 to liquefy air. This required a lot more LH2 (and SABRE C2 needed about 5x the LH2 it actually needed to burn to get the stated thrust level). Bond's realization that you could get near LO2 density without going to LO2, was a key breakthrough to making SABRE viable, as was an actual solution to the frost control problem.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

Offline oddbodd

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #788 on: 12/07/2017 11:22 AM »
An amusing diversion from the tech talk, but still on topic  ;)

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/6/16742530/visions-ventures-escape-velocities-anthology-ebook-arizona-state-university-science-fiction
Searched the book.
No sign of "Skylon" or "Reaction engines"
Want to reference which stories are relevant or move to the entertainment section?

Obviously I was being a bit too "cute" with my cryptic message. ;) It was just about the cover artwork having two very prominent Skylon vehicles in it, not the book itself. I wondered when I saw it whether REL have some kind of implicit/explicit copyright of the Skylon design, and whether or not the artist would of had to have sought permission to use the likeness in his work.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #789 on: 12/07/2017 06:46 PM »
An amusing diversion from the tech talk, but still on topic  ;)

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/6/16742530/visions-ventures-escape-velocities-anthology-ebook-arizona-state-university-science-fiction
Searched the book.
No sign of "Skylon" or "Reaction engines"
Want to reference which stories are relevant or move to the entertainment section?

Obviously I was being a bit too "cute" with my cryptic message. ;) It was just about the cover artwork having two very prominent Skylon vehicles in it, not the book itself. I wondered when I saw it whether REL have some kind of implicit/explicit copyright of the Skylon design, and whether or not the artist would of had to have sought permission to use the likeness in his work.
AFAIK Skylon came out of the REL design process  just after they were formed in the late 80's. They were fairly strapped for cash and I don't think it was ever patented (I'm not sure you can patent an aircraft layout under UK or EU patent law). In any case it's modeled on the Avro 730 M3 reconnaissance plane of the late 50's that fell victim to the Sandy's UK defense review of 1957.

So it also pre-dates Princess Amidala's  starship in the Star Wars films as well by a couple of decades.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #790 on: 12/07/2017 08:46 PM »
I think REL relies on trade secrets rather than patents, as patents can be stolen by governments and run out after 20 years anyway. It's almost as if they knew this would take a long time...

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #791 on: 12/15/2017 12:09 PM »
Quote
See the latest progress on our #TF1 test site @WestcottVP from our live feed cameras. bit.ly/2wAO0L6. Assembly building going up quick and the test site compound wall nearly complete.

https://twitter.com/reactionengines/status/941632553773158400

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #792 on: 12/15/2017 06:47 PM »
Quote
See the latest progress on our #TF1 test site @WestcottVP from our live feed cameras. bit.ly/2wAO0L6. Assembly building going up quick and the test site compound wall nearly complete.

https://twitter.com/reactionengines/status/941632553773158400
This looks like very solid progress.  I hope everything else is running as smoothly.
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #793 on: 12/18/2017 11:37 AM »
Reaction Begins Building U.S. Hypersonic Engine Test Site

Quote
A high-temperature airflow test site designed to evaluate a key technology in the Reaction Engines’ hypersonic air-breathing combined cycle Sabre rocket engine is under assembly at Front Range Airport near Watkins, Colorado. Construction of the facility follows the award earlier this year of a U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) contract to test the engine’s pre-cooler heat exchanger, or HTX. The test work, which is due to start in 2018, will focus on running ...

http://m.aviationweek.com/space/reaction-begins-building-us-hypersonic-engine-test-site

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #794 on: 12/18/2017 11:52 AM »
Quote
Reaction Engines Begins Construction of High-Temperature Airflow Test Facility in Colorado

WATKINS, CO – December 18, 2017

Reaction Engines, Inc. has begun construction of a new high-temperature airflow test facility where it plans to validate the performance of its precooler heat exchanger technology, an enabler of its revolutionary SABRETM engine. Located at the Front Range Airport near Watkins, Colorado, the test facility will be capable of exposing the precooler test article (HTX) to high-temperature airflow conditions in excess of 1800°F (1000°C) that are expected during high-speed flights up to Mach 5.

Reaction Engines, Inc. recently received a contract award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to conduct the HTX tests, which are designed to build upon previous successful testing of the precooler heat exchanger at ambient temperature conditions.

“This new test facility shows our commitment to rapidly prove our precooler technology in the most compelling test campaign possible,” said Dr. Adam Dissel, President of Reaction Engines Inc. “The facility’s ability to deliver controlled temperature profiles over flight-like run durations at significant airflow represents a unique capability that can fill additional testing demand beyond HTX.”

