Author Topic: Modelling Mars  (Read 122770 times)

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #100 on: 11/22/2014 10:30 AM »
That is just Evergreen sheet styrene that is metal siding.  It looks just like the stringers on the Saturn V models.  I will just leave the nose cones off. 

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #101 on: 11/23/2014 01:22 AM »
I got to thinking about the actual 30 days on Mars, and that the crew is going to need some type of rover.  Otherwise, they are just going to spend 30 days walking around the same tiny area of the surface.  I made a tiny LRV-type rover using some shuttle wheels and bits of plastic.  Here it is in rough form.  I made a little canopy for it as well, not pressurized but enough to keep the wind-blown dust off of your visor!

I have also started a little radio controlled rover to help patrol the surface.  I would imagine with the height of the MEM, you could send it out and keep a visual on it for quite a while.  Or maybe it can follow the crewed rover for support on a sortie.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2014 01:28 AM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #102 on: 11/23/2014 01:25 AM »
I have also finished the main painting of the ET for the departure stage as well.

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #103 on: 11/23/2014 06:42 AM »
I got to thinking about the actual 30 days on Mars, and that the crew is going to need some type of rover.  Otherwise, they are just going to spend 30 days walking around the same tiny area of the surface.  I made a tiny LRV-type rover using some shuttle wheels and bits of plastic.  Here it is in rough form.  I made a little canopy for it as well, not pressurized but enough to keep the wind-blown dust off of your visor!

I have also started a little radio controlled rover to help patrol the surface.  I would imagine with the height of the MEM, you could send it out and keep a visual on it for quite a while.  Or maybe it can follow the crewed rover for support on a sortie.

For the 1971 study, which was the last to use the NA MEM, they proposed two LRV-type landers.  This mean they could range out much further than the walk back distance. Voyage does not mention a rover but there would have been at least one.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #104 on: 11/23/2014 11:39 AM »
I found this illustration. It is from the early 90s.

Offline roma847

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #105 on: 11/23/2014 11:55 AM »
Hello Ron,

this is a fancy Rover, close to the illustration, missing only the antenna.
Your futuristic work is very impressive, one has to have imagination, keep on dreaming. 

I stay tuned.

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Regards from Germany

Manfred

Under construction:
1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #106 on: 11/23/2014 08:06 PM »
I have to find a tiny antenna for it, lol.  That sounds like something you would be searching for!

Offline roma847

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #107 on: 11/23/2014 09:58 PM »
I'm sure, you'll find something suitable.

My friend Michael used for the grid an old protection net in a washing machine, but it's for an antenna of a paper model Apollo SM (1:12), which would be a little to big for your fancy Rover. 


Source: papermodelers.com (mk310149)

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Manfred

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1:144 Launch Pad 39A with Challenger STS-6

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #108 on: 11/24/2014 06:38 AM »
I found this illustration. It is from the early 90s.

Actually it's artwork by David Hardy to illustrate a 1981 paper by Bob Parkinson.  The MEM is somewhat smaller than the NA one.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #109 on: 11/24/2014 06:39 AM »
I added decals to the MEM.  I went in the direction I have been trying to maintain, using shuttle style graphics and logos since this is still 1985 and 1986.  So, a red NASA worm instead of grey, it is Mars after all, and "Challenger" below that as it appeared on the orbiters.  Then, Apollo style "United States" and flag on the ascent stage.

Where did you get them from?
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #110 on: 11/24/2014 11:46 AM »
I added decals to the MEM.  I went in the direction I have been trying to maintain, using shuttle style graphics and logos since this is still 1985 and 1986.  So, a red NASA worm instead of grey, it is Mars after all, and "Challenger" below that as it appeared on the orbiters.  Then, Apollo style "United States" and flag on the ascent stage.

Where did you get them from?

The decals?  The Challenger came from the Airfix kit and the NASA worm is from a sheet of NASA logos I have had a few years.   I found it on ebay.  The CSM decals are from an aftermarket Saturn IB set from Space Model Systems.

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #111 on: 12/08/2014 08:53 PM »
I have started cutting plastic for the Mars One model. This book was published in 1985 and was done by the same people who did the shuttle crew manual.  This mission was to have taken place in 1996-97 and been constructed in orbit with space shuttles.  And with the cooperation of the Soviet Union, ESA, India and Japan.  A crew of 11 was to launch to Mars on March 7, 1996, and using a Venus flyby, arrive at Mars on February 20, 1997.  4 members of the crew land on Mars for a 23 day stay on the surface while the rest mapped the planet and studied Phobos and Deimos.  They were to leave Martian orbit March 22 and return to Earth orbit on December 7, 1997.  They would remain in an orbital quarantine facility until December 21, when they would return to Earth by space shuttle.  The spaceship would require 28 shuttle flights for assembly and fuel, 6 Ariane IV launches for hardware and 5 launches of the Soviet G1 rocket, whatever that is.....

I built a model of this back in 1985, using two of Revell's Orbital Operations Center model.  But of course, they were in the hobby store and easier to obtain back then.  And not totally accurate.  So now I intend to build it using Plastuct tubes.  I have started by cutting and starting assembly of the four modules.  One end of each module is flat, and has observation windows. The other end has the same cone as the Spacelab Module.  I cut up two spare modules for those ends. 
« Last Edit: 12/08/2014 08:57 PM by Ronpur50 »

Offline Bob Shaw

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #112 on: 12/08/2014 09:16 PM »
Mat Irvine built a nice lander and rover many years ago (1973ish!), using the 1/48 Revell CM as the basis for the lander and a variety of Airfix astronaut figures - it made use of the CM mould line and didn't reveal the interior gubbins at all. I'm sure there are photographs out there on the InterWeb somewhere.

I've been working for some time on a NERVA Ares model, which uses Airfix Saturn V elements, mixed and matched. The NERVA tanks are SIC stages from the engine bays forward, with the LOX dome brought forward to fill the void below the Interstage. The SII Thrust structure is cleaned up, leaving only the central engine mount stub for the NERVA engine to sit on, while four HE spheres are fitted where the J2 mounts were. The SII forward cone is attached to the forward face of the NERVA stage, and the manned spacecraft core is essentially the S-IVB. On the front of the S-IVB, upside down, is half of the front of an SII, with the cone extending out to make the cylindrical MEM and probes garage. The S-IVB has most of the original external bumps removed and Plastruct is used to hide seams etc. The whole assembly has two dish antennae on posts.

In terms of surface treatment, again a nod to the Shuttle with a granular foam texture on the big H2 tank and masking tape patches on the manned spacecraft, along with sections of aluminium tape where there might be radiators. No solar panels, of course - this baby was ATOMIC!

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #113 on: 12/08/2014 11:31 PM »
That sounds great, Bob!  I would love to see pics of your build.

I did a little more tonight.  I made the center connecting tunnels and attached two of the habitats.  I will have to wait on the other two, since their glue is still drying. 

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #114 on: 12/10/2014 10:47 PM »
I have attached the main modules to the middle connecting tunnels.  They still need a bit of adjustment.  Next up will be the outer connecting tunnels.  I realized I will have to detail the modules before I glue both sides together. 

Offline mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #115 on: 12/10/2014 11:18 PM »
Looks good Ron.  I hope you don't mind, I redid the interior of one of the modules from the Space Operation Centers and configured it for a Mars Lander.  Her are some shots to motivate you a little.  :)

Edit.  I'm not sure why the photos are all misoriented.  :(
« Last Edit: 12/10/2014 11:24 PM by mike robel »

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #116 on: 12/10/2014 11:42 PM »
Oh, I like that!  A great Mars Hab!

Offline mike robel

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #117 on: 12/11/2014 01:00 AM »
Thanks Ron...

Offline Dalhousie

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #118 on: 12/14/2014 08:57 AM »
I really like the horizontal lander.  there is a lot going for this configuration.
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Modelling Mars
« Reply #119 on: 12/19/2014 03:27 AM »
I thought I would play around with my Gimp and make some photos of Ares in space. 

First, is the docking of the Ares segments in orbit after launch.  I have modified the model a bit to add thrusters to the Mission Module so it can perform it's maneuvers both in Earth orbit and Mars orbit.  I also removed the big flag decal from the MS-II and replaced it with the red "United States'' as described in the book.  I also had to modify the MS-IVB stage so it could have folded solar arrays for the TMI burn.

And next is the start of the TMI burn as Ares begins her journey to Mars.
I made two views of this.  Not sure I like the second one much.
« Last Edit: 12/19/2014 03:30 AM by Ronpur50 »

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