Author Topic: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates  (Read 8119 times)

Offline kevin-rf

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NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« on: 03/12/2013 05:12 PM »

LDCM Status Update for March 8, 2013


All satellite and instruments continue to perform normally. The Mission Operations team completed another round of Attitude Control System calibration maneuvers late last week. In addition, they tested the spacecraft's ability to execute uploaded commands while the satellite is out of range of ground stations, called stored command loads.

The Mission Operations team also conducted a series of data flow tests that exercised the entire image data transmission and processing functionality of the satellite and ground system using test patterns internally generated by the OLI and TIRS instruments. In these tests, the satellite successfully stored the instrument test pattern data in the onboard Solid State Recorder, and then transmitted that data to the ground when it flew back into range of the ground station. The Data Processing and Archive System (DPAS) at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, S.D., then successfully processed these test patterns as if they were Earth image data. These tests demonstrate the readiness of the entire LDCM satellite and ground system to successfully collect real Earth imagery.

The OLI and TIRS instruments continue to progress toward coming online. OLI had a successful checkout of its diffuser mechanism, which is part of OLI’s calibration system. The main activities this week, however, focused on TIRS. On March 4, the Mission Operations team successfully deployed the TIRS Earth shield from its launch position. The Earth shield is a large panel that blocks heat from Earth from getting onto the TIRS thermal radiators, thus increasing the efficiency of those radiators. Over the past few days the team has checked out the mid-stage heaters, powered up systems, including the Focal Plane Electronics Box, and tested the Scene Select Mirror. On March 6, the TIRS cryocooler was turned on and successfully cooled the sensors to 43 kelvins (-352 F).

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/index.html

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/mission-updates.html
« Last Edit: 03/12/2013 05:16 PM by kevin-rf »
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #1 on: 04/03/2013 01:16 AM »
April 1, 2013 landsat tweet

Quote
No Foolin' LDCM is performing perfectly & both instruments are nowcollecting 400 scenes/day!

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/index.html

Quote

LDCM Status Update for March 29, 2013


All spacecraft and instrument systems continue to perform normally. LDCM’s two instruments have been ramping up their Earth image collects, and on March 27, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) hit the 400 scenes per day mark. This is the data acquisition volume set forth in the specifications for LDCM and will be the operational acquisition standard.

Beginning on Friday, March 29, LDCM will under-fly Landsat 7, allowing the two satellites to collect coincident data that can be used for cross-calibration. The LDCM calibration team is evaluating data collected during this on-orbit check out period and adjustments will be made as necessary so that the LDCM data accurately reflects Earth’s radiance when operations are handed over to USGS and data are made available to the public in late May.

Other ongoing activities during the past week included the first OLI stellar calibration. This maneuver involved maneuvering the satellite so that it could view a designated star field so that the pointing accuracy of OLI could be evaluated. Additionally, tests of the X-band communication downlinks to six international ground stations occurred. International partners in Darwin, Australia; Alice Springs, Australia; Parepare, Indonesia; Kiruna, Sweden; Matera, Italy; and Neustrelitz, Germany, successfully downloaded test data.

The Mission Ops team also successfully performed a “blind” acquisition test using the Sioux Falls, S.D., ground station. This operation tested Mission Ops ability to communicate with the satellite in the event that no communication is scheduled, but that telemetry and commanding is necessary, triggering the need for the satellite transmitter to be turned on via ground command.
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Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #2 on: 04/04/2013 04:39 PM »
When's Landsat 5 going to be de-orbited so that this full replaces it, Spaceflight reported 5's orbit being lowered for this action but that was a little while back?

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #3 on: 04/16/2013 11:10 PM »
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/mission-updates.html
Quote
LDCM Status Update for April 16, 2013

All spacecraft and instrument systems continue to perform normally. Two ascent burns were performed in the last week. On Sunday, April 7, ascent burn No. 3 was conducted. The 56.2-second burn was the longest LDCM burn yet, bringing the satellite within range of its operational orbit. Early Friday morning, April 12, ascent burn No. 4 was performed. This 50.5-second burn delivered LDCM to its operational orbit altitude of 705 kilometers (438 miles). Additionally, an inclination burn was successfully executed on Sunday, Apr. 14, and a trim maneuver was not needed.

"After many years in the making, LDCM has reached her final home," said LDCM Project Manager Ken Schwer.

During this period, OLI and TIRS imaging have continued. The calibration team continues their trending work to refine the instruments' pre-launch calibration.

Quote
LDCM Status Update for April 5, 2013

All spacecraft and instrument systems continue to perform normally. LDCM under-flew the Landsat 7 satellite from Friday, Mar. 29, to Sunday, Mar. 31, collecting more than 1,200 coincident scenes. The scenes were acquired over a variety of different landscapes.

