Author Topic: Small Satellite Missions to Study Earth  (Read 603 times)

Offline catdlr

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Small Satellite Missions to Study Earth
« on: 11/02/2016 11:23 PM »
November 02, 2016

NASA to Hold Media Call on New Small Satellite Missions to Study Earth

NASA will host a teleconference at 2:30 p.m. EST Monday, Nov. 7, to preview several Earth science missions using small satellites heading into space, starting this year, to help us better understand our home planet.

NASA has embraced the revolution in small spacecraft and satellites, from CubeSats you can hold in your hand to microsatellites the size of a small washing machine. The technology helps advance scientific and human exploration, reduces the cost of new missions, and expands access to space. The briefing will discuss NASA’s overall program, technology development initiatives, and new Earth-observing missions that use individual and constellations of small satellites to study climate change, hurricanes and clouds.

Participants in the teleconference will be:

Ellen Stofan, chief scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington
Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters
Steve Jurczyk, associate administrator for Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters
Michael Freilich, director of the Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters
Aaron Ridley, mission constellation scientist for NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor
Bill Swartz, CubeSat principal investigator for the Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) project at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland
William Blackwell, principal investigator for the Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS) mission at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge
To participate by phone, media must contact Sean Potter at 202-358-1536 or sean.potter@nasa.gov and provide their affiliation no later than 12 p.m. Monday. Media and the public may ask questions via social media with #askNASA.

Audio of the teleconference will stream live on NASA’s website at:

http://www.nasa.gov/live

For information about all of NASA’s small satellite projects, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/smallsats

-end-


Small spacecraft and satellites are helping NASA advance scientific and human exploration, reduce the cost of new space missions, and expand access to space.
Credits: NASA
« Last Edit: 11/02/2016 11:23 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Small Satellite Missions to Study Earth
« Reply #1 on: 11/07/2016 09:15 PM »
Small Sats are the Next Big Thing

NASA Goddard

Published on Nov 7, 2016
NASA is about to launch six new next-generation Earth-observing small satellites — some as small as a loaf of bread. These tiny spacecraft are helping to foster creative and cost-effective approaches to studying our planet. For more on NASA’s small satellite program:
http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-to-hold-media-call-on-new-small-satellite-missions-to-study-earth

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2nZSrSnbnE?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Small Satellite Missions to Study Earth
« Reply #2 on: 11/08/2016 02:31 AM »
NASA Small Satellites Will Take a Fresh Look at Earth

Quote
Beginning this month, NASA is launching a suite of six next-generation, Earth-observing small satellite missions to demonstrate innovative new approaches for studying our changing planet.

These small satellites range in size from a loaf of bread to a small washing machine and weigh from a few to 400 pounds (180 kilograms). Their small size keeps development and launch costs down as they often hitch a ride to space as a "secondary payload" on another mission's rocket -- providing an economical avenue for testing new technologies and conducting science.

"NASA is increasingly using small satellites to tackle important science problems across our mission portfolio," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. "They also give us the opportunity to test new technological innovations in space and broaden the involvement of students and researchers to get hands-on experience with space systems."


source: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?feature=6671

Photo:
One of eight microsatellites in the CYGNSS constellation under construction. The mission will collect data to improve hurricane intensity forecasts. Credit: University of Michigan
Tony De La Rosa

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