Author Topic: Save Atlas 5A (56-6742) rocket from being scrapped - Campaign and Fundraiser  (Read 46608 times)

Online John-H

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Liked: 31
  • Likes Given: 77
The  Atlas rocket in front of the science museum in Ottawa is coming down. Despite the extremely light  balloon tank structure, it has stood upright, out in the weather  for over 40 years. Are there any other such rockets preserved?

 The museum itself has suffered from years of neglect and is now closed because  the roof leaks.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/science-and-tech-museum-will-lose-rocket-pumpjack

John
---

UPDATE. THIS IS NOW A CAMPAIGN.

Someone had to do something.


A Kickstarter campaign had been launched by me.

Spread the word. Widely.

The monies collected (if any) will be 100% used to stop the vehicle's imminent destruction and to transport it to a suitable home at a yet to be determined location.

The main point of this campaign is to demonstrate to the powers that be, the National Museum of the USAF and the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology the the public cares about this vehicle and to hold off the bulldozers and torches and fund the maintenance of the vehicle in its current state until a proper move can be accomplished.

If you cannot donate I completely understand. No one has deep pockets for this sort of thing. If you cannot donate then call/message the USAF museum and the Canadian museum to tell them to hold off destruction.

Public outcry backed up with a plan is the only thing that's going to save this Atlas from the scrapper.

Thanks.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/287720970/save-the-atlas
« Last Edit: 02/20/2015 06:25 PM by Chris Bergin »

Online Ronpur50

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1914
  • Brandon, FL
  • Liked: 748
  • Likes Given: 1494
That is sad.  Maybe they could sell the pieces of the Atlas for a fundraiser.

Offline Rocket Science

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7952
  • NASA Educator Astronaut Candidate Applicant 2002
  • Liked: 2157
  • Likes Given: 5101
They could try pumping the tanks full of expanding urethane foam to stabilize the rocket for display...
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline Paul Adams

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 493
  • United Kingdom and USA
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 23
That is a good idea - and does no one else want it? What about for the new space wing going up at the Air Force museum in Ohio?
It's all in the data.

Offline Rocket Science

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7952
  • NASA Educator Astronaut Candidate Applicant 2002
  • Liked: 2157
  • Likes Given: 5101
That is a good idea - and does no one else want it? What about for the new space wing going up at the Air Force museum in Ohio?
Maybe, they don't show an Atlas. It's always about money...

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/exhibits/missile/index.asp
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8515
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1026
  • Likes Given: 235
I thought back in the 90's the Atlas at the Air Force Museum had was setup outdoors and was struct by lightning causing it depressurize and collapse. I vaguely recall something about that years ago.

I might be wrong, but wiki on currently displayed Atlas's
Quote
HGM-16F Atlas is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. For years the missile was displayed outside the museum. In 1998 it was removed from display. It was restored by the museum's restoration staff and returned to display in the museum's new Missile Silo Gallery in 2007. The white nose cone atop the museum's Atlas is an AVCO IV re-entry vehicle built to contain a nuclear warhead. This nose cone actually stood alert in defense of the United States, as it was initially installed on an Atlas on 2 October 1962 at a Denton Valley launch site near Clyde, Texas.
(The National Museum of the United States Air Force does not have an Atlas on display currently; they do have two in storage, these are visible on the Behind the Scenes Tour.)

Atlas 5A (56-6742) is on display on the lawn in front of the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa, Canada.
(5A was on display throughout the 1960s at the former location of the Air Force Museum, at Wright-Patterson AFB Building 89 near Xenia Drive in Fairborn, Ohio. Formerly a static-test article, it is the only surviving Atlas in the original A-series configuration, before the boat-tail modifications that solved thermal issues which caused the early termination of the first two Atlas test flights, 4A and 6A.)

Atlas 8A is displayed in front of the Strategic Air and Space Museum in Nebraska; reconfigured as an Atlas D.
Atlas 2E is on display in front of the San Diego Air & Space Museum at Gillespie Field, El Cajon, California.
Atlas 2D mounted with a Mercury capsule is on display in the Rocket Garden at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, Merritt Island, Florida

I remember back in the early 2000's seeing one on display in Huntsville, what happened to it?
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12781
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 3548
  • Likes Given: 610
Cut it into tiny pieces?  A real shame.  More than a shame, but I don't want to write the words.  The only A-series Atlas that survived in its original form.  This thing is a real piece of history, representing the configuration of the very first Atlas (4A) flown during the massive ICBM Cold War effort.   Missile 5A is the oldest surviving Atlas - a contemporary of the Navaho G26 that survives at the Cape.  Missile 5A was test fired 11 times on Test Stand 1-1 at Edwards Rocket Base in 1957, the second Atlas tested there and the fourth Atlas test fired anywhere.  I'm very surprised that it cannot be saved, that no one wants it saved.  (Well, I want it saved.)