The project is an additional investment by Reaction Engines into ground test facilities. The company is progressing rapidly on the previously announced TF1 engine test facility in the United Kingdom where the first ground-based demonstration of its revolutionary SABRE™ air-breathing rocket engine will take place. The Colorado test facility, named TF2, consists of a test building and a control room located on the east side of the Front Range Airport. The hot air for the testing will be provided by a modified afterburning jet engine configured to produce a wide range of flowrates and temperatures.

“We are tremendously excited that Reaction Engines is locating their new engine test facility here at Front Range Airport and, as the future site of Spaceport Colorado, the linkages between high-speed aviation uses and the commercial space applications for this new technology are a perfect fit,” said Dave Ruppel, Front Range Airport Director. “Reaction Engines has been outstanding to work with and we are looking forward to being a small part of their ongoing success.”

Colorado has a long history as a leader in the U.S. aerospace sector, and provides a supportive and capable location for Reaction Engines’ expanding U.S. activity.

“Colorado is a leading aerospace state known for our innovative businesses that propel our growing aerospace economy,” remarked Jay Lindell, representing the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. “We are proud to have Reaction Engines in Colorado at the Front Range Airport and look forward to supporting their test operations that will lead to future cutting-edge propulsion technology.”

Once TF2 achieves full operations, and following the completion of HTX testing, the company plans to make the facility available to industry, technology developers, and universities who could benefit from the facility’s unique test capabilities.

Distribution Statement A:

Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited

https://www.reactionengines.co.uk/reaction-engines-begins-construction-high-temperature-airflow-test-facility-colorado/

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #795 on: 12/18/2017 07:31 PM »
Quote
Reaction Engines Begins Construction of High-Temperature Airflow Test Facility in Colorado

WATKINS, CO – December 18, 2017

Reaction Engines, Inc. has begun construction of a new high-temperature airflow test facility where it plans to validate the performance of its precooler heat exchanger technology, an enabler of its revolutionary SABRETM engine. Located at the Front Range Airport near Watkins, Colorado, the test facility will be capable of exposing the precooler test article (HTX) to high-temperature airflow conditions in excess of 1800°F (1000°C) that are expected during high-speed flights up to Mach 5.

Reaction Engines, Inc. recently received a contract award from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to conduct the HTX tests, which are designed to build upon previous successful testing of the precooler heat exchanger at ambient temperature conditions.

“This new test facility shows our commitment to rapidly prove our precooler technology in the most compelling test campaign possible,” said Dr. Adam Dissel, President of Reaction Engines Inc. “The facility’s ability to deliver controlled temperature profiles over flight-like run durations at significant airflow represents a unique capability that can fill additional testing demand beyond HTX.”

The project is an additional investment by Reaction Engines into ground test facilities. The company is progressing rapidly on the previously announced TF1 engine test facility in the United Kingdom where the first ground-based demonstration of its revolutionary SABRE™ air-breathing rocket engine will take place. The Colorado test facility, named TF2, consists of a test building and a control room located on the east side of the Front Range Airport. The hot air for the testing will be provided by a modified afterburning jet engine configured to produce a wide range of flowrates and temperatures.

“We are tremendously excited that Reaction Engines is locating their new engine test facility here at Front Range Airport and, as the future site of Spaceport Colorado, the linkages between high-speed aviation uses and the commercial space applications for this new technology are a perfect fit,” said Dave Ruppel, Front Range Airport Director. “Reaction Engines has been outstanding to work with and we are looking forward to being a small part of their ongoing success.”

Colorado has a long history as a leader in the U.S. aerospace sector, and provides a supportive and capable location for Reaction Engines’ expanding U.S. activity.

“Colorado is a leading aerospace state known for our innovative businesses that propel our growing aerospace economy,” remarked Jay Lindell, representing the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade. “We are proud to have Reaction Engines in Colorado at the Front Range Airport and look forward to supporting their test operations that will lead to future cutting-edge propulsion technology.”

Once TF2 achieves full operations, and following the completion of HTX testing, the company plans to make the facility available to industry, technology developers, and universities who could benefit from the facility’s unique test capabilities.

The opening of TF2 (is this the first new hypersonic test facility in the US for decades?) might also be appropriate to the "General Hypersonics" thread.
« Last Edit: 12/19/2017 08:24 AM by john smith 19 »
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

Online john smith 19

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #796 on: 12/22/2017 09:46 PM »
Quote
See the latest progress on our #TF1 test site @WestcottVP from our live feed cameras. bit.ly/2wAO0L6. Assembly building going up quick and the test site compound wall nearly complete.

https://twitter.com/reactionengines/status/941632553773158400
This looks like very solid progress.  I hope everything else is running as smoothly.
There are lots of questions about the test engine.

