Author Topic: The different variants of Atlas boosters  (Read 95190 times)

Offline WallE

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 224
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #220 on: 08/17/2017 08:17 PM »
Atlas Centaur didn't fly from Vandenberg AFB at the time, so it was much easier to use the existing radio-guidance assets for Atlas H.

That is quite possible considering they would have had to modify the Centaur guidance system for West Coast launches and I guess nobody wanted to bother with that.

Offline RedTail48

  • Member
  • Posts: 25
  • Australia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #221 on: 08/18/2017 08:57 AM »
See in the Topic "Original Peter Hunter Photo Collections." Follow the Dropbox link to Atlas. Follow that down to the Folder "02 Flight Database." Within that download the "02_4_by_lveh.pdf" file. As a header to each variant you will see specs for each variant including solid upper stage details...

Offline Michel Van

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 151
  • Liege, Belgium
  • Liked: 36
  • Likes Given: 78
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #222 on: 09/29/2017 04:06 PM »
There is little know story of Atlas rocket:

Booster for Dyna Soar

Boeing wanted to use Atlas-Centaur to launch X-20 into Space
under consideration was modified Atlas E ICBM with Centaur stage and a Atlas Super E - Centaur B

Atlas E Model 850-1001 booster (for Suborbital test flight of X-20 )
modified the conical forward tank head 10 ft. diameter
also Tank stiffness, skin thickness and Tank pressures and it pressurization system change to take increase loads.
the Booster section get four fins for aerodynamic stabilization during launch

Atlas E - Centaur Model 850-2001 booster (payload 6000 to 12000 lbs)
same modification except here double amount Helium in Atlas E tanks
Booster engine upgraded of 16500 lbs to 172000 lbs thrust

Modifikation on Centaur B
Tank longer to increase propellants to 40000 lbs.
Modified tank structure and it pressurization system change to take increase loads.
RL10 engines upgraded of 15000 lbs to 2000 lbs. thrust.

Atlas Super E - Centaur B Model 850-3001 Booster
same modification like Model 850-2001 booster, but stretch tanks and more reenforced structure.
336700 lbs kerolox and 40000 lbs hydrolox
the two booster engines upgraded to (total) 500000 lbs thrust and sustainer to 57000 lbs thrust.


Source
Boeing
D2-5691 Atlas Booster Trade Studies
Dyna-Soar step-1 Phase Alpha
Contract No. AF33(500)-39831
Mach 23, 1960

Offline RIB

  • Member
  • Posts: 45
  • USA
  • Liked: 6
  • Likes Given: 82
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #223 on: 10/07/2017 10:39 AM »
Is the Atlas-Dynasoar report available downline?

Offline Michel Van

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 151
  • Liege, Belgium
  • Liked: 36
  • Likes Given: 78
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #224 on: 10/09/2017 10:56 AM »
The D2-5691 Atlas Booster Trade Studies
Are online at Scott Lowther Patreon site https://www.patreon.com/user?u=197906
He offer Backkatalog sales and they are a bargain !

Offline Fequalsma

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 373
  • Liked: 9
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #225 on: 02/19/2018 08:54 PM »
Try this - https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdf/10.2514/6.1991-842

found on NTRS somethings

AIAA PAPER 91-0842
Conference Paper Liquid booster engine reuse - A recovery system
Accession Number: 91A32162
Document ID: 19910047539
Jan 01, 1991 by Von Eckroth, Wulf and Rohrkaste, Gary R. and Delurgio, Phillip R.

Sadly no PDF at NTRS.

Summary:
Quote
The paper presents the design of a recovery system for a suborbital payload of an Atlas E rocket. This program utilizes off-the-shelf and previously qualified avionics, flotation, and decelerator systems. A brief history of liquid-engine recoveries is presented first, then the system design utilizing two self-contained structurally-identical pods diametrically mounted to the thrust section is outlined. A mortar-deployed drogue and the main parachute are described, and experimental procedures are considered. Data obtained from one tricluster drop employing a cylindrical test vehicle and helicopter is analyzed, and a satisfactory load balance between the parachutes is observed.

Offline WallE

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 224
  • Liked: 47
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: The different variants of Atlas boosters
« Reply #226 on: 05/18/2018 06:04 PM »
Gambit-1 accounted for 28 launches including 2 failures.  GATV flew 6 times, with two frustrating launch failures but also scored the first orbital docking missions with Gemini.  Five highly successful Lunar Orbiters were launched for NASA without a hitch.  Midas/RTS-1 flew three times, advancing missile detection technology despite one ending up in an unplanned elliptical orbit.  Three ATS launches were performed for NASA, with one falling short of a full GTO due to an Agena failure.  Mariner 5 was successfully launched toward Venus on the final Mariner/Agena flight.

The two failed GAMBITs were 4012 and 4020. It has been often reported that 4012 suffered an Agena engine explosion, but in fact there was an electrical short that resulted in engine cutoff after only 1.5 seconds of operation. Investigation into the failure found that two screws on a terminal connector had broken off at the factory and were never found. The investigative team concluded that the screws lodged in some area where they produced a short.

As for 4020, that was an Atlas failure--the programmer issued inadvertent cutoff commands to both the boosters and sustainer engine at staging. It is not clear if the booster was destructed by Range Safety action. A newspaper account from 1965 has an Air Force spokesman saying it was intentionally destroyed, but GD/A docs do not mention any deliberate destruct of the vehicle, nor do released histories of the GAMBIT program (the Perry history merely describes a "680 mile ballistic arc into the ocean"). I'm inclined to say no RSO action occurred and it simply pinwheeled its way down into the ocean just like numerous other Atlas flights with a premature sustainer cutoff. As a result of the failure, modifications were made to the programmer to reduce the risk of malfunctions caused by vibration during booster jettison.

The first GATV Agena suffered an engine explosion at ignition; this was found to be the result of using a fuel-first engine start to prevent loss of oxidizer during the several week-long operating life of the stage and inadequate ground testing by Lockheed. As a result, GATV vehicles switched to using the oxidizer-first start sequence used on standard Agena Ds, also experience with hypergol engines in the Titan and Agena programs showed that an oxidizer-first start resulted in smoother combustion and fewer problems with start transients.

GATV #3 of course had the Atlas pinwheel around from a flight control failure caused by apparent cryo leakage shorting wiring and end up in the Atlantic.

ATS-2 was left in an improper orbit when the Agena oxidizer isolation valve failed to close following orbital injection and the stage could not be restarted as the open valve left the turbopump flooded with propellant. The satellite still managed to complete some of its experiments and remained in orbit for two years.
« Last Edit: 05/18/2018 07:38 PM by WallE »

Tags: