Author Topic: Orbital's Antares/Cygnus ORB-1 (CRS-1) Pre-Launch Update and Discussion Thread  (Read 75216 times)

Offline Prober

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What is the significance of the icon near the West Coast on that patch? It looks similar to the Commercial Crew logo.

Maybe in honor of the spacecraft's namesake? The late C Gordon Fullerton worked at Dryden.

a very nice write up on it  http://news.yahoo.com/orbital-sciences-names-next-private-space-station-freighter-133324221.html
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Offline collectSPACE

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a very nice write up on it

Thanks! Here's the original article: Orbital names next space station freighter for late pilot-astronaut

NASA Dryden, where Fullerton flew as a research pilot, picked up the cS article as well.

And yes, the symbol on the Orb-1 mission insignia is the Astronaut Pin, a nod to Spaceship C. Gordon Fullerton.
« Last Edit: 12/10/2013 03:03 PM by collectSPACE »

Offline Salo

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http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml

December 11, 2013

Overnight, our operations team mated the Cygnus spacecraft to the Antares rocket that will launch it to the International Space Station (see photo below). Later today they will conduct "Flight Sim 2" which will simulate the complete launch sequence to ensure that the integrated Antares and Cygnus systems perform as designed. Post-test data analysis will follow immediately and will likely continue into tomorrow.
Next up is adding so called "late load" cargo into Cygnus which includes, among others: 33 cubesats that will be deployed from the space station at a later date; student experiments studying such areas as enzyme activity in microgravity, DNA mutation rate, cell regeneration and oil bubble formation; and even an experiment comparing differences in group behavior of ants living in microgravity conditions versus those living on Earth. Cameras will record the ants living on the space station and software will analyze their movement patterns and interaction rates. Students in K-12 will be able to observe the space station ants in near-real-time and conduct their own classroom experiments.

Cygnus mated to Antares Dec. 10, 2013

Offline jacqmans

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MEDIA ADVISORY M13-193


NASA Television Coverage Set for Cygnus Launch to International Space Station

NASA Television will provide coverage of the upcoming Orbital Sciencesí Cygnus cargo spacecraft mission to resupply the International Space Station this month.

On the heels of a successful demonstration flight to the space station in September, Orbital Sciences is scheduled to launch a Cygnus capsule on an Antares rocket at 9:42 p.m. EST Wednesday, Dec. 18, from Launch Pad 0A at Wallops Flight Facility, Va.

Launch coverage on NASA TV will begin at 9:15 p.m. NASA TV will air a comprehensive video feed of launch preparations and other footage related to the mission beginning at 6:45 p.m.

On Tuesday, Dec. 17, briefings previewing the mission's science and a prelaunch status from Wallops will be broadcast on NASA TV at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., respectively. The briefings will be replayed at Dec. 18 at 7 p.m., leading up to live coverage of the launch.

The cargo craft will be filled with 2,780 pounds of supplies for the station, including vital science experiments to expand the research capability of the Expedition 38 crew members aboard the orbiting laboratory, crew provisions, spare parts and experiment hardware. Also aboard the flight are 23 student experiments that will involve more than 10,000 students on the ground. These experiments will involve life sciences topics ranging from amoeba reproduction to calcium in the bones to salamanders.

This and future Cygnus flights will ensure a robust national capability to deliver critical science research to orbit, significantly increasing NASA's ability to conduct new science investigations to the only laboratory in microgravity.

If Cygnus launches Dec. 18, the spacecraft will arrive at the space station on Saturday, Dec. 21. Astronauts Michael Hopkins of NASA and Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency will be standing by to capture the capsule with the stationís robotic arm and install it on the Earth-facing port of the station's Harmony module.

NASA TV coverage of capture and installation will begin at 3:45 a.m.  Dec. 21. Grapple is scheduled at 4:38 a.m. Coverage of the installation of Cygnus onto Harmony will begin at 5:45 a.m.

For NASA TV streaming video, downlink and scheduling information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For video b-roll and media resources on the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/stationnews

Offline arachnitect

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http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml

 even an experiment comparing differences in group behavior of ants living in microgravity conditions versus those living on Earth. Cameras will record the ants living on the space station and software will analyze their movement patterns and interaction rates.

Sounds like the ISS is getting an ant farm for Christmas.

(party thread wanted)

Offline edkyle99

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Reuters reported today that "U.S. lawmakers are considering legislation to deny visas to Ukrainian officials or freeze their U.S. assets if there is an escalation of violence against anti-government demonstrators".  This seems to have begun with Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovich's decision to "scrap a trade deal with the European Union and steer Ukraine closer to Russia", according to the report. 

I'm not sure that this would have any affect on Antares, but it might become an issue down the road.  The U.S. doesn't seem to be talking about trade restrictions here.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/11/2013 10:32 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline Lurker Steve

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http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml

 even an experiment comparing differences in group behavior of ants living in microgravity conditions versus those living on Earth. Cameras will record the ants living on the space station and software will analyze their movement patterns and interaction rates.

Sounds like the ISS is getting an ant farm for Christmas.

(party thread wanted)

Let's hope that the next SpaceX CRS flight gets the same coverage. Where's the Orbital news love ??

Online Alpha Control

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I saw on Orbital's viewing maps for the launch the CRS Orb-1 launch patch I think they did a good job I like the 8 stars on top. Look forward to a standalone image, I don't know enough about photoshop programs to pull it off.

Done.  ;)

Nicely done, GP SST!  I have the ORB-D sticker on my car's rear bumper.
Do you know what the significance of the 8 stars is in the image?
Thanks
Space launches attended:
Antares/Cygnus ORB-D1 Wallops Island, VA Sept 2013 | STS-123 KSC, FL March 2008 | SpaceShipOne Mojave, CA June 2004

Offline collectSPACE

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Do you know what the significance of the 8 stars is in the image?

Orbital Sciences is contracted by NASA to fly eight Cygnus missions to the space station ó Orb-1 being the first (hence the first star being red).

Online Jakusb

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Do you know what the significance of the 8 stars is in the image?

Orbital Sciences is contracted by NASA to fly eight Cygnus missions to the space station ó Orb-1 being the first (hence the first star being red).
I truly hope every launch goes well, but... What if one fails? A cross instead of a star? ;)
Sounds a bit tricky to put 8 stars like that. Or call it bad voodoo for those superstitious.
But as said, hopefully the al become red by success. :)

Offline Lurker Steve

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Do you know what the significance of the 8 stars is in the image?

Orbital Sciences is contracted by NASA to fly eight Cygnus missions to the space station ó Orb-1 being the first (hence the first star being red).
I truly hope every launch goes well, but... What if one fails? A cross instead of a star? ;)
Sounds a bit tricky to put 8 stars like that. Or call it bad voodoo for those superstitious.
But as said, hopefully the al become red by success. :)

Maybe only the current mission will be red ??

Offline edkyle99

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Do you know what the significance of the 8 stars is in the image?

Orbital Sciences is contracted by NASA to fly eight Cygnus missions to the space station ó Orb-1 being the first (hence the first star being red).
I truly hope every launch goes well, but... What if one fails? A cross instead of a star? ;)
Sounds a bit tricky to put 8 stars like that. Or call it bad voodoo for those superstitious.
But as said, hopefully the al become red by success. :)
Color the stars as mission success are achieved.  Ignore the failures, if any.  That's how McDonnell Douglas and Goddard did it for Delta for many years.  The Delta logo used to sport success stars that added up to whatever the record number of consecutive successes were for the rocket.  ULA stopped the practice, maybe to save money.  I'm happy to see Orbital picking up the general idea again, and running with it.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/13/2013 03:38 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline Lurker Steve

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Ignore the failures, if any. 

 - Ed Kyle

Did Ed really say that ??

The same guy that keeps track of every rocket hiccup that ever happened ?

Offline rtphokie

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NOTAM for Dec 18 launch
« Reply #53 on: 12/13/2013 05:20 PM »
NATAMS (Notice to Mariners in this case) have just been issued by NASA Wallops' PAO.  Always interesting to see where the stages are expected to splash down.

Offline psloss

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Update from Orbital:
http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml

Quote
December 13, 2013

We are awaiting word from NASA about how the coolant issue on the space station may affect this mission. We currently plan to load the final cargo onto Cygnus tomorrow (December 14). If we get the go-ahead from NASA to do so, we will continue to target December 18 for launch and a December 21 rendezvous and berthing with the station. If cargo is loaded on Sunday the 15th, the first available launch attempt would be on the 19th, leading to a December 22 rendezvous and berthing with the station. At the latest, NASA is expected to provide direction on Monday the 16th as to how the ISS issue will affect our launch and rendezvous schedule.

In the meantime, the mission team plans to continue to add "late load" cargo into Cygnus today, perform tests and prepare for close-outs to the rocket over the weekend if the final cargo is loaded.

Offline edkyle99

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Ignore the failures, if any. 

 - Ed Kyle

Did Ed really say that ??

For this particular purpose, yes.

 - Ed Kyle

Offline jacqmans

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Launch Viewing Maps


Weather permitting, the launch of Antares from Wallops Island, VA on December 18, 2013 will be widely visible along the East Coast.


http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/LaunchViewingMaps/index.shtml

Offline psloss

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Sounds like a slip to NET Thursday night based on deferring final cargo for at least a day (and closing hatch, buttoning up Cygnus, etc.):
http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml

Quote
December 14, 2013

At NASA's direction, Orbital's Cygnus operations team deferred loading the mission's final cargo into the spacecraft earlier today, postponing that operation by a day. Orbital will await NASA's direction for the final cargo load tomorrow while the cooling loop issue aboard the ISS is being investigated. If we get the go-ahead to load the final, time sensitive cargo on Sunday, roll out to the launch pad would be on Tuesday, December 17, launch on December 19, and rendezvous and berthing with the ISS on December 22. Please check back for additional updates over the next several days.
« Last Edit: 12/14/2013 03:38 PM by psloss »

Offline psloss

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Orbital's companion Tweet to earlier update:
https://twitter.com/OrbitalSciences/status/411910745949888512

Quote
#Antares launch of #Cygnus for CRS #Orb1 mission for @NASA is no earlier than Dec. 19. Launch time 9:19 p.m. (EST) http://www.orbital.com/NewsInfo/MissionUpdates/Orb-1/MissionUpdate/index.shtml Ö
« Last Edit: 12/14/2013 04:56 PM by psloss »

Offline psloss

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And I got this from NASA Wallops PAO...I suspect there will be a web link to this soon somewhere on the NASA.gov portal:

Quote from: NASA
NASA and Orbital Sciences Corp. Saturday moved the targeted launch date of the Orbital-1 resupply mission to the International Space Station to no earlier than Thursday, Dec. 19 to enable engineers to continue their analysis of data involving a suspect Flow Control Valve in a pump module on the starboard truss of the station that malfunctioned on Wednesday. Orbitalís Antares rocket and the Cygnus commercial cargo vehicle are now scheduled to launch from Pad 0A at the Wallops Flight Facility, Va. no earlier than Dec. 19 at 9:19 p.m. EST. NASA TV coverage of launch will begin at 8:45 p.m. EST.

The delay will allow Orbitalís engineering team to load late scientific cargo into the Cygnus craft on Sunday to protect several days of launch opportunities through the end of next week. Under current planning, the Antares rocket with Cygnus would rollout to the launch pad at Wallops in the early morning hours on Tuesday, Dec. 17. A launch on Dec. 19 would result in Cygnus arriving at the space station for a grapple and berthing to the Earth-facing port of the Harmony module on Sunday, Dec. 22.

The launch is still dependent on NASA engineers resolving a problem with the stationís pump module flow control valve that experienced a problem Wednesday in properly positioning itself so that ammonia coolant can flow properly through the cooling lines of the stationís truss while keeping heat-rejecting equipment at the correct temperature.

Overnight, engineers conducted testing with a component in the Pump Module called a Radiator Return Valve, which is a ball valve that operates in concert with the suspect Flow Control Valve in the pump to control heating in the cooling lines to the Interface Heat Exchangers. The Radiator Return Valve was commanded to various positions to see how the Flow Control Valve might be placed in a fixed position to help actively control cooling loop A, and in turn, allow the system to warm up sufficiently so that the heat exchangers in the loop can operate at a proper temperature. Engineers continue to pore over the data and other techniques to manage the flow control valve. The cooling of station systems is currently being managed through cooling loop B that employs a pump module on the port truss.

In the meantime, Expedition 38 crewmembers Rick Mastracchio and Michael Hopkins worked Saturday in the Quest airlock to begin preparing their spacesuits in the event they are called upon to conduct spacewalks to change out the faulty pump module. If managers direct the crewmembers to perform those spacewalks beginning late next week, the launch of the Orbital-1 mission would be delayed until January.

Edit: weblink is http://www.nasa.gov/content/cygnus-launch-slips-to-dec-19/
« Last Edit: 12/14/2013 06:56 PM by psloss »

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