Author Topic: Single Person Spacecraft  (Read 9903 times)

Offline BrightLight

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #40 on: 10/05/2016 05:12 PM »
Small update on Flexcraft/ Single Person Spacecraft:

Neutral buoyancy tests
August 2016:


Dec. 2015:


Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #41 on: 10/06/2016 03:53 AM »
I am glad to see someone is working on the Flexcraft.

Does the Flexcraft dock using the International Docking System Standard (IDSS)?
(Some times called the NASA docking system.)

Offline BrightLight

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #42 on: 11/08/2017 08:54 PM »
Single-Person Spacecraft: Progress Toward Flight Testing (AIAA 2017-5103)
http://spacearchitect.org/pubs/pub-biblio.htm
https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2017-5103

Some advancements in the SPS project.  The paper is interesting to read.
« Last Edit: 11/08/2017 08:59 PM by BrightLight »

Offline stefan r

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #43 on: 11/09/2017 02:31 AM »
If the spacecraft is not operating in an atmosphere it gains nothing from being aerodynamic.
Likewise, a terrestrial 3-wheel vehicle probably doesn't need warp engines  :)
This vehicle was seen roaming in Manhattan:


Offline sanman

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #44 on: 11/09/2017 02:04 PM »
Some of these pictures remind me of custom-built mini-submersibles







If you can have people squeezing into such small contraptions for underwater activities, then why can't it be done for space activities?
« Last Edit: 11/09/2017 02:05 PM by sanman »

Online Stormbringer

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #45 on: 11/09/2017 02:37 PM »

In the case of 2001: A Space Odyssey, the pods were for any major work on the ship itself. For ST: TMP, the Enterprise in dry dock. But the current concept lacks a base of operations, like building construction crews that set up a command point near the area scheduled for construction.



The supporting (canon and non canon) literature often has the ST ships as having 2 or more work bees as part of a constitution class load out. Its just that budgets did not allow more general use in the shows. I think they also had portable work frames/scaffolding with mountable construction equipment for repairing more extensive damage when away from dry dock support. Sort of a mini dry dock/shipyard on the go.
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Offline Helodriver

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #46 on: 11/09/2017 03:28 PM »

In the case of 2001: A Space Odyssey, the pods were for any major work on the ship itself. For ST: TMP, the Enterprise in dry dock. But the current concept lacks a base of operations, like building construction crews that set up a command point near the area scheduled for construction.



The supporting (canon and non canon) literature often has the ST ships as having 2 or more work bees as part of a constitution class load out. Its just that budgets did not allow more general use in the shows. I think they also had portable work frames/scaffolding with mountable construction equipment for repairing more extensive damage when away from dry dock support. Sort of a mini dry dock/shipyard on the go.

They've reappeared in the new Star Trek Discovery series as well, acting as general repair and utility craft. I believe this is the first the've appeared on a Star Trek TV show, rather than a movie.

Offline Welsh Dragon

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #47 on: 11/09/2017 09:03 PM »
They've reappeared in the new Star Trek Discovery series as well, acting as general repair and utility craft. I believe this is the first the've appeared on a Star Trek TV show, rather than a movie.
Worker bees were in the opening credits of every DS9 episode from (I think) series 4 onwards.

Offline sanman

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #48 on: 11/10/2017 12:02 AM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

Offline Coastal Ron

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #49 on: 11/10/2017 12:33 AM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

Yes, we're nearly there. Autonomous movement and VR control environments are pretty much there, and we're getting close to having dexterous robot end effectors that should be much more agile and precise than human hands in space suits. Could be pretty small.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline sanman

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #50 on: 11/10/2017 01:40 AM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

Yes, we're nearly there. Autonomous movement and VR control environments are pretty much there, and we're getting close to having dexterous robot end effectors that should be much more agile and precise than human hands in space suits. Could be pretty small.

And let's not forget AI, which can allow drones to function autonomously, or semi-autonomously, including helping to fill in the blanks on input coming from the controller.

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #51 on: 11/10/2017 02:14 AM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

I suspect we will have both. People will always want to go and look for themselves.

The single person spacecraft may take 2 or 3 drones with it. The appropriate remote controls will need adding to a later version.

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #52 on: 11/10/2017 02:30 AM »
I am glad to see someone is working on the Flexcraft.

Does the Flexcraft dock using the International Docking System Standard (IDSS)?
(Some times called the NASA docking system.)

The Flexcraft test bed used to test access and exit underwater had two small doors at the back. An alternative to the NASA Docking System is the Suitport proposed for the conceptual Space Exploration Vehicle.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suitport

Offline Ludus

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #53 on: 11/10/2017 10:30 PM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

Yes, we're nearly there. Autonomous movement and VR control environments are pretty much there, and we're getting close to having dexterous robot end effectors that should be much more agile and precise than human hands in space suits. Could be pretty small.

Much Much cheaper to build and experiment on without lifesupport systems. Version one ought to be just a space camera drone with cold gas thrusters able to operate much like a regular camera drone and follow pre programmed paths or return to its home base on its own.

Online Stormbringer

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #54 on: 11/10/2017 11:03 PM »
Whats so hard about a short duration life support system? And even if it were hard (which it isn't as far as i can see compared to a long duration system) then that's what a space suit is for. An integral life support system for such a small craft would likely be a plug and play space suit backpack tank dock or 4 or six and a cabin and skivvies heater and a neatly stowed male or female pith bottle. Perhaps a boxed lunch and that's about it. The deluxe version could sport cabin humidity control for the cabin and a scrubber or two; powered by a few batteries supplemented perhaps by a solar power coat of paint or film on the windows.
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Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #55 on: 11/11/2017 03:54 AM »
Now that I think about it, why do you even need for people to be inside these things, when they could just be remote-controlled drones? Then they could be more compact and more efficient.

Yes, we're nearly there. Autonomous movement and VR control environments are pretty much there, and we're getting close to having dexterous robot end effectors that should be much more agile and precise than human hands in space suits. Could be pretty small.

Much Much cheaper to build and experiment on without lifesupport systems. Version one ought to be just a space camera drone with cold gas thrusters able to operate much like a regular camera drone and follow pre programmed paths or return to its home base on its own.

NASA is working on those as well, for instance the SPHERES robots have already flow inside the ISS.

Online Stormbringer

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Re: Single Person Spacecraft
« Reply #56 on: 11/11/2017 02:07 PM »
Those are only good for light saber practice. :)
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