Author Topic: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 11, 2014)  (Read 40900 times)

Offline Artyom.

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Noctilucent clouds as seen from ISS

... and Venus  :) .

Photo by Sergei Ryazansky.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline Jester

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #136 on: 01/17/2014 03:45 PM »
Ah, thats what it was, I'll post in hi-res on L2 soon.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #137 on: 01/17/2014 07:32 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/16/14

Posted on January 16, 2014 by HQ.

USOS Food Warmer Status: Today the USOS Food Warmer within LAB Express Rack 6, Drawer 8 experienced an over current and tripped the associated Remote Power Controller (RPC). The crew has been instructed not to use the food warmer until ground teams can troubleshoot.
 
ISS Reboost: The reboost that was planned at 7:54 pm CST last night was cancelled due to possible post-reboost conjunction.  The reboost has been replanned for January 17th at 6:09pm CST.
 
NightPod Investigation:  Flight Engineer (FE)-6 Wakata installed ESA’s NightPod in the Cupola and then performed a checkout after a new software load.  NightPod photographs will be taken while the ISS trajectory passes over Mexico, the Eastern United States and Europe. Wakata then stowed NightPod and copied all of the pictures to a Station Support Computer (SSC) for downlink.  NightPod includes tracking device technology being tested on the ISS for its ability to assist cameras in taking improved photographs of the Earth, especially at night (in low light conditions). The device compensates for ISS movement allowing a camera fitted to the device a longer exposure time on fixed targets on Earth. This is helpful for taking images of Earth for education, promotion or research activities and holds the potential for use on orbital craft on future missions around other planets and planetary bodies.
 
Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Kinetics Platform (BCAT-KP) Experiment:  FE-3 Hopkins installed and performed a checkout of the BCAT-KP hardware.  Hopkins has setup and homogenizing the first of five Harvard samples, the start of a 14 day sample run. He also photographed the sample and the other nine that are not being activated yet.  BCAT-KP provides a platform for material and industrial scientists to investigate colloid phase changes, providing results that may be used to develop new colloidal materials and formulations with unique properties.  The results may support new applications, from new liquid crystals to consumer goods having longer shelf life and uses.
 
NanoRacks Microscope Operation with Module-38:  Wakata used Microscope-2 to perform microscopic analysis of the NanoRacks Module-38 Petri dishes.  These Module-38 experiments are designed by students as part of a competition sponsored by the International Space School Educational Trust (ISSET).  This particular experiment examines three-dimensional growth of slime mold in petri dishes utilizing the NanoRacks Microscopes Facility.
 
Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics Test:  FE-5 Mastracchio and Commander Kotov performed a dry run of the Zero Robotics tests in preparation for the final compatition scheduled for Friday January 17th.  SPHERES Zero Robotics provides high school students with the opportunity to act as ground controllers for research in space.  As part of the competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are then tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.
 
Vaccine-21 Group Activation Packs (GAPs) Experiment Conclusion:  Mastracchio accessed the Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus-2 (CGBA-2), removed the active Vaccine-21 GAPs and placed them in the Minus Eighty Degree Celsius Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI).  This experiment, also referred to as Antibiotic Effectiveness in Space-1 (AES-1), tests the hypothesis that antibiotics used to treat bacterial grown in space will exhibit reduced efficacy and will be associated with specific changes in bacterial gene expression that correlate with cell survival.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #138 on: 01/18/2014 02:48 AM »
Today's ISS orbit's reboost was postponed to January 18 due to possible collision with 10257/1977-065CJ.
The reboost was done today.
http://www.interfax.ru/world/news/352297

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #139 on: 01/21/2014 06:16 PM »
Expedition 38 - In-Flight Event with Wakata for the JAXA - January 21
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8678

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #140 on: 01/21/2014 07:33 PM »

January 21, 2014

MEDIA ADVISORY M14-015

Texas High School Students to Talk Live with Space Station Crew Members

Students at Alamo Heights High School in San Antonio and their congressional representative will speak with Expedition 38 crew members aboard the International Space Station at 10:25 a.m. CST Thursday, Jan. 23.

Media are invited to attend and cover the 20-minute Earth-to-space call, which also will be broadcast on NASA Television and the agency's website.

Students will ask NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio questions about life, work and research aboard the space station. Rep. Lamar Smith of Texas, chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, will open the downlink with a voice check call up to the station.

Media interested in covering the event must contact Colin Lang at 210-820-8850 or clang@ahisd.net. Alamo Heights High School is located at 6900 Broadway in San Antonio.

The students participating in the downlink are involved in SystemsGo, a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) initiative developed to promote engineering studies through research. SystemsGo helps students to develop work force skills and encourage them to study subjects that lead to careers in the engineering industries. The school has incorporated NASA activities into classes in preparation for the conversation. Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides them with an authentic, live experience of space exploration, space study and the scientific components of space travel and possibilities of life in space.

This in-flight education downlink is one in a series with educational organizations in the United States to improve STEM teaching and learning. It is an integral component of NASA's Teaching From Space education program, which promotes learning opportunities and builds partnerships with the education community using the unique environment of space and NASA's human spaceflight program.

To keep up with Hopkins' research and life on the station through Twitter, follow:

http://www.twitter.com/AstroIllini

To follow Twitter updates from Mastracchio, visit:

http://www.twitter.com/AstroRM

The exact time of the downlink could change. For NASA TV streaming video, schedule and downlink information, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For information about NASA's education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

For information about the International Space Station, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/station

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #141 on: 01/21/2014 07:41 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/20/14

Posted on January 20, 2014 by HQ.
 

Ocular Health (OH) Vision Test:  With assistance from ground medical support personnel, Flight Engineer (FE)-3 Hopkins completed a vision test today as part of his Flight Day 120 Ocular Health session that will be completed over multiple days.  This was the first use of the new Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) laptop that arrived on Orb-1 and installed last Friday, January 17th. No issues were reported.  The Ocular Health protocol calls for a systematic gathering of physiological data to characterize the risk of microgravity-induced visual impairment/intracranial pressure in ISS crewmembers.  Researchers believe that the measurement of visual, vascular and central nervous system changes over the course of this experiment and during the subsequent post flight recovery will assist in the development of countermeasures, clinical monitoring strategies and clinical practice guidelines.

NanoRacks Microscope Operation with Module-38:  FE-6 Wakata continued with microscopic analysis of the NanoRacks Module-38 Petri dishes.  These Module-38 experiments are designed by students as part of a competition sponsored by the International Space School Educational Trust (ISSET).  This particular experiment examines three-dimensional growth of slime mold in Petri dishes utilizing the NanoRacks Microscopes Facility.

NanoRacks Platform-1 Hardware Upgrade:  Hopkins installed and activated NanoRacks Platform-1 with Module-39.  The Multi-Gas Monitor uses laser sensors to continuously measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and humidity in spacecraft cabin air in real time. The multiple low power, tunable lasers train an infrared laser beam on an air sample, and sensors tuned to specific wavelengths of light detect which gases are present. The instrument fits in a device the size of a shoebox and detects the presence of various gases in less than one second.

ENERGY (Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight):  Today Hopkins set up and positioned an Armband monitor on his right triceps, where it will be worn for the next 10 days while he is executing the ENERGY diet protocol.   A loss in astronauts’ body mass is a common observation during space flight. ENERGY measures change in energy balance in crewmembers following long term space flight.  It also measures adaptations in the components of total energy expenditure of crewmembers, so that an equation to determine the energy requirements of crewmembers during space flight may be derived. Such knowledge is of great importance to ensure optimal crew health and performance, overall mission success, and to ensure adequate exercise load and cargo allotments for food are provided while the crew is on-orbit.

Device for the study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization (DECLIC) Investigation:  Wakata removed the High Temperature Insert (HTI) from the DECLIC Experiment Locker (EXL) and then installed and activated the ALICE-LIKE Insert (ALI) in the EXL. A DECLIC ALI 18-day run.  The flow of heat during boiling events is different in microgravity than it is on Earth.  DECLIC ALI results will help scientists understand how heat flows in fluids at the verge of boiling will help scientists develop cooling systems for use in microgravity.

JEM Thermal Control Assembly (TCA) Pump Package Troubleshooting:  Wakata performed the initial TCA Low Temperature Loop (LTL) Pump Package troubleshooting.  This troubleshooting included an inspection of the unit and connectors.  The crew reported a small amount of condensate water near the manual valve then wiped it dry. Photographs of the inspection were taken then downlinked for ground specialist to review.  The TCA LTL Pump Package failed on January 14th. There are no spares currently onboard.  The JEM is operating in a single loop mode in order to maintain cooling for all of its hardware.

Express Rack 2 Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) Hardware Removal and Rack Modification:  The activity for Express Rack 2 removal of ARIS hardware and rack modification with K-BARs (Kneebrace Bolt Action Replacement) and Pivot brackets did not take place as planned today. The activity deferral was due to the crew’s inability to locate one of the needed pivot brackets. Completion of the activity would have allowed the rack to be rotated down more easily.  Ground teams are working on finding out whether or not an alternate bracket can be used.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Retractable Equipment Tether (RET) Inspection: Mastracchio gathered USOS EVA Tools and performed an inspection of retractable equipment tethers (RETs) that will be loaned to the Russians Segment (RS) for EVA 37A.  All of the standalone RETs passed the inspection; however the crew noted possible damage on the RET attached to the camera bracket and the D-ring extenders.  Ground teams will review photos and disposition the EVA Tools before the hardware handover is finalized.

Offline Artyom.

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Fresh Fruit Delivery to Station  :)

A fresh apple floating freely near a window in the Cupola of the International Space Station is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 38 crew member. Attached to the Harmony node, the Orbital Sciences Corp. Cygnus commercial cargo craft, which brought the fresh fruit, is visible at center. The bright sun, Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

http://www.nasa.gov/content/fresh-fruit-delivery-to-station/
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #143 on: 01/23/2014 03:47 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/22/14

Posted on January 22, 2014 by HQ.
 
