Author Topic: Ernest A. Lamont  (Read 4841 times)

Offline pagheca

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Ernest A. Lamont
« on: 03/26/2014 02:08 PM »
I was looking over the internet about Ernest A. Lamont, but found almost nothing. Not even a brief Wikipedia page and this really surprised me.

Right... who was him?

Many people here know for sure him, but he is virtually unknown to the general public, and this really surprise me as he is for sure one of the most valent and prodigious Engineer in rocket history.

I found his name years ago, while looking for information about the turbopump used by the most powerful single chamber rocket engine ever, the mighty F-1 that powered the first stage of Saturn V without a single (catastrophic) failure. I'm a bit obsessed by the F-1 since years ago I was looking as part of my professional life for a bearing for a very specific work and tried to find out some information about the F-1 turbopump but couldn't find what the hell they used for that wonderfull machine in the turbopump.
 
I understood that the F-1 turbopump design was used also for the SSME RS-25 and in many other rocket engines. Lamont, at the time a young engineer at Rocketdyne, was the chief designer of the turbopump for the E-1/F-1. "His hand written original calculations are part of the family archives and available for display. He stated that the design of the rocket engine hinged on the question of whether the pump design was viable." (from Wikipedia F-1 description).

Every time I investigate about the F-1, realized by Rocketdyne since the fifties (and in less than 10 years), I come to the conclusion that the group of Engineers that worked on that design were probably visitors from another, much more evolved Planet and civilization... I can't really understand how, with the computing capability, the resources, and the materials and knowledge of the time, someone can come out with something like that, and in a "few" years. It's like if a Formula One (F1, btw) built in the fifties would be able to overcome a present day Ferrary or Red Bull. With the difference that they started almost from zero, nada, nothing... while sport cars are around from a century.

I have been involved in several (ground based) state-of-the-art scientific ventures, and I always think that the people I met there couldn't make a successful landing and return of a man in 50 years, starting from now and with the same budget. :)

I would appreciate if someone may help me in finding information about him. How old he was, what he did later. It is the minimum tribute his country should give to him and to the bunch of key people behind rocket development in the '50-'60.

With all my sense of appreciation for that amazing period of the US history...
« Last Edit: 03/26/2014 02:11 PM by pagheca »

Offline ringshot

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #1 on: 03/26/2014 02:18 PM »
Perhaps you should start a wiki page for him?

G'Day...Ron
G'Day...Ron

Offline pagheca

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #2 on: 03/26/2014 02:56 PM »
Do you mean a Wikipedia page? I ne er tried and in any case I would need more information about him.
Ciao,
p

Online edkyle99

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #3 on: 03/26/2014 03:32 PM »
In case you haven't read this book, "Rocketdyne - Powering Humans into Space", here is a link.  It was written by an old Rocketdyne hand who lists many of the key individuals involved in development of the important engines, including F-1.

http://books.google.com/books?id=7m7Uq-B6RbYC&lpg=PP1&dq=history%20of%20rocketdyne&pg=PA165#v=onepage&q=history%20of%20rocketdyne&f=false

F-1 wasn't actually that much of a technical stretch, except for the sheer size of the thing.  Rocketdyne decided early on to use very conservative design margins, to make sure they could build something that worked.  Combustion stability was the biggest challenge.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 03/26/2014 03:33 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline Archibald

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #4 on: 03/26/2014 05:30 PM »
I had a similar story a while back. I researched another great F1 engineer with the name of Adelbert O. Tischler. So I can give you some tips for the internet research (that, and I'm a librarian)
The complete name never works. Forget "Ernest A. Lamont" and try instead "Lamont, EA." 
I did a search on the AIAA website and found a 1973 document. Looks like he was still working at Rocketdyne, on the space tug propulsion system.
http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.1973-1245

Google books is also extremely useful.

https://www.google.fr/?gfe_rd=cr&ei=LxszU8CAKdT88QO40oGYCA#q=%22Rocketdyne%22%22Lamont%22%22tug%22&tbm=bks

https://www.google.fr/search?q=%22Lamont%2C+EA%22%22rocket%22&biw=1024&bih=665&sa=X&ei=VRwzU9TGK6io0AXul4GQAQ&ved=0CCUQpwUoBA&source=lnt&tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F1960%2Ccd_max%3A31%2F12%2F1970&tbm=bks#q=%22Lamont%2C+EA%22%22rocket%22&tbas=0&tbm=bks

Hope this help a little !
« Last Edit: 03/26/2014 05:31 PM by Archibald »

Offline pagheca

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #5 on: 03/27/2014 09:36 PM »
thanks for the many links and information, guys. Does anyone knows how old was at the time? When was he born? What he did later in his career? I will try to buy that book about Rocketdyne. Everyone talk very well about it but unfortunately I live in a country were Amazon is not promptly available (and there is no kindle edition).

If i collect enough information I will give wikipedia a try. Promised!

I wonder if there is a clear understanding about the really key people on the moon missions. Any book that don't focus mainly on the "Man on the Moon" but more on the management effort that was of almost unprecedented difficulty, risks and complexitily for civil projects. Further suggestions welcome.

pgc

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #6 on: 03/27/2014 10:20 PM »
The book "Apollo" by Charles Murray and Catherine Bly-Cox is an excellent telling of the management and engineering challenges faced by NASA in the 60s.

And it has a Kindle edition.

-Doug
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline pagheca

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #7 on: 03/28/2014 05:52 PM »
thanks. Got it on my kindle.

Offline CTAtilano

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #8 on: 10/06/2017 08:55 PM »
Hi, you can imagine my surprise, when doing another search of my uncle's work history, having previously only found one noteworthy copyright listing him as the engineer. Ernest Armand Lamont born Ernest Armund Atilano on February 22,1926 in Los Angeles, CA. The oldest of three brothers and one sister. I am the son of the youngest brother, Charles Edward Atilano.

Ernest A. Lamont graduated from Garfield High School in Los Ageles, CA in 1944. His post high school learning involved attending Northrop Aeronautical Institute and UCLA where I believe he received his Engineering degree.

Please feel free to contact me through this site for any further information.

Offline CTAtilano

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #9 on: 10/06/2017 09:05 PM »
Additionally, Ernest a Lamont was also drafted while still in high school. He served in the US Air Force during World War II in the German conflict.

Offline CTAtilano

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Re: Ernest A. Lamont
« Reply #10 on: 10/09/2017 06:02 PM »
Correction: Born: Ernest Armando Atilano.
He died May 23, 1999.

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