During this period two coordinated field campaigns also took place: one in Dolan Springs, Ariz., the other in California. The field campaigns were timed so that ground- and air-based measurements could be made simultaneously with tandem Landsat 7/ LDCM data collects. The NASA and USGS calibration teams are using the collected data to refine LDCM’s pre-launch calibration in preparation for the public release of data beginning in late May—after the on-orbit check-out is complete, the satellite reaches its operational altitude, and operations are formally handed over to USGS.
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #4 on: 04/22/2013 05:54 PM »
New Landsat image just released for Earth Day reveals a story of hot & cold at California's Salton Sea.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/news/salton-sea.html

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Offline Danderman

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #5 on: 04/22/2013 07:10 PM »
New Landsat image just released for Earth Day reveals a story of hot & cold at California's Salton Sea.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/news/salton-sea.html



As I happen to own a chunk of land in the image, it would be nice to know if there is a higher resolution version of the color image somewhere, and, more to the point, what is the heat image telling us?

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #6 on: 05/16/2013 07:41 PM »
NASA | "Come Fly With Landsat" director's cut

Published on May 16, 2013
The Landsat Data Continuity Mission offers a vicarious flight with a crisper view than our eyes alone would be capable of if we were in space. This animation, made from data collected on April 19, allows viewers to fly with the satellite in its final operating orbit. It comprises 56 Landsat scenes that have been stitched together into a seamless view from Russia to South Africa.

Orbiting at 16,800 mph (27,000 kph), LDCM made this flight in slightly more than 20 minutes. The animation moves faster, covering 5,665 miles (9,117 kilometers) in nearly 16 minutes. You would have to be moving about 21,930 mph (35,290 kph) to get a similar view — only slightly slower than the Apollo astronauts who entered Earth's orbit from the moon at 25,000 mph (40,200 kph).

A joint U.S. Geological Survey and NASA mission, LDCM launched on Feb. 11, 2013, and is still in its onboard calibration and checkout phase. The images shown here are considered test data. Once LDCM completes its check-out phase in late May, the satellite will be handed over to the USGS and renamed Landsat 8. After this point, the satellite will be considered operational and data will be available from USGS at no cost over the Internet.

HD of this and other LDCM Long Swath videos are located at this link:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a011200/a011249/

Lower resolution "entire video" version here on You Tube:


High Resolution "Highlights" video version here:
« Last Edit: 05/16/2013 08:02 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #7 on: 05/21/2013 05:24 PM »
LDCM Status Update for May 17, 2013

All spacecraft systems and instruments are performing normally. On Sunday, May 5, the Flight Dynamics Team fired thrusters for 0.8 seconds on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, or LDCM, Observatory to mitigate the risk of colliding with a piece of space junk. The burn also boosted the satellite as part of a planned atmospheric drag make-up maneuver. Afterward, the spacecraft safely returned to Earth-observing mode.

Through May 5, the satellite was routinely imaging more than 400 scenes per day, continuing routine calibrations and testing off-nadir (“nadir” means straight down) imaging. Additionally, real-time data was downlinked to international collaborator ground stations.

Then on Monday, May 6, the Operational Land Imager, or OLI, went into safe mode after a corruption event in unused memory. The cause was likely a result of a hit of higher than usual radiation from Earth’s inner Van Allen radiation belt over the South Atlantic Ocean. The anomaly was considered benign with no long-term effects on the mission. The OLI performed as designed by detecting the anomaly and placing itself in safe mode to protect the health of the instrument. On Friday, May 10, OLI was successfully returned to operation without incident.

On May 15, the team successfully completed the LDCM On-orbit Acceptance Review, which allows NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., to accept all contractual obligations for the spacecraft, the Operational Land Imager, and the Mission Operations Element from industry partners.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/landsat/main/mission-updates.html
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Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #8 on: 05/30/2013 08:31 PM »
May 30, 2013
 
RELEASE : 13-160
 
 
Landsat 8 Satellite Begins Watch
 
 
WASHINGTON -- NASA transferred operational control Thursday of the Landsat 8 satellite to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in a ceremony in Sioux Falls, S.D.

The event marks the beginning of the satellite's mission to extend an unparalleled four-decade record of monitoring Earth's landscape from space. Landsat 8 is the latest in the Landsat series of remote-sensing satellites, which have been providing global coverage of landscape changes on Earth since 1972. The Landsat program is a joint effort between NASA and USGS.

NASA launched the satellite Feb. 11 as the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). Since then, NASA mission engineers and scientists, with USGS collaboration, have been putting the satellite through its paces -- steering it into its orbit, calibrating the detectors, and collecting test images. Now fully mission-certified, the satellite is under USGS operational control.

"Landsat is a centerpiece of NASA's Earth Science program," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden in Washington. "Landsat 8 carries on a long tradition of Landsat satellites that for more than 40 years have helped us learn how Earth works, to understand how humans are affecting it and to make wiser decisions as stewards of this planet."