BTW, this thread should be retitled to something like "Historic Atlas Missile to be Scrapped".

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/12/2015 07:37 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12781
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 3548
  • Likes Given: 610
More info here.

http://www.warbirdsnews.com/warbirds-news/17887.html

The story notes that this Atlas is serial number 56-6742, and that "it is possible that the Air Force Museum could assign the rocket to another museum if that entity paid for its move and restoration".

And here's a beautiful image of Atlas 5A by David Carroll of Canada Science and Technology Museum, which can be shared with attribution per the Creative Commons rules at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A shame this is currently bound for a shredder.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/13/2015 07:13 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12781
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 3548
  • Likes Given: 610
Scrapping to begin during "the next few weeks".

http://www.ottawasun.com/2015/02/10/museum-to-dismantle-rocket

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 02/14/2015 03:34 PM by edkyle99 »

Online John-H

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Liked: 31
  • Likes Given: 77
It was still there - in the snow - yesterday.

Offline Danderman

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9566
  • Liked: 345
  • Likes Given: 457
I'll be happy to take it, I have plenty of desert land where the thing could sit forever.

Offline Kansan52

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 867
  • Hutchinson, KS
  • Liked: 255
  • Likes Given: 306
Maybe a $1,000 for shipping. Another $2k to stabilized and ship?

Offline Danderman

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9566
  • Liked: 345
  • Likes Given: 457
If you guys can get it to my land, I would be happy to handle the zoning issues and hosting the hardware. My land virtually never sees rain, so it is like the boneyards in Mojave where aircraft are stored.

and, I have an empty structure (a car garage) that is 44 feet long and about 30 feet high, maybe it could house the hardware in a semi-erect position.


« Last Edit: 02/16/2015 06:57 PM by Danderman »

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31287
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 9570
  • Likes Given: 299
Maybe a $1,000 for shipping. Another $2k to stabilized and ship?

It needs a specialized trailer that was specifically designed for it.

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10949
  • Liked: 2433
  • Likes Given: 1
Presumably it also needs the leaks plugged before anything can be done with that. And you'd have to disconnect what is probably an electric compressor and attach another compressor that was transportable, maybe battery powered.

Sadly, it strikes me that moving this would require a fair amount of prep work and some specialized equipment, and probably some special permits for transport (maybe special paperwork to ship it across a national border) and none of that is going to happen in a few weeks or in winter. I think this one is a goner.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31287
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 9570
  • Likes Given: 299
Presumably it also needs the leaks plugged before anything can be done with that. And you'd have to disconnect what is probably an electric compressor and attach another compressor that was transportable, maybe battery powered.


The specialized trailer could hold the vehicle in stretch, eliminating the need for pressurization

Online John-H

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 124
  • Liked: 31
  • Likes Given: 77
Something like this?

This is a "Lost Ottawa" picture from it's arrival in 1973. It looks to be about the right size for a legal road trailer.

John


Offline Antilope7724

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 411
  • Watched Freedom 7 on live TV
  • California
  • Liked: 276
  • Likes Given: 249
Here's a link to a newspaper picture of the collapsed Atlas missile
at the U.S. Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio in 1986. (scroll up to view damage)

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1356&dat=19860620&id=s85PAAAAIBAJ&sjid=-gYEAAAAIBAJ&pg=4506,2122999

Story of AF museum Atlas missile collapse in 1986
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=QfJGAAAAIBAJ&sjid=dfMMAAAAIBAJ&pg=1450%2C2393998
« Last Edit: 02/17/2015 01:15 AM by Antilope7724 »

Offline Rocket Science

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7952
  • NASA Educator Astronaut Candidate Applicant 2002
  • Liked: 2157
  • Likes Given: 5101
I checked the Smithsonian and they show photos of the one that was on display at the USSRC on the trailer... One would think they would be the natural caretakers...

http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19750667000
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob, Physics instructor, aviator, vintage auto racer

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 31287
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 9570
  • Likes Given: 299
Something like this?

This is a "Lost Ottawa" picture from it's arrival in 1973. It looks to be about the right size for a legal road trailer.


It was made for cross country transport.

Tags: