Author Topic: LIVE: SpaceX Falcon 9 FT - ORBCOMM-2 - SLC-40 - Dec 21, 2015 - UPDATES  (Read 385700 times)

Offline Lars-J

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...They also added some launch pictures:
« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 06:07 PM by Lars-J »

Offline Eagandale4114

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...They also added some launch pictures:

I think your last upload had issues. Its mostly greyed out for me.

Offline Antilope7724

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...They also added some launch pictures:

I think your last upload had issues. Its mostly greyed out for me.

I thought that was a closeup of the new two-tone grey and white paint scheme.  ;D

Online Jakusb

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Any transcript or even audio of Elon's press conf call that seems to have taken place last night?

Offline NovaSilisko

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...They also added some launch pictures:

I think your last upload had issues. Its mostly greyed out for me.

It is in the thumbnail for me, but full-size is fine.

Offline Ludus

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I notice how regular the band of carbon dark is on the base with the sharp outline of where the landing legs were folded. Curious why it would seem to end so cleanly at the top? Is there a ring or something there that would deflect flame?

Offline Herb Schaltegger

I notice how regular the band of carbon dark is on the base with the sharp outline of where the landing legs were folded. Curious why it would seem to end so cleanly at the top? Is there a ring or something there that would deflect flame?

Given how sharp that transition is, I'm reasonably certain there is an ablative coating used on the lower fuselage of Stage 1 from the thrust structure up to well above the tops of the legs. I don't think "icing" explains the clean nature of the transition fully.
« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 06:42 PM by Herb Schaltegger »
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Offline ChrisC

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I notice how regular the band of carbon dark is on the base with the sharp outline of where the landing legs were folded. Curious why it would seem to end so cleanly at the top? Is there a ring or something there that would deflect flame?

Discussed above, check earlier pages.  LOX tank icing.

Let's continue to try to bring this back to updates only, folks.  See the discussion thread.

FYI Lars-J fixed his image embed. No need to point out that it's working for you.
« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 06:35 PM by ChrisC »
How to embed photos from outside sources (e.g. Twitter)
NASA TV in HD:  history and FAQ (from 2007-2010 startup period)

Offline mwfair

Here's a transcription of the numbers:

F9 Orbcomm-2 launch  12/21/2015 20:29 EDT (+23:00 in youtube.com / watch?v=O5bTbVbe4e4)
time        alt  speed range  note
            km   mps   km
UTC 01:29:00  0   0   0
+0:00:25     1   84    ?
+0:00:34     2   131   ?
+0:00:41     3   169   ?
+0:01:00     7   301   ?
+0:01:20     17  550   2
+0:02:00     43  1113  11
+0:02:00     48  1200  11
+0:02:25     75  1670  50  MECO
+0:02:34     89  1590  50  MVAC
+0:03:00    128  1570 
+0:04:00    212  1630 
+0:05:00    296  1840 
+0:06:00    380  2280 
+0:07:00    467  3040 
+0:08:00    552  4330 
+0:09:00    610  6450 
+0:09:27    619  7220 
+0:13:00    623  7215 
+0:14:00    625  7212 
+0:16:00    627  7209 
+0:18:00    630  7206 
+0:20:00    632  7204 
time         events
+0:0?:??     supersonic
+0:0?:??     maxQ
+0:02:26    MECO / sep
+0:02:34     MVAC  ignition
+0:02:46     Flip
+0:02:52     fairing 
+0:03:50     boostback 
+0:04:20     boost cutoff 
+0:04:36     ?? aquisition
+0:08:02     reentry
+0:08:12     reentry burn
+0:08:40     reentry cutoff
+0:09:11     landing burn
+0:09:27     SECO   657x611 inc:47d
+0:09:49     touchdown
+0:14:26     deploy1,2
+0:15:37     deploy3,4
+0:16:16     deploy5,6
+0:17:22     deploy7,8

errors maybe fixed: inclination,
« Last Edit: 12/23/2015 12:18 AM by mwfair »
Mike Fair

Offline Chris Bergin

OK! So....I've been told there is amazing footage - that will hopefully be released - of the Falcon 9 OG2 S1 external camera view of the stage sep, boost back, reentry burn and landing!

Let's hope SpaceX release it (no I've not seen it myself).
« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 07:36 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline Maciej Olesinski

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Online ugordan

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Wow, fancy seeing the NASA KSC channel posting footage of a non-NASA launch. From the VAB roof, I'd say:



And the landing!

« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 08:40 PM by ugordan »

Offline Lee Jay

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http://www.sncorp.com/AboutUs/NewsDetails/2499

SPARKS, Nev. (Dec. 22, 2015) – Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has successfully completed the solar array deployment and initial on-orbit checkout phase as planned for all 11 satellites launched for ORBCOMM’s Generation 2 (OG2) Mission 2. The communication satellites were launched on December 21, 2015 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on a dedicated SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.  The launch utilized an innovative configuration of three stacked EELV Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) Grande rings to carry the eleven satellites to orbit.

“The initial results of the on-orbit performance of the spacecraft have met or exceeded our performance criteria,” said Mark N. Sirangelo, corporate vice president of SNC’s Space Systems. “I would like to thank all the members of our spacecraft systems team as well as our payload subcontractor, Boeing, for delivering this next-generation satellite system.   We also want to express our appreciation to ORBCOMM for this opportunity to provide these 17 satellites over the past year and two launches, allowing them to offer their subscribers a more enhanced and efficient network capacity. We are proud to have led such an extraordinary team for the OG2 program and to enable this next generation constellation mission.”

SNC is the prime contractor and spacecraft bus manufacturer for OG2, completing all design, manufacturing and integration at SNC’s facility in Louisville, Colorado. The first six OG2 mission satellites were launched on July 14, 2045. Once the final 11 satellites are phased into their final orbital positions, the constellation will be complete.

Similar to management of the 2014 launch, SNC will provide ORBCOMM on-orbit servicing and operations support from SNC’s Satellite Operations Center in Louisville, Colorado, in addition to on-site support at the ORBCOMM Network Control Center in Sterling, Virginia.

“We'd like to thank SNC for their hard work and dedication to making this mission a success,” said Marc Eisenberg, ORBCOMM’s chief executive officer. “We are pleased with the initial operation of the spacecraft and look forward to integrating the recently-launched satellites into the constellation. This launch solidifies the exponential growth of ORBCOMM’s network capacity.”

All OG2 spacecraft are based on SNC’s flight-proven SN-100 satellite bus, which can be tailored to support a variety of applications, including communication, Earth observation, weather and space science. The SN-100 is designed for a five-year-minimum life and utilizes a modular payload deck that can be rapidly integrated and tested using highly automated scripts to test all functions. This allows the baseline satellite to be quickly and cost-effectively configured to meet the needs of many customers.
« Last Edit: 12/22/2015 08:56 PM by Lee Jay »

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Any orbital tracking data yet on the eleven spacecraft launched?
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Offline pericynthion

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Yes, they're on Space Track in 613 x 657 km x 47 degree orbit.

Offline parham55

Congratulations to SpaceX and ORBCOMM! You actually had my non space interested friend jumping up at down screaming at the tv. Well done.

Offline Dave G

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Any transcript or even audio of Elon's press conf call that seems to have taken place last night?
Hear, hear!

Lots of hard news from the post launch press call being reported in bits and pieces in various articles, like that fact that SpaceX will not reuse this particular stage, but they will do a test static fire on it very soon.

How much more have we not heard from this post launch press call?  It would be real nice to hear the whole thing.

For me, the landing is just the beginning.  The interesting part is what happens to the stage after landing...
« Last Edit: 12/23/2015 03:11 AM by Dave G »

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Any transcript or even audio of Elon's press conf call that seems to have taken place last night?

Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline PreferToLurk

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Many thanks! Been waiting for this ever since I heard it happened.  Too bad about the wind buffering, but almost everything can still be heard.

Many of the responses were simply stock answers that have been around for a while. But after two non-answers on the cost/price of a reused booster ("fuel only costs $200k"), Elon did finally specify that Spacex is still very much aiming for literal "gas and go" reuse, and expects to get there within "a year or two". It will be interesting if they maintain this optimistic business plan after analysis of the first few returned stages.

I was also amused by Musk's anecdote about standing on the causeway, hearing the sonic boom just as the booster touched down, assuming a booster RUD, and thinking "oh well, at least we got close". Then walks back into mission control only to be greated by staff jubilation and video of the stage upright on the pad! 


Edit: Whoops, forgot this was the update thread. Well, I haven't said congrats yet, so, Congratulations SpaceX! Keep up the inspiring work!
« Last Edit: 12/23/2015 05:14 PM by PreferToLurk »

Offline MP99

Belatedly want to add my huge congrats.

Fantastic that the landing went so smoothly. Looks to me like landing accuracy means ASDS landings are fine for launches where the margins aren't so large - and that is also a fantastic result.

Let's relight this candle. (OK, not this actual candle - never expected this one to do a second orbital flight. But it's what follows once this becomes routine that has the chance to truly be exciting, and we're set on the path to that now!)

As the presenter pointed out on the night, it's all pointless unless the payload is delivered OK. Great to see RTF go so smoothly, and I think they now have the experience with the new GSE to make sub-cooling a lot less hassle for SES.

cheers, Martin

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