Beginning Thursday, USGS specialists will collect at least 400 Landsat 8 scenes every day from around the world to be processed and archived at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls. The newest satellite joins Landsat 7, which launched in 1999 and continues to collect images. Since 2008, USGS has provided more than 11 million current and historical Landsat images free of charge to users over the Internet.

"We are very pleased to work with NASA for the good of science and the American people," said U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in Washington. "The Landsat program allows us all to have a common, easily accessible view of our planet. This is the starting point for a shared understanding of the environmental challenges we face."

Remote-sensing satellites such as the Landsat series help scientists observe the world beyond the power of human sight, monitor changes to the land that may have natural or human causes, and detect critical trends in the conditions of natural resources.

The 41-year Landsat record provides global coverage at a scale that impartially documents natural processes such as volcanic eruptions, glacial retreat and forest fires and shows large-scale human activities such as expanding cities, crop irrigation and forest clear-cuts. The Landsat Program is a sustained effort by the United States to provide direct societal benefits across a wide range of human endeavors including human and environmental health, energy and water management, urban planning, disaster recovery, and agriculture.

With Landsat 8 circling Earth 14 times a day, and in combination with Landsat 7, researchers will be able to use an improved frequency of data from both satellites. The two observation instruments aboard Landsat 8 feature improvements over their earlier counterparts while collecting information that is compatible with 41 years of land images from previous Landsat satellites.

For more information about the Landsat mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/landsat


 
- end -
Tony De La Rosa

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #9 on: 06/25/2013 06:45 PM »
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #10 on: 02/14/2014 12:18 PM »
Emily Lakdawalla just tweeted that Landsat 8 has imaged  Landsat 5

http://landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/?p=7849

Cool or what?


Feb 14, 2014 • Eight months ago, on June 5, 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey decommissioned the venerable Landsat 5 satellite. That day, the USGS Landsat Flight Operations Team transmitted the last command to Landsat 5, effectively terminating the mission and leaving it in a disposal orbit.
This week, Landsat 8 overflew the defunct Landsat 5, and thanks to some clever work by Mike Gartley, a Research Scientist with the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing group at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)—a group that has long participated in Landsat calibration and validation—Landsat 5 was seen in an image taken by Landsat 8.

In these images, the satellite is seen as a streak of pixels (dark or light depending on the spectral band). There is one image from each of Landsat 8′s OLI bands, except for Band 7, or SWIR-2, where she blended into the clouds and was impossible to distinguish. In these images Landsat 5 is much closer to Landsat 8 than she is to the Earth.
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Offline Star One

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #11 on: 02/14/2014 03:55 PM »
How long is it estimated before Landsat 5 re-enters?

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #12 on: 07/11/2014 07:19 PM »
NASA | Landsat Looks to the Moon

Published on Jul 11, 2014
Every full moon, Landsat 8 turns its back on Earth. As the satellite's orbit takes it to the nighttime side of the planet, Landsat 8 pivots to point at the moon. It scans the distant lunar surface multiple times, then flips back around to continue its task of collecting land-cover information of the sunny side of Earth below. These monthly lunar scans are key to ensuring the land-imaging instrument aboard Landsat 8 is detecting light consistently. For a well-known and stable source of light, nothing on our planet beats the moon, which lacks an atmosphere and has an unchanging surface, barring the odd meteorite.

The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellite missions jointly managed by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. The first Landsat satellite launched in 1972 and Landsat 8 launched on February 11, 2013.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #13 on: 02/09/2018 01:15 AM »
bump...

Landsat 8 Completes 5 Years of Operation


USGS
Published on Feb 8, 2018

USGS Scientists John Dwyer and Tom Loveland from EROS discuss the major accomplishments of Landsat 8 as it reaches it's 5 year design life. The Landsat program started in 1972, and has a bright future thanks to these extraordinary satellites.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2R8nPHdKYA?t=001

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Offline catdlr

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Re: NASA - Landsat 8 (LDCM) updates
« Reply #14 on: 02/09/2018 01:17 AM »
Landsat 8: 5-Year Anniversary

USGS
Published on Feb 8, 2018


February 11 will mark the 5th anniversary of the launch of Landsat 8!

Since 2013, over 1.1 million scenes have been acquired, adding to the Landsat archive which started almost 45 years ago, and continues to help support studies in agriculture, forest and water quality/use/management, natural disasters, and land change.

The Landsat Program is a series of Earth-observing satellites co-managed by USGS and NASA, and offers the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites orbit Earth and provide essential information to help land managers and policymakers make informed decisions about our natural resources and environment. All Landsat data are distributed by the USGS at no charge from EarthExplorer, GloVis, and the LandsatLook Viewer. To learn more about the Landsat Program please visit https://landsat.usgs.gov/ or follow us on Twitter @USGSLandsat or Facebook @NASA.Landsat.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4Mb47DO5SE?t=001

Tony De La Rosa