Author Topic: NASA EM-1 Cubesat Competition - Lunar Propulsion/Comms - Deep Space Comms  (Read 3979 times)

Offline AnalogMan

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NASA has just issued a Request For Information (RFI) on cubesat competitions to be held under the Centennial Challenges Program.

Winners will get to fly on SLS EM-1 mission as secondary payloads.  A total of $5.5m is available for distribution to winners of two separate challenges.

https://www.fbo.gov/spg/NASA/HQ/OPHQDC/NNH14STMD004L/listing.html

Lunar Communication and Propulsion Challenge Overview

The CubeSat Lunar Challenge is designed to foster innovations in small spacecraft propulsion and communications techniques for small satellite systems. The Challenge will consist of a Ground Qualification Competition and in-space Lunar Propulsion and Communications Competitions. The spacecraft in these competitions must comply with standard CubeSat design specifications and will be 6U form factor. Specific Challenge requirements and prize allocations are defined in section 5.

This Challenge will award up to a total of $3,000,000 in cash prizes to registered competitors that are able to meet or exceed technical objectives for 1) propulsion and 2) communication while in orbit around the Moon.

The Ground Qualification Competition Phase will be held to determine which competitors will be offered the opportunity for a NASA provided launch opportunity as a secondary payload on Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1), the first launch (EM-1) of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion crew vehicle planned for Fiscal Year 2018. The CubeSats selected for the EM-1 flight will be deployed on a trans-lunar insertion trajectory. Up to a total of $500,000 in cash prizes will be available in Ground Qualification Competition Phase.

NASA will award the following Lunar Propulsion Competition prize:

the Lunar Propulsion Prize of $1,500,000 will be divided equally between all Competitor Teams that establish a verifiable lunar orbit, as defined in Section 5.3, Rule 7: Lunar Orbit Operations and that are compliant with all other Rules.

NASA will award the following Lunar Communication Competition prizes:

  1. $250,000 will be awarded to the Competitor Team that receives the largest cumulative volume of error-free data from their CubeSat over their best 30-minute period from lunar orbit before the end of competition.

  2. $750,000 will be awarded to the Competitor Team that receives the largest cumulative volume of error free data from their CubeSat over their best contiguous 28-day period from lunar orbit before the end of competition.

  3. $500,000 will be awarded to the last Competitor Team that receives the very last, error-free, 1024-bit data block from their CubeSat from lunar orbit at least 28 days after Start of Competition for their CubeSat and before the End of Competition.

https://prod.nais.nasa.gov/eps/eps_data/160988-OTHER-001-001.pdf


Deep Space Communications Challenge Overview

The CubeSat Deep Space Communications Challenge is designed to foster innovations in communications techniques for small satellite systems. The Challenge will consist of a Ground Qualification Competition and an in-space Deep Space Communications Competition. The spacecraft in these competitions must comply with standard CubeSat design specifications and will be 6U form factor. Specific Challenge requirements and prize allocations are defined in section 5.

The Ground Qualification Competition Phase will be held to determine which competitors will be offered the opportunity for a NASA provided launch opportunity as a secondary payload on Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1), the first launch (EM-1) of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion crew vehicle planned for Fiscal Year 2018. The CubeSats selected for the EM-1 flight will be deployed on a trans-lunar insertion trajectory. Up to a total of $500,000 in cash prizes will be available in Ground Qualification Competition Phase.

NASA will award the following Deep Space Communication Competition prizes:

1. $250,000 will be awarded to the Competitor Team that receives the largest cumulative, error‐free volume of data from their CubeSat over their best 30- minute period, from at least 4,000,000 kilometers before the end of competition.

2. $750,000 will be awarded to the team that receives the largest cumulative, error-free volume of data from their CubeSat aggregated over their best contiguous 28-day period, from at least 4,000,000 kilometers before the end of competition.

3. $250,000 will be awarded to the last Competitor Team that receives the very last, error-free, 1024-bit data block from their CubeSat from at least 4,000,000 kilometers, at least 28 days after Start of Competition, and before the End of Competition.

4. $250,000 will be awarded to the last Competitor Team that receives from the CubeSat at least one, error-free, 1024-bit data block), from the greatest distance, at least 28 days after Start of Competition, and before the End of Competition.

https://prod.nais.nasa.gov/eps/eps_data/160988-OTHER-001-002.pdf

Offline AnalogMan

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NASA Opens Cube Quest Challenge for Largest-Ever Prize of $5 Million
RELEASE 14-314 November 24, 2014

Registration now is open for NASA's Cube Quest Challenge, the agency’s first in-space competition that offers the agency’s largest-ever prize purse.

Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development, to include a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA's Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System (SLS) rocket.

"NASA's Cube Quest Challenge will engage teams in the development of the new technologies that will advance the state of the art of CubeSats and demonstrate their capabilities as viable deep space explorers," said Michael Gazarik, associate administrator for NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "Prize competitions like this engage the general public and directly contribute to NASA's goals while serving as a tool for open innovation."

Challenge objectives include designing, building and delivering flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

    • Ground Tournaments:  $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have
       the ability to fly on the first SLS flight;

    • Lunar Derby:  $1.5 million for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater
       than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from the Earth to the moon; and

    • Deep Space Derby:  $3 million for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit
       and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable entirely new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

"Cube Quest is an important competition for the agency as well as the commercial space sector," said Eric Eberly, deputy program manager for Centennial Challenges at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. "If we can produce capabilities usually associated with larger spacecraft in the much smaller platform of CubeSats, a dramatic improvement in the affordability of space missions will result, greatly increasing science and research possibilities."

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. The ground tournaments will be held every four to six months and participation is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to non-government spacecraft.

NASA's Centennial Challenges drive progress in aerospace technology -- of significant value to the agency's missions -- and encourage broad-based participation in aerospace research and development. The challenges help find the most innovative solutions to technical challenges through competition and cooperation. There have been 24 Centennial Challenges events since 2005. NASA has awarded more than $6 million to 16 challenge-winning teams.

NASA's Centennial Challenges Program is part of the agency's Space Technology Mission Directorate, which is responsible for innovating, developing, testing and flying hardware for use on future NASA missions. During the next 18 months, the directorate will make significant new investments to address several high-priority challenges for achieving safe and affordable deep space exploration. For more information about the directorate, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacetech

The Centennial Challenges Program is managed at Marshall and the Cube Quest Challenge is administered by the agency's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/cubequest

To learn more about NASA's challenges and citizen science efforts, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/solve



http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/november/nasa-opens-cube-quest-challenge-for-largest-ever-prize-of-5-million-0/
« Last Edit: 11/25/2014 01:58 PM by AnalogMan »

Offline rusty

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Could you clarify the change in the Lunar Competition - what, when and why.

Offline Prober

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Haven't read the fine details, but I'd team up with someone (just another project :o)
email me.

2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Offline catdlr

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bump.....

NASA’s $5.5M Cube Quest Challenge: Advancing Small Satellite Technology

NASA's Marshall Center

Published on May 4, 2016
The Cube Quest competition offers a total of $5.5 million to teams that meet the challenge objectives of designing, building and delivering flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon.

To learn more, visit http://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/centennial_challenges/cubequest/index.html

YouTube Location: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=A0GJ-1ZWyXE



Tony De La Rosa

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