Author Topic: LIVE: Chang'e-3 lunar probe and rover Lunar Landing December 14, 2013  (Read 297059 times)

Offline Phil Stooke

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"Resolution is even worse than Pathfinder 1997 first panorama! :-("

No, it's better.  The original is much better.  We don't have that yet, but we will.  Meanwhile, reflect on the work that went into creating the miserable version of the pan you have before you now.  (Merry Christmas!)

Phil

Offline Will

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"Resolution is even worse than Pathfinder 1997 first panorama! :-("

No, it's better.  The original is much better.  We don't have that yet, but we will.  Meanwhile, reflect on the work that went into creating the miserable version of the pan you have before you now.  (Merry Christmas!)

Phil


Thanks for this. Can you tell us how it was created from what the Chinese have made available?

Will

Offline jumpjack

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"Resolution is even worse than Pathfinder 1997 first panorama! :-("

No, it's better.  The original is much better.
I'm sure it is. As it is the descent video, shot at 1024x1024 pixel (while the "HD" video on youtube has just a bunch of pixels). But it has not yet been released... and it does not look like it will ever be. :-( Not until Chang'e 4 at least. :-(

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Offline Will

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Quote
Looks lovely, but I have to say it's really beginning to make me crazy that the "release" is a video camera panning around a television monitor.

Doesn't surprise me in the least.
It as it is nigh on impossible to get any stills, never mind hi res images about the Chinese space programe. Never seen a single image of Tiangong (apart from TV) in orbit for instance.

Keith

It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason. How different, how very different is the information policy of our own dear NASA!

Will

Offline savuporo

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It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason.
They have different processes for publishing the data, slower than some NASA missions but not unheard of. They do publish the data, carefully and meticulously.
Maybe they ALSO have a bunch of important PhDs with first dibs to get their papers published ?
Orion - the first and only manned not-too-deep-space craft

Offline Warren Platts

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t = ton

Shouldn't that be "t = tonne"
"Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.--Leonardo Da Vinci

Offline RonM

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t = ton

Shouldn't that be "t = tonne"

Not if Jason1701 means 2000 pounds in US Customary Units or 2,240 pounds in Imperial Units.

If Jason1701 means 1000 kg, then it should be tonne.

Life would be easier if my fellow Americans let go of tradition and switched to the metric system.

Offline Liss

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Yutu is on the move again! On December 21 she made 21 meters from the B waypoint through C to D, probably resting to the south of the lander.

Quote
新华网北京12月21日电
截至12月21日20时05分,在北京航天飞行控制中心的遥操作控制下,玉兔号月球车顺利由B点行驶至C点和D点,行程约21米,在C点和D点均进行了全景相像、导航相机等图像成像和下传工作。北京中心根据实时传回的遥测数据分析判断,着陆器、月球车各分系统工作正常稳定。

Google translation:
Quote
Xinhua Beijing December 21
As at 20:05 on December 21, in the remote operation control Beijing Aerospace Control Center, "rabbit" was the lunar rover successfully traveling from point B to point C and D, travel about 21 meters, at point C and D were carried out panorama likeness, image cameras and other imaging and navigation downstream work. Beijing center according to the real-time telemetry data returned by analysis and judgment, lander, the rover subsystems working properly stabilized.

Seems to be a new image:

« Last Edit: 12/21/2013 07:28 PM by Liss »

Offline savuporo

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Seems to be a new image:

Seems like framegrab from the video in here
http://www.chinanews.com/gn/2013/12-21/5647870.shtml

There is also a top view of the landing area and presumably the rovers traverse
http://news.sohu.com/20131221/n392176417.shtml
« Last Edit: 12/21/2013 07:40 PM by savuporo »
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Offline jumpjack

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It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason.
They have different processes for publishing the data, slower than some NASA missions but not unheard of. They do publish the data, carefully and meticulously.
What I don't understand is: once they've sent data to national TV which also airs over internet, what else do they need to wait to release raw data?!?
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Offline Liss

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Seems like framegrab from the video in here
http://www.chinanews.com/gn/2013/12-21/5647870.shtml



