Author Topic: Orion Service Module  (Read 68077 times)

Offline psloss

  • Veteran armchair spectator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16961
  • Liked: 1055
  • Likes Given: 471
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #160 on: 03/29/2017 12:24 PM »
Quote
Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 1m1 minute ago

[Billl] Hill: delivery date for European Service Module for Orion “continues to erode”.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847058569635774464
Mr. Hill said it's September and that's "red" (meaning the schedule is not improving).

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4443
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3010
  • Likes Given: 996
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #161 on: 03/29/2017 12:32 PM »
Quote
Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 7m7 minutes ago

Hill says Airbus having problems getting vendors to supply components for the service module on time; that’s contributing to overall delay.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847061747953418240

Quote
Jeff Foust‏ @jeff_foust 6m6 minutes ago

Hill: software being delivered on time, but some functionality deferred from one version to the next.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/847062169938210816

Online Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13047
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2881
  • Likes Given: 432
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #162 on: 04/07/2017 03:43 AM »
Orion and the European Service Module

Published on Apr 6, 2017

NASA’s Orion spacecraft will take astronauts to destinations at or beyond low Earth orbit. In January 2013, it was announced that ESA would provide the European Service Module (ESM) for Orion’s first uncrewed mission. Derived from ESA’s Automated Transfer Vehicle cargo spacecraft, the ESM will provide life support, propulsion and structural functions for Orion. In February 2017, a contract was signed for a second ESM to be used on Orion’s first crewed flight, which will carry astronauts beyond the Moon and back.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4443
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3010
  • Likes Given: 996
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #163 on: 06/14/2017 01:27 PM »
Quote
Set to be shipped to the USA around the New Year, ESA’s contribution to NASA’s Orion spacecraft is taking shape at Airbus in Bremen, Germany. This is no test article: the service module pictured here will fly into space by 2020, past the Moon and farther than any other human-rated spacecraft has ever flown before.

The service module will supply electricity, water, oxygen and nitrogen, propulsion and temperature control.

The blue circular frame is the support structure that holds the module as technicians work to get it ready. Yellow ties keep the 11 km of wiring in place as the thousands of components are installed and connected – the ties will be removed before flight. Behind the red support covers are the eight 490 N R-4D-11 thrusters, built by Aerojet.

Technicians are working in three shifts a day to assemble the components that are being shipped from all over Europe to complete this service module in just a few months’ time. In December it will be taken by road to Bremen airport and flown to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to meet its crew capsule.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2017/06/Orion_frame_work

Offline hektor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1265
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 2

Online Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13047
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 2881
  • Likes Given: 432
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #165 on: 08/18/2017 01:25 PM »
https://twitter.com/AirbusSpace/status/898455783930834945

"1st successful test for @NASA_Orion's propulsion module. Hot firing test starts campaign at @NASA White Sands. Info: http://bit.ly/2fPYVw8"

https://orionesm.airbusdefenceandspace.com/blog/orion-propulsion-test/

"Hot firing test mark the start of the Orion test campaign at NASA White Sands

The Propulsion Qualification Module (PQM) is a test module for Orion’s mission critical propulsion system. Currently Airbus, ESA and NASA engineers run a test campaign  at the NASA test facility in White Sands (US, New Mexico). Although the PQM and its four propellant tanks will never see space, this is an important step in the development of the Orion programme. Complex systems must first be tested and qualified on Earth before being used as flight hardware in space. The challenge in manufacturing the test tanks was therefore to satisfy the numerous technical specifications, such as cleanliness, fuel compatibility and watertightness, that will also apply to the real propulsion system.

"It is an important milestone, a huge success for the whole team and it perfectly demonstrates our engineering competence. My congratulations to the team but let’s not forget that we still have more tests to come."

Bas Theelen, Orion Programme Manager, Airbus

The flight model will have 33 engines to provide thrust and to manoeuvre the spacecraft on all axes. The test module is equipped with less engines, among them a re-used engine which last flight occurred in 2011 with Space Shuttle Atlantis (OMS–E: Orbital Manoeuvre System Engine). “I am delighted to see these first successful hot firings” says Bas Theelen, Orion Programme Manager at Airbus Space Systems.The test campaign is expected to be terminated at the end of 2017 or the beginning of 2018."
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4443
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3010
  • Likes Given: 996
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #166 on: 12/04/2017 02:07 PM »
Quote
European Service Module Structure

In a series of blog posts based on images taken at the Thales Alenia Space facility in Turin, Italy, we will now have a look at part of Orion’s structure.

This tank bulkhead made of aluminium forms the top platform of the second European Service Module – the one that will fly with astronauts. It is almost 5 metres in diameter.

These pictures show work on the top bulkhead that is located inside the Crew Module Adapter directly under the Crew Module Heat Shield of Orion’s second exploration mission

The bulkhead is a key part of the primary structure providing structural rigidity to the Orion spacecraft much like the chassis of a car. It absorbs the vibrations and energy from launch.

The round holes in the bulkhead allow for tanks to poke through. The four larger holes are for tanks that each hold 2000 l of propellant while the four smaller holes are for three oxygen tanks, and one nitrogen tank.

In the middle of the structure is a square opening for cabling, and helium tanks, more on this part in another blog entry tomorrow…

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2017/12/04/european-service-module-structure/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4443
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3010
  • Likes Given: 996
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #167 on: 12/06/2017 07:41 AM »
Quote
5 Dec 2017
Orion’s European Service Module “Wall” Panels

In a series of blog posts based on images taken at Thales Alenia Space building facility in Turin, Italy, we will have a look at the vertical panels that form part of Orion’s European Service Module primary structure, these images show work on the second service module that will propel astronauts beyond the Moon and provide essentials such as water, air, electricity and power.

The black panels are prepared on a table before being installed into the Service Module vertically. They are made of a lightweight composite material known as carbon-fibre reinforced-plastic. The honeycomb structure provides rigidity while keeping weight down.

The large holes when installed keep the weight down even more but also allow the technicians and engineers access to the mass of meticulously laid cables to be installed – over 11 km in total! The silver circles are mounting points for equipment and cables. Most of these will be installed in Bremen, Germany, at the Airbus integration hall where the complete service module is assembled.

Inside the four panels two helium tanks will be installed that will be used to push propellant to Orion’s engines during its mission.

Brackets for holding the tank bulkheads (discussed in this blog post) are already attached to the bottom bulkhead and ready for installing the top bulkhead. In the photo below the engineers are standing in the hole that allows room for the propellant tanks.

These images show the beginnings of the spacecraft structure that will send human beings further from Earth than ever before – we will keep you updated in more blog posts.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2017/12/05/orions-european-service-module-wall-panels/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4443
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 3010
  • Likes Given: 996
Re: Orion Service Module
« Reply #168 on: 12/06/2017 06:12 PM »
Quote
6 Dec 2017
Orion Service Module-2 Structure Complete

Wrapping up our blog entries on the frame of the second European Service module for Orion, these pictures show the completed internal structure for Flight Model-2. It will support up to four astronauts and send them further than any human being has ever been from Earth in a few years.

The pictures show the two circular tank bulkheads in place, bolted to the vertical panels. The top ring will attach to the Crew Module Adapter that connects the Orion capsule to the service module.

The pictures were taken at the Thales Alenia Space facility in Turin, Italy, in November 2017.

This structure can be seen as the chassis of the Orion spacecraft, providing structural rigidity while absorbing vibrations and energy from launch.

The holes are to save weight and accommodate future payloads. It will also hold all the other elements together such as the spacecraft’s thrusters, water tanks, fuel tanks, gas tanks, electronics and wires.
The top bulkhead is thicker as it handles more loads. Orion’s storage tanks are supported from the top bulkhead which distributes the forces from 9 tonnes of propellant between the European Service Module structure and NASA structures such as the Crew Module Adapter and the launcher fairing, while the lower platform “only” provides support to prevent the tanks from swinging.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2017/12/06/orion-service-module-2-structure-complete/
« Last Edit: 12/06/2017 06:12 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Tags: