Author Topic: Save Atlas 5A (56-6742) rocket from being scrapped - Campaign and Fundraiser  (Read 45246 times)

Offline Helodriver

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I consider this an NSF crowdsourced effort. One person, me, is not going to be able to pull this off alone, although I can devote significant time to it. Any and all ideas are welcomed as well as people willing to leverage their contacts.

Online Chris Bergin

Tory Bruno ‏@torybruno  6m6 minutes ago
@NASASpaceflight @srepetsk @Helodriver2004 If you guys message me contact info, I'll connect you to my people.

Offline Kansan52

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From the reporter:

Thanks for your note. There is in fact a chance that a science centre in
Tennessee called Discovery Park America may try to get it. We have a story
running probably later today online. The issues: Getting permission from
the USAF, which owns the rocket, and figuring out transportation. But stay
tuned

Online kevin-rf

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More a question, this is the only surviving A model and thus the oldest surviving Atlas. Is that correct?

I think that should be pointed out in attempts to save the Atlas.
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline Rocket Science

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"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline edkyle99

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More a question, this is the only surviving A model and thus the oldest surviving Atlas. Is that correct?

I think that should be pointed out in attempts to save the Atlas.
There is another, 8A, at the SAC Museum, but it has been modified.  5A is the only one in the original "as-built" condition.

 - Ed Kyle 

Offline mike robel

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Why not attempt to get the Cosmosphere in Hutchison in on this?  They have V-2 stuff, but little or nothing about US rocketry, other than in support of HSF, as I recall.

I shall now go to KickStarter.

Offline Barrie

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Jeff Bezos and Steve Jurvetson seem willing to spend money on this kind of thing, but it will be even nicer if ULA step up to the plate.  I made a pledge just in case.

Offline david1971

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Offline JH

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I like the idea of doing a kickstarter, but I think you need to provide some explanation for how the money is going to be spent. $100k is a large number and there currently isn't any justification for the it other than (I assume) that it is probably enough. Keep in mind that kickstarters are only funded if they reach 100% of the target, so it is better to ask for a smaller number than a larger one.

Another important consideration is that most successful kickstarter campaigns have a video. It doesn't have to be the slickest thing in the world, but it also shouldn't be recorded in a darkened room with a phone camera. Clips from the early days of rocketry and a sincere appeal that explains the importance both of America's space program and of this rocket in particular would probably go a LONG way towards motivating people (other than those on this site, who don't really need to be convinced) to donate.

If you do that, you can send links to tech sites (gizmodo, etc.), even (heaven forbid) make a post on reddit. While those communities are not as dedicated to space, they do often hop on bandwagons that they think are quirky and cool. Saving one of the oldest intact rockets ever made in America from destruction might pique their interest.

Offline Kansan52

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Why not attempt to get the Cosmosphere in Hutchison in on this?  They have V-2 stuff, but little or nothing about US rocketry, other than in support of HSF, as I recall.

I shall now go to KickStarter.

As a member so no power, the are in fundraiser to revamp the museum so there seems little money available from them.

But if the things fall into place to save the missile, I am certainly willing to approach them.

Offline Kansan52

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From the museum:

Dear Mr. McCue:

Thank you for contacting The Canada Science and Technology Museum about the dismantling of the Atlas rocket.

You should know that the Museum does not own the rocket. It is the property of the United States Air Force (USAF) on loan to the Museum.

There are several reasons why we need to dismantle the rocket now. The main reason is safety.

Over the years, weathering has caused the condition of the rocket to deteriorate. It has not been air tight for many years, and a compressor is required to maintain its internal pressure and prevent it from collapsing in on itself.

As its deterioration becomes more severe, practical solutions are running out. The internal pressure of the rocket must be maintained to prevent it from crumpling -- and potentially injuring visitors to Technology Park.

The USAF has indicated it does not want the Atlas Rocket returned, and has provided strict instructions about the manner of its disposal. Under these terms, the Museum is not permitted to keep or repurpose any pieces of the rocket.

Please be reassured that the Museum is committed to preserving and protecting Canada’s scientific and technological heritage, while also promoting, celebrating, and sharing knowledge of that heritage and how it affects the daily lives of Canadians.

Any decision about the disposition of the Atlas rocket will be made by the United States Air Force. If the USAF should decide to make the rocket, or parts of it, available to another institution we will do what we can to facilitate the transfer.

Sincerely,
Caroline Desabrais
Communications & Marketing Officer
Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation /
Société des musées de sciences et technologies du Canada

Offline Rocket Science

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Bump: I'm in for 100 bucks, the cat and I can diet a bit for a worthy cause... ;D

Please help anyway you can! :)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/287720970/save-the-atlas
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline Rocket Science

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Morning check in... Waiting for that safety fence to protect the public to go up, as it all about safety you know...  If we can’t raise funds to immediately move the Atlas, I propose our funds go towards erecting a barrier in order to give us more time to work out matters with USAF, ULA and some future home for her...

http://www.modu-loc.ca/en/
« Last Edit: 02/21/2015 03:26 PM by Rocket Science »
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline arachnitect

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My two cents: after begging Ottawa for time, the highest priority is to find a stretch frame or figure out how to fabricate one. If the rocket is stable and (theoretically) transportable, finding it a new home gets much easier.

I'd say the second priority is convincing USAF to at least let it be disassembled and crated rather than brutally shredded.

The idea that someone is gonna build an operational ICBM based on an Atlas A is bizarre; better technology has long been available to pretty much anybody.

edit: I accidentally a word
« Last Edit: 02/21/2015 05:42 PM by arachnitect »

Offline Rocket Science

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My two cents: after from begging Ottawa for time, the highest priority is to find a stretch frame or figure out how to fabricate one. If the rocket is stable and (theoretically) transportable, finding it a new home gets much easier.

I'd say the second priority is convincing USAF to at least let it be disassembled and crated rather than brutally shredded.

The idea that someone is gonna build an operational ICBM based on an Atlas A is bizarre; better technology has long been available to pretty much anybody.
What you are describing from what I can understand is a strongback. Now it can be left in place or be used to lower the Atlas on to a flat bed trailer. I see this as a phase 2, since we need to address their public safety concerns with a barrier and then such a structure is erected.  All this is “if” the museum allows/wants to let it now be safely displayed... Or we could fund repairs and a compressor. I still feel they just want it gone ASAP....
« Last Edit: 02/21/2015 05:38 PM by Rocket Science »
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Offline arachnitect

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My two cents: after from begging Ottawa for time, the highest priority is to find a stretch frame or figure out how to fabricate one. If the rocket is stable and (theoretically) transportable, finding it a new home gets much easier.

I'd say the second priority is convincing USAF to at least let it be disassembled and crated rather than brutally shredded.

The idea that someone is gonna build an operational ICBM based on an Atlas A is bizarre; better technology has long been available to pretty much anybody.
What you are describing from what I can understand is a strongback. Now it can be left in place or be used to lower the Atlas on to a flat bed trailer. I see this as a phase 2, since we need to address their public safety concerns with a barrier and then such a structure is erected.  All this is “if” the museum allows/wants to let it now be safely displayed... Or we could fund repairs and a compressor. I still feel they just want it gone ASAP....

It's more specific than just a strongback. I don't know exactly how it works but the stretch frame puts the fuselage in tension so that it holds its shape without pressurization. There's hydraulics involved.

Offline Rocket Science

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My two cents: after from begging Ottawa for time, the highest priority is to find a stretch frame or figure out how to fabricate one. If the rocket is stable and (theoretically) transportable, finding it a new home gets much easier.

I'd say the second priority is convincing USAF to at least let it be disassembled and crated rather than brutally shredded.

The idea that someone is gonna build an operational ICBM based on an Atlas A is bizarre; better technology has long been available to pretty much anybody.
What you are describing from what I can understand is a strongback. Now it can be left in place or be used to lower the Atlas on to a flat bed trailer. I see this as a phase 2, since we need to address their public safety concerns with a barrier and then such a structure is erected.  All this is “if” the museum allows/wants to let it now be safely displayed... Or we could fund repairs and a compressor. I still feel they just want it gone ASAP....

It's more specific than just a strongback. I don't know exactly how it works but the stretch frame puts the fuselage in tension so that it holds its shape without pressurization. There's hydraulics involved.
Yes, it would have to be in tension. I see it basically as the transporter structure less the wheels.  Dismantling sounds interesting but tricky, especially with 40 plus years of corrosion... It might be safer to leave it intact.... If there is an available original transporter that we could borrow that is still roadworthy, that might be an option. .... Let’s all keep brainstorming and not rule out anything... :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline Jim

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there are existing purpose built trailers for this task that can be found

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=36772.msg1332515#msg1332515
« Last Edit: 02/21/2015 06:29 PM by Jim »

Offline Rocket Science

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« Last Edit: 02/21/2015 07:14 PM by Rocket Science »
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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