Author Topic: 3-D Printing in Space  (Read 46470 times)

Online deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #60 on: 09/25/2017 09:34 PM »
Whole series of papers from AIAA Space 2017 on this topic:

NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing Project: Toward a Multimaterial Fabrication Laboratory for the International Space Station
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5277

Applications for the Archinaut In Space Manufacturing and Assembly Capability
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5365

Made In Space Archinaut: Key Enabler for Asteroid Belt Colonization
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5364

Archinaut: In-Space Manufacturing and Assembly for Next-Generation Space Habitats
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5227

‘Made for Space and Played in Space’: GravityGames, Microgravity 3D Printer, and Crew on the International Space Station Create a Critical New Space Engagement for STEM Students
https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/pdfplus/10.2514/6.2017-5245
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #61 on: 09/26/2017 12:05 AM »
Excellent post.
I knew of few things that Archinaut could enable like large antennas, truss for satellite to attach payloads to.

One of more surprising was huge solar sails capable if delivering 66t to Mars in 700days. I've only thought of deployable solar sails for cubesat mission. This would be one easier things for Archinaut build.

Online deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #62 on: 10/19/2017 05:59 PM »
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/two-for-the-crew-3-d-design-challenge-seeks-students-to-invent-multi-use-tools

Quote
Sept. 21, 2017

Two for the Crew 3-D Design Challenge Seeks Students to Invent Multi-Use Tools

This fall, NASA and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Foundation are challenging students to use their ingenuity to create a helpful tool that combines the functions of two objects being used by crew aboard the International Space Station.  The national Future Engineers Two for the Crew Challenge provides an exciting opportunity for K-12 students to develop an innovative model intended to be 3-D printed by astronauts on the orbiting laboratory. Students will invent multi-use tools and customized equipment that can help astronauts with maintenance, medical, trash management, and the challenge of securing and storing items in microgravity.

Human exploration of the solar system is currently limited by the need to carry consumables, replace systems and parts, and use available materials. This is why building and maintaining things in space will be important for future missions. Students will learn about the advantages of in-space manufacturing and customization. This means that crew members can print items when they are needed, including specific parts for the unique space station environment.

Participants will explore concepts like mass and volume, while learning engineering and 3-D design skills. Submissions from K-12 students in the United States will be accepted online through Dec. 19 at www.futureengineers.org/twoforthecrew.

Winners will be announced on March 14, 2018.

The Two for the Crew Challenge is free for student participation. The challenge website provides educational information about space station crew tools and brainstorming resources that help students get started with creating their designs. The site also provides links to free 3-D design software.

Two for the Crew is the sixth in a series of space innovation challenges developed by Future Engineers and the ASME Foundation, with technical assistance from NASA.
« Last Edit: 10/19/2017 05:59 PM by deruch »
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Online deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #63 on: 10/20/2017 06:31 AM »
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/centers/marshall/images/refabricator.html

Quote
Aug. 28, 2017

Full Circle: NASA to Demonstrate Refabricator to Recycle, Reuse, Repeat

In 2014, NASA made important progress toward the in-space manufacturing necessary for deep space exploration by “printing” tools in space using a 3-D printer on the International Space Station.

In 2018, the nation's space agency will take the next step toward a sustainable in-space manufacturing capability when it launches a machine that can not only print plastic parts, but can also recycle them back into reusable raw materials to make more and/or different parts.

The machine, coined the “Refabricator,” is a device that will accept plastic materials of various sizes and shapes and turn them in to the feedstock used to 3-D print items. The whole process happens in a single automated machine about the size of a dorm room refrigerator.

"When we begin launching humans to destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, space will be at a premium," said Niki Werkheiser, manager of In-Space Manufacturing at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where the device will be thoroughly tested before launching to the space station. "It simply won’t be feasible to send along replacement parts or tools for everything on the spacecraft, and resupplying from Earth is cost and time prohibitive. The Refabricator will be key in demonstrating a sustainable logistics model to fabricate, recycle, and reuse parts and waste materials.” 

NASA awarded a Small Business Innovation Research contract valued at approximately $750,000 to Tethers Unlimited Inc. of Seattle in April 2015, to build the recycling system.

“The Refabricator demonstration is a key advance toward our vision of implementing a truly sustainable, in-space manufacturing ecosystem,” said Rob Hoyt, CEO of TUI. “Astronauts could use this technology to manufacture and recycle food-safe utensils, and turn what is now inconvenient waste into feedstock to help build the next generation of space systems. We believe re-using the waste could reduce the cost and risks for NASA and private space exploration missions.”

The Refabricator will complete final flight certification testing at the Marshall Center in late 2017 and is slated to launch to station in April 2018. Almost all operations will be remotely commanded and controlled from Marshall’s Payload Operations Integration Center – mission control for science on the space station -- and TUI. The ability to remotely manage the process can save astronaut time and provide greater autonomy for future spaceflight missions.

"The space station is the ideal proving ground for this important technology," said Werkheiser. "Astronauts are already living and working in space, a mere 250 miles above Earth. Those crew members are helping make discoveries to benefit humans around the world while testing the important technology, life support systems and medical breakthroughs that will enable long-duration space exploration by humans."

The Refabricator will be the first integrated recycler-manufacturer in orbit and may eventually be able to recycle and print, using metal as well as plastic, with very little monitoring from the station crew members. By 2020, NASA wants to create a Fabrication Laboratory, or FabLab, to test an integrated, multi-material, on-demand system.

"The FabLab would allow astronauts to select what they want or need from a catalogue of parts and then simply push a button to have it made," said Werkheiser.

This project is an ideal example of how government and small businesses can effectively work together. In this example, NASA and TUI worked hand-in-hand in the rapid development of a brand new technology for in-space applications. NASA provided guidance and insight on how to design the system to successfully meet the stringent space flight certification, safety, and operations constraints.

NASA continues to leverage open competition, including crowd-sourcing, Small Business Innovation Research awards, Broad Agency Announcements, and challenge competitions, to collaborate and meet space needs for space exploration.

For more information about the Small Business Innovation Research program, visit:  https://sbir.nasa.gov
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #64 on: 10/23/2017 07:00 PM »
The re-fabricator tech is a piece of the puzzle to make going to Mars and elsewhere easier and cheaper by reducing the required mass needed and also being able to expand the ability to replace broken parts far beyond the normal idea of supplies required to support a moderately risky endeavor and make it a lower risk endeavor.

Offline allhumanbeings07

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #65 on: 10/27/2017 12:37 PM »
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-invites-media-to-upcoming-space-station-cargo-launch

Looks like the ZBLAN printer is going up on CRS-13 in December
I love Star Trek more than anyone, but we don't (and shouldn't) spend tens of billions of dollars on space programs for fun

Online deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #66 on: 11/01/2017 01:56 AM »
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Online deruch

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #67 on: 04/13/2018 07:49 PM »
Quote
ISS Daily Summary Report – 4/06/2018

Made in Space Fiber Optics (MSFO):  The crew set up the MSFO locker and cables in preparation for 3D print operations in the Manufacturing Device. This investigation demonstrates the merits of manufacturing fiber optic filaments in microgravity.

Today’s Planned Activities
Made In Space Fiber Optics Locker and Cable Setup

Looks like the first ZBLAN fiber run is going to be happening in short order.  Possibly timed to allow return of the printed cable on SpX-14.
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online TrevorMonty

Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #68 on: 05/18/2018 10:25 PM »
There are some good videos and more inf on this technology on MIS website.

www.parabolicarc.com/2018/05/17/space-bid-phase-ii-archinaut-development-program/

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif., May 17, 2018 (Made in Space PR) — NASA has invited Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) to submit a proposal for a technology flight demonstration mission (Phase II) of its Archinaut technology. Archinaut is an in-space robotic manufacturing and assembly platform capable of constructing space-optimized systems of sizes not previously feasible. NASA’s Space Technology and Mission Directorate (STMD) awarded MIS its initial Archinaut contract in 2016. Since that time, MIS has made significant advancements in space-capable extended structure additive manufacturing and robotic assembly.

Offline Asteroza

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Re: 3-D Printing in Space
« Reply #69 on: 05/22/2018 05:08 AM »
Will MiS' Archinaut beat TU's SpiderFab to the additive manufacturing punch?

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