Author Topic: LIVE: SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 - CASSIOPE - Sept. 29 - LAUNCH UPDATES  (Read 237775 times)

Offline Lars_J

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Using the latest TLEs for the 20 objects now in the catalog (A to T):
- perigee altitudes range from 235 km (F) to 444 km (M)
- apogee altitudes range from 1350 km (A) to 1590 km (S)
- inclinations range from 80.961° (A) to 81.035° (K)

So that's confirmation that it disintegrated?

Does that count of 20 include CASSIOPE and the secondary payloads, or does it exclude it?
« Last Edit: 09/30/2013 07:06 AM by Lars_J »

Offline input~2

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Does that count of 20 include CASSIOPE and the secondary payloads, or does it exclude it?
I assume they are included in this count
« Last Edit: 09/30/2013 07:19 PM by input~2 »

Offline ugordan

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It's worth posting this video taken from the ground, as it shows the first stage firing in puffs shortly after stage separation - our first look at the first stage deceleration burns! (from 4:00 onwards)

It's also the first video to clearly show the fairing vent covers popping off at 1:37.

Those puffs are not deceleration burns, probably GOX venting and/or stage ACS firing.

Offline mlindner

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Using the latest TLEs for the 20 objects now in the catalog (A to T):
- perigee altitudes range from 235 km (F) to 444 km (M)
- apogee altitudes range from 1350 km (A) to 1590 km (S)
- inclinations range from 80.961° (A) to 81.035° (K)

So that's confirmation that it disintegrated?

20 objects is much too few for a stage breakup event. 6 nanosats, upper stage, and CASSIOPE takes care of 8 objects.

Edit: Another object appeared, so thats now 21. This is getting odd.
Edit2: NVM, appears to be related to ASTRA 2E.
« Last Edit: 09/30/2013 08:15 AM by mlindner »
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Offline gwiz

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Thanks. I didn't know about the DANDE adapter (is there a paper or something that describes this?)
This is where I found it:
http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/about-dande/mission

Offline jacqmans

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Successful Launch of CASSIOPE: Hybrid Satellite Mission

Carrying Science and Telecommunications Payloads

Longueuil, Quebec, September 29, 2013 — The Canadian Space Agency is proud to announce that Canadian satellite, Cascade Smallsat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer (CASSIOPE) was successfully launched today at noon (12:00 p.m. EDT). Lift off took place from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

CASSIOPE is the first Canadian hybrid satellite to carry a dual mission in the fields of telecommunications and scientific research.  The main objectives are to gather information to better understand the science of space weather, while verifying high-speed communications concepts through the use of advanced space technologies.

The Honourable James Moore, Minister of Industry and Minister responsible for the Canadian Space Agency, commented on this first launch under his tenure. “This is a moment of pride for all Canadians. With the CASSIOPE mission, the Government reaffirms its commitment to support Canada’s space industry while using space technologies to advance knowledge in areas of critical scientific inquiry,” said Minister James Moore.

“The Canadian Space Agency is proud to contribute to the CASSIOPE mission,” said newly appointed President of the Canadian Space Agency Walter Natynczyk.  It enables the integration of the Government’s research and development agenda while partnering with Canadian space industry and university science sectors”.

MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates Ltd. led a Canadian industrial team that included Magellan Aerospace of Winnipeg Manitoba, COM DEV International of Cambridge, Ontario and the University of Calgary, Alberta in the development of the CASSIOPE mission.  The small satellite mission was enabled through contributions from the Canadian Space Agency and Industry Canada’s Technology Partnerships Canada. 

For more information on CASSIOPE, visit:

http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/satellites/cassiope.asp

Offline Lars_J

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A short but neat video from far away showing the lift-off speed:

Offline jcm

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Using the latest TLEs for the 20 objects now in the catalog (A to T):
- perigee altitudes range from 235 km (F) to 444 km (M)
- apogee altitudes range from 1350 km (A) to 1590 km (S)
- inclinations range from 80.961° (A) to 81.035° (K)

So that's confirmation that it disintegrated?

20 objects is much too few for a stage breakup event. 6 nanosats, upper stage, and CASSIOPE takes care of 8 objects.

Edit: Another object appeared, so thats now 21. This is getting odd.
Edit2: NVM, appears to be related to ASTRA 2E.

20 objects - or even 10, given the known 10 payload + operational parts - is not too few for this long
after a breakup event. In the cases where hundreds of debris objects were generated, most of them were not cataloged until weeks or months later. So the data are *not inconsistent* with a breakup at this stage, but there are also other
explanations (including milder energetic events resulting in release of insulation, ice, etc. - or even software
errors in the radar tracking creating spurious objects, rare nowadays but with SpaceFence gone something could be squirrely?) - without decay rates and RCS info it's a little early to conclude anything, and since SpX say they didn't have a breakup I'm inclined to look for another
explanation for the time being, while waiting for data to accumulate.
« Last Edit: 09/30/2013 09:46 PM by jcm »
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline justineet

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Using the latest TLEs for the 20 objects now in the catalog (A to T):
- perigee altitudes range from 235 km (F) to 444 km (M)
- apogee altitudes range from 1350 km (A) to 1590 km (S)
- inclinations range from 80.961° (A) to 81.035° (K)

So that's confirmation that it disintegrated?


It's usually preferable to get another count at a later time when there is re-ignition failure.  First counts in such cases have a tendency of counting reflections of unburned puffs of fuel clouds as inanimate objects. Later on those disappear.
« Last Edit: 09/30/2013 11:09 PM by justineet »

Offline yg1968

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Here is the full webcast of the launch:


Online notsorandom

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There was a sighting of the upper stage over southern Africa. Not sure if this adds any evidence for or against the hypothesis that there might have been an energetic breakup but it is still pretty cool. It reminds me of the sighting over Australia of a previous Falcon upper stage. http://www.nbcnews.com/science/ufo-over-indian-ocean-spacex-falcon-9-rocket-sparks-sightings-4B11297922

Offline mlindner

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There was a sighting of the upper stage over southern Africa. Not sure if this adds any evidence for or against the hypothesis that there might have been an energetic breakup but it is still pretty cool. It reminds me of the sighting over Australia of a previous Falcon upper stage. http://www.nbcnews.com/science/ufo-over-indian-ocean-spacex-falcon-9-rocket-sparks-sightings-4B11297922

Elon already tweeted about it several hours ago.

Quote
Elon Musk
@DebbieViviers @SpaceX Yes, upper stage venting of liquid oxygen created a fast moving fuzzy white sphere in space over SA
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Offline sanman

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I'm of the mind that those mystery puffs we are seeing in that video are not first stage related, but are rapidly expanding gas from the exhaust of the MVac on the second stage. Based on when the call over countdown net referenced the relight of the first stage engines, that happened much later than this.

So from 4:16 - 4:29 that haloed shape is an initial exhaust cloud emitted from the 2nd stage engine?

Offline sanman

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Here's another nifty vid that's not quite as zoomed in:



You can maybe barely make out the first stage ACS firing activity a bit after 2:50

Offline sanman

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And another one - similar time sync:


Offline fatjohn1408

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And one of the passengers, DANDE, has TLE's and has seen spacecraft beacons.

http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/boulderstudents/boulderprojects/dande

DANDE
1 99999U 00000U    13272.68162153  .00000351  00000-0  12139-4 0 00004
2 99999 080.9969 315.2113 0796928 158.5047 042.9913 13.96429132000014
I get a 328 x 1493 km x 80.97 deg orbit, close to the planned 324 x 1,500 km x 80 deg.  The biggest divergence is inclination.

 - Ed Kyle

How do you do this actually? Is there a quick and dirty calculation that can be performed?

Online kevin-rf

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How do you do this actually? Is there a quick and dirty calculation that can be performed?

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/SSapplications/Post/JavaSSOP/SSOP_Help/tle_def.html

btw. Space-Track TLE's are not supposed to be posted. Though, posting the catalog number and what Ed posted are fair game.
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Offline Skyrocket

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And one of the passengers, DANDE, has TLE's and has seen spacecraft beacons.

http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/boulderstudents/boulderprojects/dande

DANDE
1 99999U 00000U    13272.68162153  .00000351  00000-0  12139-4 0 00004
2 99999 080.9969 315.2113 0796928 158.5047 042.9913 13.96429132000014
I get a 328 x 1493 km x 80.97 deg orbit, close to the planned 324 x 1,500 km x 80 deg.  The biggest divergence is inclination.

 - Ed Kyle

How do you do this actually? Is there a quick and dirty calculation that can be performed?

For quick and dirty see here: http://www.satobs.org/seesat/Dec-2002/0197.html

Offline JimO

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May I raise the point that the videos from South Africa and Mauritius show a symmetric expanding cloud, what might be expected from a stable dispenser. This is markedly unlike the spiral clouds painted by
tumbling stages. Is that a clue that no energetic event disturbed the orientation of the second stage?

Online kevin-rf

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Jim, I thought the spiral patterns where due to a stage firing while tumbling...
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