Author Topic: Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs  (Read 20294 times)

Offline Star One

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Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs
« Reply #140 on: 11/06/2016 06:57 PM »
FAST isn't "active radar telescope".

Yes but that's not its primary job is it, that's just a secondary function. It's primarily a radio telescope the same as FAST, so why list it under a secondary function other than trying to make it sound more important.
« Last Edit: 11/06/2016 06:58 PM by Star One »

Offline as58

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Re: Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs
« Reply #141 on: 11/06/2016 07:04 PM »
FAST isn't "active radar telescope".

Yes but that's not its primary job is it, that's just a secondary function. It's primarily a radio telescope the same as FAST, so why list it under a secondary function other than trying to make it sound more important.

I think the radar is used a lot, at least for asteroid observations (a plain radio telescope can't really do anything for asteroid science). Does anyone know actual usage statistics?

Speaking of trying to make something sound more important: I don't think FAST is quite as revolutionary step as some of the recent media coverage has made it appear.


Offline Star One

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Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs
« Reply #142 on: 11/06/2016 07:10 PM »
FAST isn't "active radar telescope".

Yes but that's not its primary job is it, that's just a secondary function. It's primarily a radio telescope the same as FAST, so why list it under a secondary function other than trying to make it sound more important.

I think the radar is used a lot, at least for asteroid observations (a plain radio telescope can't really do anything for asteroid science). Does anyone know actual usage statistics?

Speaking of trying to make something sound more important: I don't think FAST is quite as revolutionary step as some of the recent media coverage has made it appear.

Do you mean in the sense that modern radio facilities are moving in the direction of being made up of networks of smaller dishes sometimes spread over geographically great distances.
« Last Edit: 11/06/2016 07:10 PM by Star One »

Offline as58

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Re: Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs
« Reply #143 on: 11/06/2016 07:20 PM »
FAST isn't "active radar telescope".

Yes but that's not its primary job is it, that's just a secondary function. It's primarily a radio telescope the same as FAST, so why list it under a secondary function other than trying to make it sound more important.

I think the radar is used a lot, at least for asteroid observations (a plain radio telescope can't really do anything for asteroid science). Does anyone know actual usage statistics?

Speaking of trying to make something sound more important: I don't think FAST is quite as revolutionary step as some of the recent media coverage has made it appear.

Do you mean in the sense that modern radio facilities are moving in the direction of being made up of networks of smaller dishes sometimes spread over geographically great distances.

Yes, at radio wavelengths interferometry works very well and generally the biggest new instruments are going to be interferometers (e.g., ALMA, SKA).

Offline Star One

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Re: Another reminder of the ever present threat of NEOs
« Reply #144 on: 11/06/2016 07:29 PM »
FAST isn't "active radar telescope".

Yes but that's not its primary job is it, that's just a secondary function. It's primarily a radio telescope the same as FAST, so why list it under a secondary function other than trying to make it sound more important.

I think the radar is used a lot, at least for asteroid observations (a plain radio telescope can't really do anything for asteroid science). Does anyone know actual usage statistics?

Speaking of trying to make something sound more important: I don't think FAST is quite as revolutionary step as some of the recent media coverage has made it appear.

Do you mean in the sense that modern radio facilities are moving in the direction of being made up of networks of smaller dishes sometimes spread over geographically great distances.

Yes, at radio wavelengths interferometry works very well and generally the biggest new instruments are going to be interferometers (e.g., ALMA, SKA).

On that topic I am looking forward to seeing the results of the event horizon telescope next year.

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