Author Topic: LISA Gravitational wave mission selected for 2034  (Read 798 times)

Offline Celebrimbor

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I did a quick search for a thread on this - apologies if I missed it. 

ESA seem to be serious about making LISA a thing.  Super exciting!!

http://sci.esa.int/jump.cfm?oid=59243

Quote
Following selection, the mission design and costing can be completed. Then it will be proposed for 'adoption' before construction begins. Launch is expected in 2034.

So - why don't we use this thread to build up what we know?  I know nothing except I first came across this concept as part of a final year course in my MPhys back in 2005.  I'm sure the guy said something like "This is something that might happen in around 30 years time" - so well done there!

The idea is to use laser interferometry between 3 spacecraft that form a very large triangle in space - 2.5m km on one side.

By doing this, scientists will be able to measure the distance to ludicrously high accuracy.  High enough to measure ripples in spacetime caused by non-spherical rotating massive bodies - like neutron stars and black holes orbiting each other.

This follows on from the LISA Pathfinder mission which exceeded its performance goals.

So, is anyone here any more clued up about this?

Offline dmgaba

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This mission has, as noted, been going through early proposal stages (and the pullout of the US from participation) over many years.  Now that LIGO had "seen" gravitational waves and the highly successful Lisa Pathfinder technology demonstrator mission the European momentum is strong.  From the US side -- prior to the last election -- there seemed to be building momentum for having US participation again, but under the current circumstances who knows for sure.

There is considerable useful -- and pretty current (not counting the US politics) -- material about the LISA L3 Mission from the US Physics of the Cosmos NASA Committee.  See:  https://pcos.gsfc.nasa.gov/studies/L3/   for detailed summaries and also considerable technical information.
David G

Offline Star One

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LISA Gravitational wave mission selected for 2034
« Reply #2 on: 06/21/2017 09:43 PM »
I did a quick search for a thread on this - apologies if I missed it. 

ESA seem to be serious about making LISA a thing.  Super exciting!!

http://sci.esa.int/jump.cfm?oid=59243

Quote
Following selection, the mission design and costing can be completed. Then it will be proposed for 'adoption' before construction begins. Launch is expected in 2034.

So - why don't we use this thread to build up what we know?  I know nothing except I first came across this concept as part of a final year course in my MPhys back in 2005.  I'm sure the guy said something like "This is something that might happen in around 30 years time" - so well done there!

The idea is to use laser interferometry between 3 spacecraft that form a very large triangle in space - 2.5m km on one side.

By doing this, scientists will be able to measure the distance to ludicrously high accuracy.  High enough to measure ripples in spacetime caused by non-spherical rotating massive bodies - like neutron stars and black holes orbiting each other.

This follows on from the LISA Pathfinder mission which exceeded its performance goals.

So, is anyone here any more clued up about this?

See thread below.

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=23409

Also for a mission that will not launch 2034 it seems rather early to be starting its own thread.
« Last Edit: 06/21/2017 09:47 PM by Star One »

Online meekGee

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Re: LISA Gravitational wave mission selected for 2034
« Reply #3 on: 06/22/2017 06:39 AM »
Woohoo!

Many years ago, I was working on the US-version of LISA Pathfinder.  (which never flew, sadly)

Still a Sphere-over-cube supporter :)
ABCD - Always Be Counting Down

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