Author Topic: Modelling Mars  (Read 122347 times)

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #120 on: 12/19/2014 11:26 AM »
ET sep.  I tried some blurriness on this, like it was from a long range camera on Skylab or something.
« Last Edit: 12/19/2014 11:27 AM by Ronpur50 »

Offline RichO

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #121 on: 12/19/2014 04:45 PM »
Nice photos Ron!!
OMG, I finally discovered what's wrong with my brain: On the left side there's nothing right, and on the right side there's nothing left!

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #122 on: 12/22/2014 12:11 AM »
I did a little more work on Mars One.  I added the outboard tunnels to the modules.  I took a comparison photo of the plans in the book.  I have to add a bunch of Venus Probes, two comsats, two Mars Flyers and storage tanks.  That is before I add the solar arrays. 

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #123 on: 12/24/2014 12:28 AM »
Ron, are you going to do the whole vehicle?  I just found my Mars One manual and building the whole spacecraft would be quite a challenge as well as a cool display.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #124 on: 12/24/2014 04:10 AM »
I plan on just doing the second stage tanks, not the Earth Departure Stage.  Maybe if I had build it at a smaller scale, lol.
 But this way, I can display it with the shuttle models I have.  I am not going to buy another Shapeways MEM for this one.

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #125 on: 12/24/2014 05:41 PM »
That should still be impressive.  Looking forward to seeing it.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #126 on: 12/25/2014 12:35 PM »
I hope it turns out impressive, lol.  I wish I still had the parts I had from the first version I made in 1985!

Merry Christmas!
« Last Edit: 12/25/2014 12:37 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #127 on: 01/26/2015 11:59 PM »
I bought two of Mike's nosecones from Shapeways.  I tested one out on top of the S-II stage of my Saturn VB.  It fits and looks great!  Well done Mike!

I am assuming this to be the launch configuration of an unmanned MEM test!

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #128 on: 01/27/2015 01:01 AM »
Thanks Ron!  I appreciate it.  Looks good.

Offline tea monster

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #129 on: 01/28/2015 01:05 AM »
I've got to get Baxter's book after reading this thread. I love that you are bringing this to life.

Oh, on a side note, what ever happened to the 'Nova' booster? I remember reading some of my Dad's National Geographics from the era and word at the time seemed to be that the Nova was the next big thing after Saturn. Now a Googly search turns up nothing  ???

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #130 on: 01/28/2015 01:12 AM »
I've got to get Baxter's book after reading this thread. I love that you are bringing this to life.

Oh, on a side note, what ever happened to the 'Nova' booster? I remember reading some of my Dad's National Geographics from the era and word at the time seemed to be that the Nova was the next big thing after Saturn. Now a Googly search turns up nothing  ???

I remember those issues too! :)

Nova was replaced by Saturn developments with similar payload.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nova_(rocket)
« Last Edit: 01/28/2015 06:19 AM by Dalhousie »
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #131 on: 01/28/2015 01:23 AM »
I've got to get Baxter's book after reading this thread. I love that you are bringing this to life.


Thanks, glad you are enjoying it.  I don't know if anyone realizes it, but in March it will be the 30th Anniversary of the flight if it was a real timeline.  Maybe we need an update thread on the mission! 

And I need to get back to my other Mars vehicle too.  But a B-52, Jonny Quest Dragonfly and a Vostok among other things put it on the back burner.
« Last Edit: 01/28/2015 01:24 AM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #132 on: 02/10/2015 03:41 PM »
In August 1984, time was running out for the MEM development.  MEM 009, the Iowa was the first manned test of the spacecraft.  With a crew of Adam Bleeker and Ralph Gershon in the MEM and Bob Crippen in the CSM,New Jersey, the MEM was put through a series of maneuvers.  If you have read the book, it didn't go exactly to plan. 

Absolutely nothing is written in the book about the configuration of the Saturn VB launch vehicle.  So I improvised.  Putting the MEM under the same interstage shroud that is used on the Ares launch, I placed the Apollo CSM atop of this.  When in orbit, it would dock with the MEM and the two crew members would climb through the connecting tunnel.  The they would drift away as Bob Crippen gave them room to test the MEM.  The model is my previous Saturn VB with a new payload.  I Gimped the model onto a MLP rolling out of the VAB.  Then I placed the CSM/MEM in orbit.  I added an undocked view as well.



Edit: Replaced VAB picture.
« Last Edit: 03/02/2015 09:10 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #133 on: 02/11/2015 04:34 AM »
In my continuing obsession with this book and documenting these flights that never happened, I created a series of graphics of the 9 Saturn VB flights used to assemble the Ares vehicles in earth orbit.  I have come up with 4 flights for the spacecraft assembly and 5 for the fueling.  Then the final flight for the Mission Module and crew.  I wonder also if there would have been Saturn IB flights with crews to assemble the spacecraft during the first four flights?  I have no intention of building all of these models! 

I wonder how many of these flights would have been completed by this time 30 years ago in this alternate timeline?
« Last Edit: 02/11/2015 03:50 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #134 on: 02/11/2015 07:05 AM »
So what guided your colour choice for the pristine heat shield of the MEM?
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #135 on: 02/11/2015 11:49 AM »
The can of grey paint I had left that wasn't empty and looked cool in contrast to the white.  That was it!

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #136 on: 02/11/2015 03:10 PM »
I like your chart.  I'm gonna print it out and put it in a cheap frame.  :)

yes, I think there would have been Saturn IB launches to support the construction.  At least for launches 2 - 4.

Or, Apollo's from Skylab would have been brought over.

My mental picture, in contrast to yours, was launches 6 - 10 would have looked like 4 and 5 with an S-II tank, but I admit I never calculated the volume requirements for fuel and oxidizer.

I also think the MS-IV and MS-II launches, particularly if they were empty, would be conducted by stock Saturn V's.  And maybe the tanker flights as well.  The Skylab launch did not, I believe, come close to the payload capacity of the two stage Saturn V launch.  I'd have to calculate them up.

Since they had three pads, they could keep up a pretty fast cadence.  The MS-IVB and MS-II and the first ET could have all been on the pad and launched within days of each other.  Rolling out the 2nd ET could have been done right quickly with the addition of a 4th Mobile Launcher so within 30-60 days, the basic vehicle would have been assembled.

Online mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #137 on: 02/11/2015 03:11 PM »
Upon more consideration, the MEM test could have been a dual launch.  A Saturn V putting up the MEM and a IB putting up Apollo.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #138 on: 02/11/2015 03:19 PM »
Upon more consideration, the MEM test could have been a dual launch.  A Saturn V putting up the MEM and a IB putting up Apollo.

I actually thought about this.  I think it would have worked.  I don't think it may have needed a VB for that, just a regular Sat V.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #139 on: 02/11/2015 03:29 PM »
I like your chart.  I'm gonna print it out and put it in a cheap frame.  :)

I plan to do the same.  It will look good behind my models.  And be advised, I just updated it, I forgot to list the MEM payload!

yes, I think there would have been Saturn IB launches to support the construction.  At least for launches 2 - 4.

Or, Apollo's from Skylab would have been brought over.

I was thinking 3, for assembly of the MS-IVB to MS-II, ET  I then ET II.  Tankers would be automated docking.

My mental picture, in contrast to yours, was launches 6 - 10 would have looked like 4 and 5 with an S-II tank, but I admit I never calculated the volume requirements for fuel and oxidizer.

You mean with a larger tanker?  Possibly, but I have an extra Airfix Skylab to be made into a tanker, so they look like this now!

I also think the MS-IV and MS-II launches, particularly if they were empty, would be conducted by stock Saturn V's.  And maybe the tanker flights as well.  The Skylab launch did not, I believe, come close to the payload capacity of the two stage Saturn V launch.  I'd have to calculate them up.

He wrote they were 9 Saturn VB assembly flights, so that is what I did.  I think the test flights could have been Saturn V.

Since they had three pads, they could keep up a pretty fast cadence.  The MS-IVB and MS-II and the first ET could have all been on the pad and launched within days of each other.  Rolling out the 2nd ET could have been done right quickly with the addition of a 4th Mobile Launcher so within 30-60 days, the basic vehicle would have been assembled.

Sound about right.  I want to figure it out too, and go backwards for approximate launch dates. 
« Last Edit: 02/11/2015 03:51 PM by Ronpur50 »

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