Will it be flight weight?

Will it be fully flight configuration?

Will it be possible to mfg two of them?
"Solids are a branch of fireworks, not rocketry. :-) :-) ", Henry Spencer 1/28/11  Averse to bold? You must be in marketing."It's all in the sequencing" K. Mattingly.  STS-Keeping most of the stakeholders happy most of the time.
So you're going to Mars to seek a better life. What does that mean to you? Always spot a fanbois by how they react to their idols failures.

Offline JCRM

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #797 on: 12/25/2017 12:17 AM »
In any case it's modeled on the Avro 730 M3 reconnaissance plane of the late 50's that fell victim to the Sandy's UK defense review of 1957.
You've said it three times so it must be true, or do you have a source for that?
I'm fairly certain the starting point was HOTOL, with the engines moved to the longitudinal centre of mass in the most logical way possible, but if we want to play "it looks like ... so must be based on it" I'd nominate the SO 9000 Trident
- air breathing engines at the wingtips roughly mid-body (unlike the Avro's at the rear)
- straight leading edge to the wings (unlike the Avro's pronounced convex curve)
- pure rocket engine in the tail (no pure rocket engine in the Avro),
- no undercarriage in the nacelles

The earliest Skylon design I've seen, the A4, didn't have horizontal canards - instead it had apparently taken HOTOL's front vertical fin and added two more at +-120 degrees.
 
There are lots of questions about the test engine.
Which one? Based on previous information about the revised test plans the first engine is just the helium loop, to be tested before TF1 is completed; the second is the core engine
Quote
Will it be flight weight?
the interesting parts will be built around flight weight, but some boilerplate and it wont be tightly coupled (to allow easier modification)
Quote
Will it be fully flight configuration?
No. The Integrated test article might be, but that's not the one expected to be tested when TF1 is completed, nor part of the funded test plan.
Quote
Will it be possible to mfg two of them?
Of course it would be possible, but the plans are to only test one at once, including flight testing the integrated test engine.

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #798 on: 12/25/2017 10:57 AM »
I respectfully support JCRM point of view here. AFAIK Skylon shape was an outgrowth of HOTOL severe CG issues - the engine in the back was too heavy.

The Avro 730 was one hell of a design (an aircraft with a periscope !) but even Tony Butler could find next to nothing about it in the archives. Looks as if everything was burned or melted in 1958, including the partially completed aircraft and any picture if there ever was one. By 1957 Alan Bond was aged 12.
Skylon looks like an Avro 730 the way a Spitfire looks like a Pilatus PC-9. Coincidence.

Also RR did Hotol 2, that stupid all rocket design launched from the back of the An-225, Bond had no relation with that one.
REL was created in 1989 to salvage HOTOL work, and move way from the RB-545 that only would never really work, but was also locked by both RR and the British military.
Bond must have been quite frakked off (irritated, damn the politically correct corrector !)  by Thatcher, RR, and the British military, and REL was the result.

Quote
Bond's realization that you could get near LO2 density without going to LO2, was a key breakthrough to making SABRE viable, as was an actual solution to the frost control problem.

And this major breakthrough happened in 1982-83 and was the brainchild of Alan Bond and John Scott-Scott.

The best source I've ever found on the origins of HOTOL is a 1993 book called "Spaceflight in the era of aero-spaceplane". The author had some interesting hindsight with the HOTOL / REL team.
« Last Edit: 12/25/2017 11:04 AM by Archibald »

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Re: The Reaction Engines Skylon/SABRE Master Thread (6)
« Reply #799 on: 12/26/2017 08:37 AM »
or do you have a source for that?
No. People kept saying Skylon  looks like an SR71 but actually it doesn't.
Chines (or Leading Edge Extensions) were an integral (and critical) part of the SR71 design. Skylon uses Canards to push the nose up, rather than tail surfaces to push the tail down. 
Likewise
Although later versions of the 730 have the engines mid wing the original pure reconnaissance  version had them on the wing tips. The reconnaissance/bomber version came later, when they realized the SAR antenna would be much smaller than originally expected and they could put an H bomb in with it.

However AFAIK all SAR's of the time recorded to film for offline processing to get the imagery. How the crew would use the returns from the SAR to help the mission is a bit of a mystery to me.

