Author Topic: Orbital's success in space reflected in the balance sheets  (Read 4809 times)

Online Chris Bergin

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/02/orbitals-success-reflected-balance-sheets/

I don't normally cover financial stuff, but Orbital always release some cool info and some nice quotes, so wrote it up.

Ironically, a year ago I was thinking "If I had some money I'd absolutely buy a load of shares in Orbital". Of course, I have no money, and I've missed out big time! ;D

Over 10 dollars higher than a year ago!
http://tinyurl.com/nfohudz

Offline robertross

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17799
  • Westphal, Nova Scotia
  • Liked: 462
  • Likes Given: 4009
Nice plug Chris.

I always believe it's in the best interest of all of us that these companies do well. Each has something to offer, and there should be room enough for each to do well (not merely survive).
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline arachnitect

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1440
  • Liked: 387
  • Likes Given: 462
Nice article Chris. I'm happy Orbital is keeping busy.

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28050
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 7861
  • Likes Given: 5234
Nice plug Chris.

I always believe it's in the best interest of all of us that these companies do well. Each has something to offer, and there should be room enough for each to do well (not merely survive).
Orbital is especially well-suited to the new industry environment. They can reap big rewards if domestic launch costs fall dramatically, but if they don't fall, they can still be very successful with Antares and Stratolaunch, and their horizontal integration strategy in general leaves them much less exposed to risk.
« Last Edit: 02/14/2014 12:36 PM by Robotbeat »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Avron

  • Canadian Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4924
  • Liked: 150
  • Likes Given: 152
Hindsight and exact science..

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Remember that they sell more spacecrafts than rockets - they sold at least 3 Star bus geostationary comsats last year, not to mention they also have LEO and interplanetary spacecraft experience. We already saw one OSC-built comsat launching last month (Thaicom 6) and another will be launched next month (Amazonas 4A on Ariane 5). And I haven't count their missile & defense contracts yet....
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline baldusi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7437
  • Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Liked: 1442
  • Likes Given: 4499
I remember Dr. Antonio Elías stating that he wished the Falcon 9 was successful and ridiculously cheap, because then they would sell an awful lot of satellites.

Online Chris Bergin

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/03/ariane-5-eca-astra-5b-amazonas-4a-mission/

Another Orbital baby heading uphill tonight.

Quote
Orbital’s newest satellite delivery represents the 150th spacecraft Orbital has completed for customers in the past 32 years, spanning the global commercial, civil government and military and intelligence space systems markets.

Of these, 78 have carried out commercial communications and imaging missions and 72 have supported government scientific, national security and space exploration missions.

Offline Space Pete

Can't think of anywhere else to put this, so I'll stick it here.

An interesting fact relating to Orbital:

On 25 March 2014, the British Royal Air Force retired the last of their L-1011 TriStar aircraft. Apparently the only L-1011 confirmed as being operational anywhere in the world is now the Stargazer.

Does anyone know whether OSC fly the Stargazer on a regular basis in order to maintain pilot proficiency? Or does it only fly in relation to a specific launch (it which case, will it ever fly again)?

Just thought I'd share that for those interested. :)
NASASpaceflight ISS Editor

Online rayleighscatter

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Maryland
  • Liked: 464
  • Likes Given: 220
It's last flight was December 3rd so it doesn't appear to be that active outside of launches. But so long as someone wants to buy a Pegasus I assume it will keep flying (until an alternate like the Stratolaunch comes online).

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8643
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1112
  • Likes Given: 242
Re: Orbital's success in space reflected in the balance sheets
« Reply #10 on: 03/31/2014 03:58 PM »
Looks like the twitterverse has discovered this fact. Just retweeted by @orbitalsciences

https://twitter.com/ikluft/status/449945533356843009/photo/1

Quote
L-1011's are rare now. But @orbitalsciences Stargazer is easily found at #Mojave. #avgeek #aviation pic.twitter.com/vblliQg2lj

If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline Lurker Steve

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1420
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: Orbital's success in space reflected in the balance sheets
« Reply #11 on: 03/31/2014 04:15 PM »
It's last flight was December 3rd so it doesn't appear to be that active outside of launches. But so long as someone wants to buy a Pegasus I assume it will keep flying (until an alternate like the Stratolaunch comes online).

I assume there are plenty of L-1011's sitting in the desert, available for spare parts. How much maintenance is necessary for a plane that doesn't need to fly that often ?

Online rayleighscatter

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Maryland
  • Liked: 464
  • Likes Given: 220
Re: Orbital's success in space reflected in the balance sheets
« Reply #12 on: 03/31/2014 10:21 PM »
Oh yeah, piles of L1011s they can get parts from in the desert, in fact I think some of them are even at Mojave. Considering the cost of launch most maintenance on it is probably negligible. The big one, the D check, though will cost probably in the region of 10 million and take about 30,000 man hours. I wonder how many years away from that they are.

In their unusual position with the plane there's a lot of options they have to deal with many issues. Northrop Grumman for instance flies a BAC-111 even though its airworthiness certificate was withdrawn, they just reclassified the plane as experimental. I wouldn't be surprised if Orbital did the same if they start to run into regulatory issues with the L1011.

Offline kevin-rf

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8643
  • Overlooking the path Mary's little Lamb took..
  • Liked: 1112
  • Likes Given: 242
Re: Orbital's success in space reflected in the balance sheets
« Reply #13 on: 04/01/2014 12:07 PM »
Geeze, Now I feel old, I remember flying on BAC-111's as a kid.
If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Tags: