Author Topic: Apollo 12  (Read 21755 times)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #40 on: 11/19/2014 02:41 AM »
Al puts the two pallets on each end of the ALSEP antenna, which doubles as a carry bar.  While the ALSEP pallets don't weigh that much in the low lunar gravity, they retain their mass and make the "barbell" flex and therefore hard to handle.

Then Al carries the ALSEP out to the deployment site, where Pete has run ahead to scout out the site.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Online Ronpur50

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #41 on: 11/19/2014 12:24 PM »
Thanks Doug! These are awesome!

Offline mjcrsmith

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #42 on: 11/19/2014 08:05 PM »
This
And now, the TV tragedy...

This in my opinion was a turning point.  The build up was Color TV from the moon. Anticipation and excitement was high as a follow up to 11.

No TV, interest drained.  People moved on.

By the time 14 landed, public interest was lost.



« Last Edit: 11/19/2014 08:05 PM by mjcrsmith »

Offline RanulfC

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #43 on: 11/19/2014 10:06 PM »
This
And now, the TV tragedy...

This in my opinion was a turning point.  The build up was Color TV from the moon. Anticipation and excitement was high as a follow up to 11.

No TV, interest drained.  People moved on.

By the time 14 landed, public interest was lost.

Actually there was already a large "loss" simply from Apollo having "achieved its goals" with Apollo-11. ANYTHING after that was fighting an uphill battle with more pressing concerns for the average person.

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #44 on: 11/21/2014 12:37 AM »
Okay, moving on, here are a few more shots of Pete and Al setting up the ALSEP.  I can't easily tell Pete from Al in these pics, since the idea of adding red stripes to the CDR's suit didn't get implemented until Apollo 13.  Although, looking at the sequence of images, unless Pete and Al changed out cameras or film mags, it appears these three pics were taken by Pete, since just prior to these images the pics on this mag are of Al carrying the ALSEP out to the site.

Also, in this post and the next, note the blue "halo" effect.  This isn't actually a halo from bright sun on the suits -- it's light diffracting through a dust smudge on the camera lens.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #45 on: 11/21/2014 12:40 AM »
And here are another few pics that seem to be of Al, taken by Pete, during ALSEP deploy, as well as a pic of just the ALSEP post-deployment.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
« Last Edit: 11/21/2014 12:41 AM by the_other_Doug »
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #46 on: 11/21/2014 12:44 AM »
And finally, for the ALSEP deployment, a couple of pics taken by Al of Pete as he went about his ALSEP deployment tasks, plus a nice close-up of the deployed lunar surface seismometer (LSS).

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #47 on: 11/21/2014 12:52 AM »
And to wrap up the farthest extent of EVA 1, here are a couple of pictures of the mounds located near the ALSEP site, and a nice picture taken from the rim of Middle Crescent crater, a large, shallow old crater just to the west of the ALSEP site, beyond and to the north of Head crater.  Since Pete and Al came up to the crater from the east, their shadows fall down the shallow crater wall and nearly to the center of the crater, more than 300 meters away!

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #48 on: 11/21/2014 01:04 AM »
And, finally for EVA 1, a couple of nice color images of the LM area, taken mostly during EVA 1 closeout, although the third image was taken of the ground directly beneath the engine bell fairly early in the EVA.  Also, note from some of the images that, just to take some of the pans, the crew descended 20 to 30 feet into Surveyor crater during EVA 1.  It was unavoidable if they wanted to get the planned pictures.

Coming soon -- the exciting second EVA and the Surveyor!

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #49 on: 11/23/2014 12:20 AM »
Now on to EVA 2.  (This will be a little less involved than for EVA 1, partially because they only took B&W film mags out for EVA 2, and partially because I'm heading out on the road to visit my elderly mother for Thanksgiving n a few hours, so I don't have tons of time to pull the lunar surface images together for y'all, here.)

First, we have a few "tourist shot" portraits.  The first is the finest image of a moonwalking astronaut I think ever came out of Apollo, even if it is in B&W.  It's of Al Bean holding the Special Environment Sample Container (SESC), basically s can that could be sealed to provide a surefire vacuum environment for a sample.  I believe this was for trying to identify volatiles in a a given sample, and gives a backup to the vacuum seals on the rock boxes.  This image is extremely detailed, gives a great view of the suit and connections, and also a really nice portrait-within-a-portrait of Pete, taking the picture, reflected in Al's visor.

The second image, taken around the same time, of Pete taking the preceding picture.  It's not exactly the same moment, since the image of Al dowsn't show him activating the camera trigger, but it's within a few seconds.  Not quite as sharp, but a good reciprocal of the first pic.

Finally, the actual picture of Al as he takes the picture of Pete taking a picture of Al.  Again, this one was taken three frames after the first image of this sequence, so it's not th ebest image of the set, but it's kewl for the self-referential thing going on here.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #50 on: 11/23/2014 01:40 AM »
As EVA 2 proceeded, Pete's motivator was to "get 'round the circle."  The real-time traverse plan, based on several pre-flight traverse plans roughed in based on a few different possible landing points, ended up being a misshapen circle around the Surveyor crater.  While never wandering terrible far from Intrepid, she nevertheless looked a bit distant from some of their vantage points.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #51 on: 11/23/2014 01:45 AM »
As Pete and Al approached Surveyor crater intending to descend into it and to the Surveyor, Al set down the HTC and tried to find the Hasselblad camera timer he had tossed earlier into the big sample carrying bag.  He couldn't find it, even after tipping all the sample bags out of it and having Pete help him look.  So, after hassling with failing cameras, they approached Surveyor.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #52 on: 11/23/2014 01:49 AM »
When they reached Surveyor but before approaching close in to it, Al (who by then had the only remaining working camera, the dust taking its toll on the other) took a lot of pictures of the Surveyor, its footpads, and its scoop.  It's interesting to see the interaction between the footpads and the surface as Surveyor bounced to a stop -- the crater had fooled its radar into thinking it was still above the surface when it touched down, so the landing jets kept firing for several seconds as Surveyor bounced and hopped down the side of the crater.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #53 on: 11/23/2014 01:53 AM »
Finally, Pete moves in and pushes on Surveyor to make sure it's not likely to slide down the slope on them.  After satisfying themselves that Surveyor was not going anywhere, the took a close look at its TV camera and cut off several pieces.  Once piece they were supposed to cut off, the corner of the top of one of the instrument compartments, resisted the cutter and would not snip off.  You can see the edge they tried to cut off, bent up but otherwise undamaged, in the last image.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #54 on: 11/23/2014 02:06 AM »
And, to wrap up the lunar surface images, here are a few patriotic shots taken during EVA 1 that still make my heart beat just a little faster.

I'll wrap up with return to Earth images when I get back from my road trip.  Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving, everyone!  For me, I will always give thanks for having lived through the Apollo era and seen the sights that I saw.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Online pargoo

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #55 on: 11/23/2014 10:12 AM »
     Ah, so they set out with two b&w magazines on the cameras for EVA 2...
     Why two b&w's instead of one color or *two* color mags?  Were they out of color film?  Were they told to take only b&w?  If a camera with a color magazine jammed would/could they have swapped the magazines out on the surface considering the intensity of the sunlight?  I have always been amazed that on a mission designed to return maximum data per buck that pics of the only spacecraft humans have rendezvoused with on another heavenly body were only taken in b&w.

Offline Bob Shaw

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #56 on: 11/23/2014 10:46 AM »
It's interesting to see the interaction between the footpads and the surface as Surveyor bounced to a stop -- the crater had fooled its radar into thinking it was still above the surface when it touched down, so the landing jets kept firing for several seconds as Surveyor bounced and hopped down the side of the crater.

-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

The photograph of the Surveyor 3 footpad is a classic, but doesn't quite tell the whole story. Yes, the vehicle bounced a bit on final touchdown, but the *real* bouncing happened further upslope as it skittered down into the crater. So far as I know, no signs of the earlier bounces were to be seen in any of the mission photography. The final jitter as it landed was just a baby bounce!

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #57 on: 11/23/2014 11:17 AM »
How can anyone - anyone - look at these pictures, read about this amazing mission and say 'Manned Missions to the Moon aren't worth it' or 'achieve little' or 'been there; done that' etc. Such B.S. and poppycock!! Long Live Apollos 11 thru 17...  :')
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Offline eric z

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #58 on: 11/23/2014 11:28 AM »
Picture 7133 was always a big favorite! This has been a fantastic look back at a great mission, thank you!
   The Surveyor program itself, and Lunar Orbiter, were mind-boggling and along with Gemini should never be forgotten for their roles in our march to the Moon.

Offline rocketguy101

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Re: Apollo 12
« Reply #59 on: 11/23/2014 08:31 PM »
If I may post it here, a picture of the scoop that is housed at the Cosmosphere in Kansas...give me a chill looking at it, knowing it was retrieved from surface of the moon...
David

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