Author Topic: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over  (Read 1761 times)

Offline Star One

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First time I've seen a definitive date for this. Wonder if they'll actual achieve this target?

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Andrey Kalinovskiy, general director of Proton manufacturer Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, based in Moscow, said the Angara family of rockets, now in testing, will become operational in 2021 and fully replace Proton by 2025.

http://spacenews.com/russia-aims-to-retire-proton-in-2025-as-angara-takes-over/

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #1 on: 03/18/2015 06:15 PM »
First time I've seen a definitive date for this. Wonder if they'll actual achieve this target?

Quote
Andrey Kalinovskiy, general director of Proton manufacturer Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, based in Moscow, said the Angara family of rockets, now in testing, will become operational in 2021 and fully replace Proton by 2025.

http://spacenews.com/russia-aims-to-retire-proton-in-2025-as-angara-takes-over/
current lease bans hypergolic launchers after 31 December 2024. Negiotiations and a new agreement would be needed for an extension and that would be a costly deal given Kazakh pushed rate increases and other tactics after every last failure and some military flights.

Offline notsorandom

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #2 on: 03/18/2015 07:12 PM »
There has been rumor that the Angara is more expensive than the Proton. If so is it significantly so? Also my understanding is that the three core version is not being developed in favor of continuing the Soyuz. Replacing at least some of the Soyuz launches would give the Angara system a higher launch rate and may give better economies.

Offline Star One

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #3 on: 03/18/2015 07:18 PM »

First time I've seen a definitive date for this. Wonder if they'll actual achieve this target?

Quote
Andrey Kalinovskiy, general director of Proton manufacturer Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, based in Moscow, said the Angara family of rockets, now in testing, will become operational in 2021 and fully replace Proton by 2025.

http://spacenews.com/russia-aims-to-retire-proton-in-2025-as-angara-takes-over/
current lease bans hypergolic launchers after 31 December 2024. Negiotiations and a new agreement would be needed for an extension and that would be a costly deal given Kazakh pushed rate increases and other tactics after every last failure and some military flights.

So they basically don't have an option on that date, the change has to be made by then.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #4 on: 03/18/2015 08:03 PM »

First time I've seen a definitive date for this. Wonder if they'll actual achieve this target?

Quote
Andrey Kalinovskiy, general director of Proton manufacturer Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, based in Moscow, said the Angara family of rockets, now in testing, will become operational in 2021 and fully replace Proton by 2025.

http://spacenews.com/russia-aims-to-retire-proton-in-2025-as-angara-takes-over/
current lease bans hypergolic launchers after 31 December 2024. Negiotiations and a new agreement would be needed for an extension and that would be a costly deal given Kazakh pushed rate increases and other tactics after every last failure and some military flights.

So they basically don't have an option on that date, the change has to be made by then.
that is my deep understanding since the last agreement on the Baikonur Russian sovereignty extension at the end of 2009 plus all of the yearly to quarterly amendments in recent years that are pushing to accelerate the handover. Kazakhs passed some laws banning toxic rocketry (hypergolic and some solid propulsion) in their nation so if Baikonurs sovereignty agreement concluded without an extension only launchers like Zenit, Soyuz, Energia and modern Russian SRMs could fly.

Offline fregate

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #5 on: 03/18/2015 11:48 PM »
There has been rumor that the Angara is more expensive than the Proton. If so is it significantly so? Also my understanding is that the three core version is not being developed in favor of continuing the Soyuz. Replacing at least some of the Soyuz launches would give the Angara system a higher launch rate and may give better economies.
It's not a rumor - it's a fact! At the moment it's impossible to compare certified Proton (400+ launches) and un-certified Angara 5 (maiden launch so far) but we'll see some numbers in ROSKOSMOS state corporation tenders for federal payloads. Price for commercial payloads it's a different kettle of fish! 
"Selene, the Moon. Selenginsk, an old town in Siberia: moon-rocket  town" Vladimir Nabokov

Offline woods170

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Re: Russia Aims To Retire Proton in 2025 as Angara Takes Over
« Reply #6 on: 03/19/2015 08:10 AM »

First time I've seen a definitive date for this. Wonder if they'll actual achieve this target?

Quote
Andrey Kalinovskiy, general director of Proton manufacturer Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center, based in Moscow, said the Angara family of rockets, now in testing, will become operational in 2021 and fully replace Proton by 2025.

http://spacenews.com/russia-aims-to-retire-proton-in-2025-as-angara-takes-over/
current lease bans hypergolic launchers after 31 December 2024. Negiotiations and a new agreement would be needed for an extension and that would be a costly deal given Kazakh pushed rate increases and other tactics after every last failure and some military flights.

So they basically don't have an option on that date, the change has to be made by then.
Unless Putin goes nuts again and assimilates Kazakhstan into Russia. Oh wait... let's not go there...

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