Today you'd say "They'd uplink to a satellite for damage assessment at base before getting new orders," but those systems simply didn't exist in the late 50's/early 60's.

My guess was that the founders would have knowledge of previous projects and look to kick start the vehicle design using designs they were familiar with and which they might have access to the aerodynamic data for. The 730 fit the bill.

I did not know until recently that the body shape is calculated one derived from low drag at high Mach numbers, rather than one of the conventional curves used for high speed nose cone designs.
Quote from: JCRM

I'm fairly certain the starting point was HOTOL, with the engines moved to the longitudinal centre of mass in the most logical way possible, but if we want to play "it looks like ... so must be based on it"
Not particularly.  It was more just pointing that the superficial resemblance was very superficial and other vehicles fit it better and were more probable data sources.
The point of a shape is not the shape. It's to be able to calculate the aerodynamic forces on it throughout the flight.
Quote from: JCRM
The earliest Skylon design I've seen, the A4, didn't have horizontal canards - instead it had apparently taken HOTOL's front vertical fin and added two more at +-120 degrees.
I don't think people realize that while the basic Skylon shape was decided early on REL have continued to refine it.
Quote from: JCRM
There are lots of questions about the test engine.
Which one? Based on previous information about the revised test plans the first engine is just the helium loop, to be tested before TF1 is completed; the second is the core engine
Quote
Will it be flight weight?
the interesting parts will be built around flight weight, but some boilerplate and it wont be tightly coupled (to allow easier modification)
Quote
Will it be fully flight configuration?
No. The Integrated test article might be, but that's not the one expected to be tested when TF1 is completed, nor part of the funded test plan.
Quote
Will it be possible to mfg two of them?
Of course it would be possible, but the plans are to only test one at once, including flight testing the integrated test engine.
That answers those questions.  Hopefully this should allow more funds to be raised to move toward the full SABRE engine.
I respectfully support JCRM point of view here. AFAIK Skylon shape was an outgrowth of HOTOL severe CG issues - the engine in the back was too heavy.

The Avro 730 was one hell of a design (an aircraft with a periscope !) but even Tony Butler could find next to nothing about it in the archives. Looks as if everything was burned or melted in 1958, including the partially completed aircraft and any picture if there ever was one. By 1957 Alan Bond was aged 12.
OTOH John Scott Scott was already married and working for Armstrong Siddley at the time. BTW the 730 was not the only aircraft of its time to use a periscope. IIRC the SR71 also had one. Small windows gave very poor visibility in landing.

Quote from: Archibald
Also RR did Hotol 2, that stupid all rocket design launched from the back of the An-225, Bond had no relation with that one.
The deadly cocktail of government bureaucracy saying "It's so good we've classified it" but OTOH "No it's not good enough for us to fund."
And that's (and the founders experience of Concorde)  what made REL very wary of seeking all government funding.  :(
Quote from: Archibald
REL was created in 1989 to salvage HOTOL work, and move way from the RB-545 that only would never really work, but was also locked by both RR and the British military.
Bond must have been quite frakked off (irritated, damn the politically correct corrector !)  by Thatcher, RR, and the British military, and REL was the result.
Quote
Bond's realization that you could get near LO2 density without going to LO2, was a key breakthrough to making SABRE viable, as was an actual solution to the frost control problem.

And this major breakthrough happened in 1982-83 and was the brainchild of Alan Bond and John Scott-Scott.

The best source I've ever found on the origins of HOTOL is a 1993 book called "Spaceflight in the era of aero-spaceplane". The author had some interesting hindsight with the HOTOL / REL team.
I'll have to look out for that.

There's an interview with either Richard Varville or Alan Bond in BIS Spaceflight sometime in 1989 (by Mark Hempsell). I don't think it's with Bond directly as it refers to him in the third person.   

Bond is quoted as saying that the early thermodynamic modelling was done on a Sinclair Spectrum home computer (4MHz, Z80 processor, 64KB memory) but John Scott (in a later interview) has a more interesting description. He said Bond had linked a bunch of them together to run the calculations.  A very early version of a high performance computing array.  :o

I'd say he was pretty miffed at the RR Board and the MoD (he'll still take a pot shot at Kenneth Clarke, who was the Minister at the time).

Bond didn't have an issue with doing military research, just the bureaucracy. He's mentioned doing work on "Problems of national defense" in passing connected with hypersonics. IIRC the British were working on a reentry vehicle for ICBM's called "Chevaline" at the time. I suspect he may have been involved with that, but I doubt he will be any more specific.
« Last Edit: 12/26/2017 08:41 AM by john smith 19 »
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