Author Topic: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system  (Read 3869 times)

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« on: 12/03/2015 10:32 PM »
http://freebeacon.com/national-security/russia-conducts-successful-flight-test-of-anti-satellite-missile/

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  Russia carried out the first successful flight test of a new anti-satellite missile this month, marking a new phase in the global militarization of space. The flight test of Russia’s direct ascent anti-satellite missile, known as Nudol, took place Nov. 18, according to defense officials familiar with reports of the test. It was the first successful test in three attempts, said officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.                           




Offline Prof68

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #1 on: 12/07/2015 04:38 AM »
Most sources define Nudol missile as a part of the new generation of Russian anti-ICBM system A-235. Its anti-satellite capabilities are secondary and very limited, if exists at all.

Offline Liss

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #2 on: 08/21/2016 09:48 AM »
As of Nudol, there's an interesting side note on the source of the name.
In the beginning there was a small river called Nudol, an afluente of Istra, some 100 km east of Moscow, and a township (or a large village) of the same name built on it.
In 1950s, an S-25 Berkut anti-aircraft system position was built near Nudol, and in 1970s, two start positions for the A-35M ABM system were built alongside. Their military personnel live in a township called Klin-10, some 2 km north of Nudol itself.
In 1994, the Klin-10 position was converted into the Russia Central Bank Satellite Communcations Center, and the former Klin-10 township was renamed as Narynka.
Yet the old name lived in hearts of the Russian ABM officers, and in 2000s it made a rebirth as the name of the A-235 system.

And the Nudol river still flows...

« Last Edit: 08/21/2016 09:49 AM by Liss »
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #3 on: 12/21/2016 08:52 PM »
http://freebeacon.com/national-security/russia-conducts-fifth-test-new-anti-satellite-missile/

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Russia Conducts Fifth Test of New Anti-Satellite Missile

Third successful flight test of satellite-killing weapon

BY: Bill Gertz    
December 21, 2016 5:00 am

Russia successfully flight tested a new missile capable of knocking out strategic U.S. communications and navigation satellites, according to Pentagon officials. The test of the PL-19 Nudol missile was carried out Dec. 16 from a base in central Russia, and was monitored by U.S. intelligence agencies. It was the fifth test of the Nudol missile and the third successful flight of a system Moscow has claimed is for use against enemy missiles, said officials familiar with the reports of the launch. The exact location of the flight test was not disclosed. Earlier tests of the missile took place from a facility near Plesetsk, located 500 miles north of Moscow. It could not be learned if the Nudol was sent into space or fired in a sub-orbital trajectory.

Pentagon spokeswoman Lt. Col. Michelle Baldanza declined to comment. “We generally don’t comment on other countries’ capabilities,” she said.

Earlier tests took place May 24 and Nov. 18, 2015. Both tests were first reported by the Washington Free Beacon.

The high rate of testing is an indication the program is a military priority and is progressing toward deployment.
The new anti-satellite missile is among several new strategic weapons systems being developed by the Russian military. The Nudol is viewed by the Pentagon as a so-called “direct ascent” anti-satellite missile. Russia, however, has sought to mask the missile’s anti-satellite capabilities by claiming the missile is for defense against incoming ballistic missiles.

The Pentagon is worried about the development of anti-satellite weapons by both Russia and China. Gen. John Hyten, the commander of Air Force Space Command who was recently promoted to lead Strategic Command, has stated that Russia and China are building space warfare systems that are worrying. “They are developing capabilities that concern us,” Hyten has said.

In March, Air Force Lt. Gen. David J. Buck, commander of the Joint Functional Component Command for Space, revealed during House testimony that the Russian military is developing weapons with “counter-space capabilities.” “Russia views U.S. dependency on space as an exploitable vulnerability, and they are taking delite actions to strengthen their counter-space capabilities,” Buck said.

Mark Schneider, a former Pentagon strategic arms policymaker, said the current asymmetry between the United States and other nations in anti-satellite capabilities “is of enormous significance.” “Potentially, it could result in our defeat in a high intensity conflict,” Schneider said. “The complete loss of the GPS network, or its serious degradation, would eliminate the effectiveness of all existing long-range conventional strike cruise missiles and would degrade the functioning of many of our precision guided weapons.” Anti-satellite missiles also could be used to knock out communications satellites. “We have begun to take some steps to reduce our reliance on GPS but this will not be near term,” Schneider said.

Michaela Dodge, a defense analyst at the Heritage Foundation, said the Russian test highlights the growing threat to space from new weapons. “The test demonstrates the need for the United States to treat space as an increasingly contested environment where access might not be guaranteed as it has been in the past,” she said.
“It demonstrates the need to exercise scenarios in which U.S. military might not have a complete access to its complete utilization,” Dodge added. “The test also illustrates the need to protect and diversify U.S. space infrastructure.”

U.S. intelligence agencies have estimated that U.S. military operations could be severely disrupted with only two dozen or so anti-satellite attacks. Satellites are used for precision navigation, targeting, and communications and intelligence gathering. The Pentagon is very dependent on satellites for long-range warfare operations, an American military specialty. Both Russia and China have recognized the strategic vulnerability of U.S. dependency on satellites. Anti-satellite missiles are regarded as important asymmetric warfare weapons.

Both China and Russia are developing lasers and other directed-energy weapons that can blind or disrupt satellites. Small satellites capable of maneuvering in space and grabbing and crushing satellites also are being developed. Russian generals have mentioned their forces fielding anti-satellite capabilities in public statements, but with few details. For example, Russian Lt. Gen. Oleg Ostapenko, former commander of space forces, has said the S-500 anti-missile system is capable of hitting “low-orbit satellites and space weapons.”