From Youtube above but it's probably the same news item.
« Last Edit: 12/21/2013 07:51 PM by Liss »

Offline savuporo

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What I don't understand is: once they've sent data to national TV which also airs over internet, what else do they need to wait to release raw data?!?
It doesnt look like CCTV / CNTV are getting any "data" apart from carefully prepared video at this point, hence everything that gets posted anywhere are blurry video frame grabs like these

http://news.cntv.cn/2013/12/21/PHOA1387590503017494.shtml#g=1

These clips are just plain video frame stills from the video they used in this report

http://english.cntv.cn/program/china24/20131221/104383.shtml

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Offline AJA

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It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason.
They have different processes for publishing the data, slower than some NASA missions but not unheard of. They do publish the data, carefully and meticulously.
What I don't understand is: once they've sent data to national TV which also airs over internet, what else do they need to wait to release raw data?!?


Obviously for the same reason you're not satisfied with the TV grab, and are craving the raw images.
I wouldn't be surprised if some science communication / media organisation in China had access to the high-res versions first - (for a yet-to-be-aired documentary perhaps?) similar to proprietary access periods for scientific data. After all, Mars One's basing their business plan on that. Maybe China wanted to do a pilot with Chang'E 3?

Anyway..let's stop whining over this.. please?
« Last Edit: 12/21/2013 08:05 PM by AJA »

Offline MadCow

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It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason.
They have different processes for publishing the data, slower than some NASA missions but not unheard of. They do publish the data, carefully and meticulously.
What I don't understand is: once they've sent data to national TV which also airs over internet, what else do they need to wait to release raw data?!?
From the look of it, CNSA didn't release any data to CCTV, instead, the later had the access to CNSA control room and reported what they saw on the big screen, obviously with the consent from CNSA.

Offline Chris Bergin

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Anyway..let's stop whining over this.. please?

Not much whining to be fair. You should see some of the SLS (exploration plan - frustration with it) threads....as much as we moderate via the true meaning of moderation.

We will keep it calm on all threads, per the forum rules.

Offline Will

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It's almost as though they aren't entirely comfortable with freedom of information, for some reason.
They have different processes for publishing the data, slower than some NASA missions but not unheard of. They do publish the data, carefully and meticulously.
What I don't understand is: once they've sent data to national TV which also airs over internet, what else do they need to wait to release raw data?!?


Obviously for the same reason you're not satisfied with the TV grab, and are craving the raw images.
I wouldn't be surprised if some science communication / media organisation in China had access to the high-res versions first - (for a yet-to-be-aired documentary perhaps?) similar to proprietary access periods for scientific data. After all, Mars One's basing their business plan on that. Maybe China wanted to do a pilot with Chang'E 3?

Anyway..let's stop whining over this.. please?

Not whining, cobber. No huhu.  Just saying that China is slow to share original data compared to NASA and ESA.

Will

Offline pagheca

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Not whining, cobber. No huhu.  Just saying that China is slow to share original data compared to NASA and ESA.

I think this is quite understandable. They are still building up experience, they are not a democracy, they have to learn how to manage public outreach.

Scientists there are subject to scrutiny from the politicians and a single error may have quite strong impact on careers and funding. They have to learn step by step what you can do and when. They have had pretty big failures in the past and they may be scared by the possibility of a sudden failure live or of a misleading information given to the public.

Actually I'm amazed by seeing this coverage for this mission. Respect to the past it looks to me quite an improvement. Derivative matters, not absolute value.

« Last Edit: 12/22/2013 12:29 AM by pagheca »

Offline OzWill

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Finally, I think we have two photos not taken from the projection screen.

 Source

« Last Edit: 12/22/2013 05:22 AM by OzWill »

Offline Lars_J

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Nice!

One Q springs to mind - is the rover able to operate independently, out of visual range from the lander?
« Last Edit: 12/22/2013 06:00 AM by Lars_J »

Offline OzWill

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Two more interesting photos:

The lander one was captioned 'the first hot-fire test of chang'e 3 lander'.

Source

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