Author Topic: LIVE: Orbital's Antares/Cygnus ORB-1 (CRS-1) LAUNCH UPDATES - Jan 9, 2014  (Read 74207 times)

Offline Lee Jay

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Thanks for the ride, Antares :)

Two objects on Space Track:
39502: 267 x 230 km, 51.62 degrees
39503: 247 x 217 km, 51.66 degrees

Target appears to have been 210 km x 298 km, 51.64.

http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/files/Mission%20Overview.pdf
« Last Edit: 01/09/2014 11:58 PM by Lee Jay »

Offline grythumn

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Had some tripod trouble, and nearly didn't make it down to the Old Ferry launch in time. These were taken with my 70-300 and a 1.4 TC.

-Bob

Offline SaxtonHale

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Ooh, you got closer than I did! Tell me your secret location!
(First one is an animation)
« Last Edit: 01/10/2014 01:43 AM by SaxtonHale »

Offline Alpha Control

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Congratulations Orbital! What a great way to kick off their operational contract services. And truly a great start to 2014, as both Orbital and SpaceX begin the year with successful launches.

I wish I could have been there in person today, like I was for the Orb-D1 flight in September. But it was great to be able to follow on NSF, while chained to my desk at work.
« Last Edit: 01/10/2014 01:56 AM by Alpha Control »
Space launches attended:
Antares/Cygnus ORB-D1 Wallops Island, VA Sept 2013 | STS-123 KSC, FL March 2008 | SpaceShipOne Mojave, CA June 2004

Offline runaground

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Big congratulations to Orbital and NASA Wallops teams for another successful launch!  And thanks to the NSF denizens for the frequent live updates -- they were a nice distraction from gradually freezing out there...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thephillyfly/sets/72157639603916425/

Online Artyom.

"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline input~2

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Two objects on Space Track:
39502: 230 x 267 km, 51.62 degrees
39503: 217 x 247 km, 51.66 degrees
Target appears to have been 210 km x 298 km, 51.64.
I have slightly different figures from the first TLEs:
2014-003A/39502 in 222 x 260 km x 51.62
2014-003B/39503 in 209 x 239 km x 51.66
« Last Edit: 01/10/2014 09:05 AM by input~2 »

Offline pericynthion

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I think we used different definitions of earth radius.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Orbital Sciences ‏@OrbitalSciences

Quote
#Orb1 mission status: #Cygnus doing great. 400x420 km orbit. 1000 km behind #ISS - and closing. 4 thruster burns already completed. @NASA

https://twitter.com/OrbitalSciences/statuses/421683851803385856

Online Galactic Penguin SST

For book-keeping purposes: the different cameras at the launch pad shows that the actual launch time is 18:07:08Z = 1:07:08 pm EST (with engine ignition 2 seconds earlier), as compared to the Antares and Cygnus demo launches.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline anik

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For book-keeping purposes: the different cameras at the launch pad shows that the actual launch time is 18:07:08Z = 1:07:08 pm EST (with engine ignition 2 seconds earlier), as compared to the Antares and Cygnus demo launches

The problem is that official time of engine's ignition was at 18:07:05 UTC (see CBS News or Spaceflight Now), so liftoff was in 2 seconds, i.e at 18:07:07.

But may be they are wrong...

Approximate times in UTC (from videos):

Launch           Flame                  Motion
Orb-TF            21:00:00.788      21:00:02.857
Orb-D             14:58:00.677      14:58:02.876
Orb-1             18:07:06.782      18:07:08.584

Offline input~2

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I think we used different definitions of earth radius.
Yes.
Apparently I use the same as SpaceTrack:
I found exactly their values below  corresponding to
Payload  at epoch Jan 10, 1150UTC
2nd stage (rocket body) at epoch Jan 9, 2229UTC

INTLDES   NORAD_CAT_ID   OBJECT_TYPE        SATNAME   INCLINATION   APOGEE   PERIGEE   
2014-003B   39503            ROCKET BODY      ANTARES R/B      51.64           230         208   
2014-003A   39502            PAYLOAD              CYGNUS 0RB-1    51.61          262         219

Offline Danderman

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New Science, NASA Cargo Launches to Space Station Aboard Orbital-1 Mission

http://www.telegraphindia.com/pressrelease/prnw/dc43888.html

Small, relatively inexpensive satellites collectively referred to as CubeSats will provide a variety of technology demonstrations. They will be launched using the NanoRacks Smallsat Deployment Program from the station's Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) airlock. The NanoRacks CubeSats will be deployed with the JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer.  ArduSat-2 is a CubeSat built and operated by NanoSatisfi of San Francisco, which will help determine potential commercial applications for CubeSat data collection and commercial off-the-shelf electronics. Testing sensors through this mini-satellite format may help lower the cost of applications that use low-Earth observation techniques.

Offline SaxtonHale

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I stabilized my shaky liftoff sequence

Offline Targeteer

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From Facebook

Orbital Sciences Corporation
All Cygnus systems are performing as expected with no issues. The spacecraft has conducted five orbit-raising maneuvers and is on track for rendezvous with the International Space Station tomorrow morning, with a target time for capture by the space station's robotic arm at 6:02 am EST (11:02 GMT). NASA TV coverage of rendezvous with the space station will begin at 5:00 am EST.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online Chris Bergin

Reminder: We'll be going to the live updates for RNDZ and Berthing later today, given it all kicks off very early tomorrow (for most people).

Offline yg1968

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Here is the full launch coverage:

Offline Barrie

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It's been a great start to the year - GSLV, Falcon9, Antares.

Watching the previous post video, I see a significant translation to the left at the moment of lift-off. Anything to worry about?

Offline ugordan

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Watching the previous post video, I see a significant translation to the left at the moment of lift-off. Anything to worry about?

TEL avoidance maneuver.

Offline Lee Jay

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Watching the previous post video, I see a significant translation to the left at the moment of lift-off. Anything to worry about?

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33743.msg1145673#msg1145673

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