In May, Vadim Kozyulin, a professor at the Academy of Military Sciences, was quoted as saying that discussion of “space kamikazes” suggests Moscow is preparing for a conflict in space with the United States.

The TASS news agency reported that the A-60, a variation of the IL-76 transport aircraft, has a laser anti-satellite capability. In October, TASS reported that the Nudol is called the A-235 and is being developed to replace the current nuclear-tipped missile defense system ringing Moscow. Missile defense interceptors share characteristics with space-faring satellite killers. Both travel at high rates of speed and require precision targeting and guidance.

The United States has no anti-satellite weapons. However, a Navy SM-3 anti-missile interceptor was modified to shoot down a de-orbiting intelligence satellite in 2008, indicating U.S. missile defenses could be used to target foreign satellites.The Defense Intelligence Agency stated in a report to Congress last year that Russia leaders “openly assert that the Russian armed forces have anti-satellite weapons and conduct anti-satellite research.”
China conducted a flight test of its new anti-satellite missile in early December. Preparations for the test were first reported by the Free Beacon.The missile was identified as a DN-3 direct ascent missile. That system, like the Russian Nudol, is being developed under cover as a missile-defense weapon. China’s Defense Ministry said the Free Beacon report of test preparations for the DN-3 was “groundless.”

Offline hkultala

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #4 on: 12/21/2016 09:06 PM »
It seems that the writer of the last article does not understand the difference between
1) suborbital space
2) LEO
3) MEO
4) GEO

I've heard no credible source saying nudol can reach 18Mm (height of Navstar satellites) or 36 Mm, but this article talks about it killing GPS asatellites or US military communication satellites.


Offline B. Hendrickx

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #5 on: 12/21/2016 09:42 PM »
It seems that the writer of the last article does not understand the difference between
1) suborbital space
2) LEO
3) MEO
4) GEO

I've heard no credible source saying nudol can reach 18Mm (height of Navstar satellites) or 36 Mm, but this article talks about it killing GPS asatellites or US military communication satellites.

The Pentagon and Air Force officials quoted in the article are probably referring not only to Nudol, but also to other ASAT capabilities being developed by Russia. It has been widely rumored that three mysterious piggyback payloads launched by the Rokot launch vehicle in 2013-2015 (Kosmos-2491, 2499 and 2504) may have been tests of some type of ASAT system. These objects were not placed into the high orbits used by GPS and comsats, but could potentially target these satellite constellations if launched by heavier launch vehicles. Interestingly, Kosmos-2499 is mentioned in a CNN report on the recent ASAT test. Unlike the Washington Free Beacon article, the CNN report does not specifically link the recent test to the Nudol system.

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/12/21/politics/russia-satellite-weapon-test/index.html

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Sources: Russia tests anti-satellite weapon
By Jim Sciutto, Ryan Browne and Barbara Starr, CNN
Updated 1712 GMT (0112 HKT) December 21, 2016

(CNN)Russia has recently tested what is believed to be an anti-satellite weapon, US sources with knowledge of the test told CNN.

The US tracked the weapon and it did not create debris, indicating it did not destroy a target, the source said.
The Russian test, coming as President-elect Donald Trump prepares to enter the White House next month, could be seen as a provocative demonstration of Moscow's capability in space.

Russia has demonstrated the ability to launch anti-satellite weapons in the past, including its Nudol missile.
US military officials have expressed concerns about Russia's burgeoning anti-satellite arsenal, as the US has become increasingly dependent on satellites for both military and commercial uses.

US officials believe Russia has also deployed what could be kamikaze satellites, known as "Kosmos 2499," which are designed to sidle up to American satellites and, if ordered, destroy or disable them. "We have very good surveillance and intelligence capabilities, so we can see the threats that are being built," Gen. John Hyten, the commander of US Strategic command, told CNN in November. "So we're developing capabilities to defend ourselves."

Russia is not alone in the development of these type of weapons. China has conducted similar tests, destroying an old weather satellite in 2007 -- a move analysts saw as indicative of China's growing military capability.
The US has also destroyed a satellites in space, obliterating one with a missile in 2008 after American officials said the satellite's orbital decay posed a risk.

Capt. Nicholas Mercurio, a spokesman for the command that oversees US space operations, declined to comment on the report of a Russian anti-satellite weapon test.

Offline weedenbc

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #6 on: 12/22/2016 12:00 AM »
What I'm interested in is whether the Nudol is a replacement for the Gorgon or Gazelle missiles that were part of the old A-135 system. If it's a replacement for the endoatmospheric Gorgon, that makes it much less capable as an ASAT than if it's a replacement for the exoatmospheric Gazelle.

This article seems to hint that it's a Gorgon replacement, but it's not conclusive:
http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Frbth.com%2Fdefence%2F2016%2F06%2F23%2Frussia-successfully-tests-new-missile-for-defense-system-near-moscow_605711&h=lAQFNau1m
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Brian Weeden

Offline catdlr

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Re: Russia tests Nudol ASAT system
« Reply #7 on: 05/21/2017 03:50 AM »
Russia has reawakened 3 mystery satellites — and no one knows what they are for

http://www.businessinsider.com/russian-satellites-that-could-be-equipped-lasers-explosives-are-move-again-2017-5

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Three Russian satellites that were sent into low orbit in 2013 are on the move again, and no one knows what they are for, The Daily Beast reports.

Having been idle for more than a year, one of the satellites went hundreds of meters off its orbit last month to within 1,200 meters of a piece of a Chinese weather satellite that China smashed in a 2007 anti-satellite rocket test.

The Daily Beast: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/05/19/russias-killer-satellites-re-awaken


« Last Edit: 05/21/2017 03:51 AM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

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