Author Topic: Modelling Mars  (Read 122780 times)

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #360 on: 04/18/2015 03:07 PM »
OK, I have added the decals.  Each module has it's name on it, Hab 1, Hab 2, Lab and Storage.  The United Nations was supposed to organize this mission so it's flag is large on the front of the ship with "Mars One" on the opposite side.  Under Mars One are the flags of the main participating nations and their agencies.  A group of those flags also are placed on each hab module. 

I will try to take some beauty shots soon to put her in orbit of Mars.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #361 on: 04/18/2015 03:47 PM »
BTW, it would have been 28 days, exactly 4 weeks since Ares launched 30 years ago.  So here is Ares, 4 weeks out and still 143 days from Venus flyby and 341 days from Mars orbit!!

« Last Edit: 01/29/2016 01:50 AM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #362 on: 04/19/2015 03:37 AM »
February 20, 1997: Mars One on approach to Mars Orbit Insertion burn.

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #363 on: 04/19/2015 08:45 AM »
I like the Aviation Week Cover.

Mars I looks good, too...

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #364 on: 04/21/2015 12:28 AM »
Here is a few more pictures of Mike's Discovery and it's staging. 

The first photo is the dropping of the 2nd stage and ignition of the 3rd and final booster stage.  The 3rd stage boosts the habitat out of Earth orbit and on it's flyby trajectory around Mars and back.

And the last picture is of the habitat leaving Earth and the spent 3rd stage behind.  The habitat has it's own small engine for course correction. 

Now, I need some photos of the habitat with it's solar panels so I can fly it around Mars!

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #365 on: 04/21/2015 07:41 PM »
Here is another one of Mars One during it's orbital insertion burn.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #366 on: 04/21/2015 11:12 PM »
Here is a side by side comparison of both Ares and Mars One.

Offline RanulfC

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #367 on: 04/22/2015 09:36 PM »
And that makes me thing of bubbles saying:
 "Mars One: Took your time didn't you?"
"Ares: Do NOT turn left at Phobos, we're just sayin..."

Randy
From The Amazing Catstronaut on the Black Arrow LV:
British physics, old chap. It's undignified to belch flames and effluvia all over the pad, what. A true gentlemen's orbital conveyance lifts itself into the air unostentatiously, with the minimum of spectacle and a modicum of grace. Not like our American cousins' launch vehicles, eh?

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #368 on: 05/05/2015 02:49 PM »
I modified two more patches for Moonlab flights.  So, now I have 1, 2, 3 and 5. With Enterprise as the CSM for Moonlab 1, I will assume Kitty Hawk would be Moonlab 2, and Casper for Moonlab 3.

I realized that Atlantis was never used for a vehicle in Voyage, so maybe Moonlab 4 and the Grissom for Moonlab 5/Soyuz.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #369 on: 05/10/2015 01:50 AM »
On the 50th day since launch, the Ares crew conducted an Interview with CNN.  With question submitted by children, Tom Mintier asked the astronauts the questions, and then waited for the answers.  The next interviews would be taped and the time delay edited out.

This was a fun photo to do.  I googled images of astronauts in the shuttle and ISS to find some in the correct pose.  I then added the actors faces from the audio to those photos using Gimp.  With Astronaut Scott still standing in for Gershon, I had to add the bottom of an EVA suit to his photo, since I could not find a full body shot.  I then put them into a photo of Skylab.  I had to manipulate a CNN logo to the correct color, and create the “Live” and “from ARES Mission Module” in MS Paint.  Once it was all put together, I filtered it in Gimp to look like a VHS screen capture from 1985!

The whole thing took about 3 hours to do.
« Last Edit: 05/10/2015 07:13 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #370 on: 05/25/2015 10:29 PM »
Mission Elapsed Time [Day/Hr:Min:Sec] Plus 066/06:34:51(May 25, 1985)
Phil Stone hadn’t slept well. It was almost a relief when his intercom started piping out some kind of music, gentle elevator stuff with guitars.
The music cut off.
Fred Haise, working as capcom, came on the line. “When you’re ready, Ares, I’ve got a couple of flight plan updates and an update on your consumables, and the morning news, I guess.”
“Surely. What have we got… The Lakers have beaten the Boston Celtics four to two for the NBA title. Natalie might be glad to hear that. Or she might not. The TWA hijack continues. It looks as if the passengers have been moved out and dispersed around the Beirut slums… Here’s something for you, Ralph; I know you’re a sci-fi buff. Gene Roddenberry has said he’s scrapping the treatment he’d prepared for a new Star Trek series. It was going to be like the first, with the huge space cruiser Enterprise with massive phaser banks, bigger and more powerful than anything they’re likely to encounter. But he’s changed his mind; he’s been inspired by you guys, apparently. Now, Roddenberry says he’s aiming for something called Star Trek Explorer, about a small, pioneering band of humans and aliens in their fragile craft, going much farther than anyone has gone before… How about that, guys. Science fact changing the face of science fiction. It says here.”

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #371 on: 05/30/2015 01:48 PM »
OK, granted it is still a long way off for this to happen real time, but I am really happy with this photo!

Challenger approaching landing.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2016 09:29 PM by Ronpur50 »

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #372 on: 05/30/2015 02:55 PM »
Most excellent

Offline Archibald

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #373 on: 05/30/2015 04:56 PM »
Superb picture !

I loved the alternate Star Trek, too.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #374 on: 06/01/2015 12:10 AM »
Thanks!  I am trying to do more surface shots for next year.  "Next year", wow. it still is hard to fathom that it would have been such a long mission!  It makes me realize just how hard the flight to Mars would be. 

Offline Archibald

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #375 on: 06/02/2015 03:35 PM »
Ronpur - if you ever need a soundtrack to Baxter Voyage then there's an album that fit the bill wonderfully. It is Dire Straits "On the Night" (recorded during their huge On every street tour that lasted all over the years 1991-92). Admittedly the album didn't existed in 1986, although most tracks had probably been released by the mid-80's.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Night
1.    "Calling Elvis"                                   10:25
2.    "Walk of Life"                               5:06
3.    "Heavy Fuel"                                       5:23
4.    "Romeo and Juliet"                      10:05
5.    "Private Investigations"               9:43
6.    "Your Latest Trick"                       5:35
7.    "On Every Street"                               7:01
8.    "You and Your Friend"                       6:48
9.    "Money for Nothing"                          6:28
10.    "Brothers in Arms"                             8:54

I would suggest "Brother in arms" for the novel finale, when Natalie set her foot on Mars.

"Romeo and Juliet" > Apollo-N scary reentry with Ben Priest feelings.

"Calling Elvis" > the Venus flyby, September 8, 1985

"Your latest trick" > any part that describe Earth as seen from orbit.

Still thinking about the others...
« Last Edit: 06/02/2015 03:48 PM by Archibald »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #376 on: 06/11/2015 07:34 PM »
While I wait for the next scheduled update from Voyage, I painted up an old space shuttle and turned it into a US Air Force space shuttle.  Here it is seen on SLC-6 at Vandenberg AFB. 
« Last Edit: 06/11/2015 07:47 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #377 on: 07/19/2015 11:14 PM »
 From Voyage by Stephen Baxter:
"Mission Elapsed Time [Day/Hr:Min:Sec] Plus 121/12:23:34 (July 20, 1985)
Gershon floated out of the docking adapter and into the Command Module’s forward access tunnel. He emerged headfirst at the top of Apollo’s conical cabin. He did a neat somersault in the air, translating from the “up” of the Mission Module to the “down” of the Apollo.
He adjusted his headset and made sure he had a working comms link to the rest of the Ares cluster — both York and Stone responded from intercoms in the Mission Module — and he fired off a call to Fred Haise, who was the capcom on the ground. He didn’t wait for his signal to crawl across the Solar System to bring him a reply before beginning work, however.
He began to power up Apollo’s systems.
During the transfer to Mars and back, all but essential systems were quiescent on Apollo. There were umbilical connections through the docking system which hooked up Apollo to the main solar panel arrays, so Apollo didn’t have to run on its own power. Every fifty days or so, Gershon was supposed to go through this routine of checking Apollo’s systems. He was making sure they would be working when it came time for the crew to ride Apollo home, back down through the air of Earth.
The chore took maybe 40 percent of his attention.
He dug a cassette tape out of his pocket and slid it into the deck forward of Stone’s flight station. The sound of violins — a light, delicate phrase — came drifting out into the cabin’s thin air. Gershon closed his eyes, and let the music wash over him. Mozart: Symphony Number 40. Exquisite. He felt himself relax, and even the cabin around him started to feel bigger.
Nam vets were supposed to live up to the image of spaced-out Jimi Hendrix fans. And in Houston, image was an important thing: when you had ten guys, with equally good qualifications, competing for one seat, intangibles like image could win you a flight, or lose you one.
So Gershon kept his Mozart to himself.

He was alone in the cabin as he worked through his checklist. Closing the hatch was strictly against regs, and he had to clear it with Stone every time he went in there. But Apollo was one of the few places in the whole cluster where you could get a little genuine privacy. Stone understood. You had to have a little space, a little time to yourself.
It was strange to think that there were only three human beings within tens of millions of miles of this point, and yet here they were cooped up together, for months on end, in this collection of tin cans. The only solid interior partitions in the Mission Module were those around the crapper.

He worked steadily through the gauges and dials and computer screens in front of him, and compared them with the expected readings printed out on his teletyped checklist. His headset was voice-activated; he’d fixed it so that the Mozart stopped playing when he spoke."
« Last Edit: 07/19/2015 11:24 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #378 on: 07/19/2015 11:17 PM »
"Gershon liked working with Apollo hardware.
The basic design was antiquated, but it was fifteen years since its last major failure, on Apollo 13. Anyway, there wasn’t necessarily anything wrong with “antiquated.” To a pilot, it was the difference between a development vehicle and an operational bird; for “antiquated” read “proven.” In Gershon’s view it would have been a crying shame to have abandoned the Apollo line back in the early 1970s and try to build a newfangled spaceplane. Nice as the shuttle would have been to fly.
The enhancements Rockwell had applied over the years had turned the basic configuration into a flexible, robust space truck. Outwardly the ship stuck nose first to the front of the Mission Module Docking Adapter looked much the same as every other Apollo which had ever flown: it was made up of the classic configuration, the cylindrical Service Module, with its big propulsion system engine bell stuck on the back, and the squat cone of the Command Module on top. But this Apollo — called a “Block V” design by the Rockwell engineers who had built her — was put together very differently from the early models, the old Block IIs, which had flown to the Moon in the 1960s, and even from the later Block III and IV Earth-orbital ferries.

The Service Module had more reaction control gas and less main engine propellant. The old Service Modules had vented excess water, produced by the onboard batteries; the Ares model stored its water in tanks, to avoid having frozen ice particles drifting around near the cluster. The whole configuration had more batteries, and there was more stowage area and locker space in the Command Module. There was an atmosphere interchange duct in the upper docking assembly, to cycle air from the Mission Module into the Command Module. And so on.

Reliability was essential on long-duration missions. Many of Apollo’s systems had redundant backups — straightforward copies, to be substituted in case of a failure — but the old triple-redundancy design paradigm they’d used to get to the Moon wouldn’t work, it had been found, on long-duration missions. Enough redundancy to achieve an acceptably low level of risk over such a span of time would have resulted in a spacecraft of immense weight and complexity.
So the designers had gotten smarter. In addition to simple redundancy, some functions could be performed by dissimilar components, or by components from different subsystems, to reduce the chance of a single failure mode knocking out many functions altogether — as had happened in Apollo 13. And the maintenance capabilities of the crew weren’t ignored, either. The whole ship was more modular and accessible than in its first design, so that components could be reached, and repaired or replaced comparatively easily. There were also isolation valves,switches, test equipment, and fault diagnosis tools. Some of the components contained their own BITEs, microelectronic built-in self-test units."
« Last Edit: 07/19/2015 11:25 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #379 on: 07/19/2015 11:21 PM »
While Gershon listens to Mozart as he works in the CSM, York works in the science module and Stone works in the habitat.  Ares has now been en route to Mars for 121 days still 248 days to go to MOI, with the next major event to be the Venus flyby in September. 


I am sure Baxter picked this date for this mission update because it is the anniversary of Apollo 11.  The photos I modified placed "Gershon" in the command module and "York" in the Skylab.  I found a photo from Skylab of what I think maybe Conrad, and used that for Stone.  And of course, another photo of my Ares model, showing the inhabited part of the spacecraft.  The Venus flyby is scheduled for September 8.  But, I have a few more things in work before then.
« Last Edit: 07/19/2015 11:35 PM by Ronpur50 »

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