Ocular Health (OH) Tonometry Examination:  Flight Engineer (FE)-6 Wakata acting as Crew Medical Officer (CMO) helped measure Hopkins’s blood pressure and vital signs and then conducted a vision and tonometry test on Hopkins. This was Hopkins’s Flight Day 120 session, which is the final session he will conduct on-orbit for this test. The Ocular Health protocol is a systematic gathering of physiological data to characterize the risk of microgravity-induced visual impairment / intracranial pressure in ISS crewmembers.  Researchers believe the measurement of visual, vascular and central nervous system changes over the course of this experiment and during the subsequent post flight recovery will assist in the development of countermeasures, clinical monitoring strategies, and clinical practice guidelines.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES)-Slosh:  Hopkins and FE-5 Mastracchio conferenced with ground teams to discuss their test run for SPHERES-Slosh. Mastracchio set up the 3DA1 camera prior to the test run. The SPHERES-Slosh investigation hardware includes a pill shaped transparent lexan tank, an aluminum support structure with attach points for the SPHERES satellites, and electronics including several digital cameras. The Slosh test objectives include determining the inertia values about the principal axes of the SPHERES-Slosh experiment, characterizing the performance of the 24 thrusters on the SPHERES-Slosh system given thruster plume impingement, performing translation, rotation, and pitch open-loop maneuvers to provide benchmarking data for the behavior of fluids in a microgravity environment. After the test run the data will be downlinked and the 3DA1 camera will be deactivated.

Cosmo Shoot Operations:  Wakata set up the Cosmo Shoot laptop and 4K camera this morning in the Cupola to prepare for capturing images of the Earth surface. Later in the day, he removed the hardware and temporarily stowed it back in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Node 2 Endcone Cleanout: Wakata cleaned out the Node 2 Endcone in preparation to use the location for prepacking cargo for return on SpaceX-3.

Offline John44

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #145 on: 01/25/2014 01:34 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/23/14

Posted on January 23, 2014 by HQ.

Body Measures Investigation:  Flight Engineer (FE)-6 Wakata, with operator assistance from FE-3 Hopkins, set up cameras and cabin video, performed body marker instrumentation, and collected calibration and body pose photos and circumference measurements. This is Wakata’s flight day 80 session, and is the third of six times he will conduct these measurements.  The goal of this study is to gather data to better understand the magnitude and variability of changes due to microgravity and fluid shifts within the human body during long-duration space flight.  Results of the investigation may result in changes to space suit fit and sizing, workstation design, etc. for future missions to maximize performance, prevent injury, and reduce crew time to accommodate their anthropometrics.

Ocular Health (OH) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Test and Fundoscope Examination:  FE-5 Mastracchio, performing as Crew Medical Officer (CMO), performed an OCT test of Hopkins.  Following the OCT examination, Hopkins applied drops to his eyes to dilate them.  Mastracchio conducted a Fundoscope eye examination of Hopkins with remote guidance from ground experts. The OCT and Fundoscsope activities are part of the Flight Day 120 session for Hopkins. The Ocular Health protocol calls for a systematic gathering of physiological data to characterize the risk of microgravity-induced visual impairment / intracranial pressure in ISS crewmembers.  Researchers believe the measurement of visual, vascular and central nervous system changes over the course of this experiment and during the subsequent post flight recovery will assist in the development of countermeasures, clinical monitoring strategies and clinical practice guidelines.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle (UR) and Filter Change out: Hopkins completed this routine maintenance consisting of WHC urine receptacle and filter removal and replacement. The activity was followed by a successful functionality test.

SpaceX-3 Prepack:  Wakata commenced prepacking activities in support of the upcoming SpaceX-3 mission. An estimated 25 hours of crew time will be spent towards prepacking activities in the coming weeks. SpaceX-3 is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 1st and rendezvous with ISS on March 3rd.

Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Camera Configuration: Wakata configured two D2X cameras in support of Russian Segment EVA 37A, which is scheduled for next Monday, January 27th.  The two cameras will be transferred to the Russian Segment on Friday in advance of Monday’s EVA.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #146 on: 01/30/2014 08:48 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/29/14

Posted on January 29, 2014 by HQ.


Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Low Temperature Loop (LTL) Pump Troubleshooting, Part 2:  Flight Engineer (FE)-5 Wakata used a multimeter to take resistance measurements to determine if there is a short circuit in the power feed path from Power Distribution Box (PDB) TCS1 to the LTL Pump Package. This troubleshooting is part of the investigation into the trip of the JEM Remote Power Controller (RPC) feeding power to the JEM LTL pump on January 14th.  The JEM Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) has been configured to single loop since the failure.
 
ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System (ISERV):  FE-3 Hopkins and Wakata partially removed the ISERV from the Window Observation Research Facility (WORF) and successfully replaced a failed pointing mount on the telescope tube with a new mount flown up on the Orbital-1 vehicle.  This replacement will allow ISERV to be used for pointed at desired targets instead of being restricted to a fixed pointing direction.  ISERV automatically takes images of Earth through a small telescope with an off-the-shelf digital camera mounted in the US Laboratory module. There is a significant and persistent need for image data to support environmental decision-making, and to assess and monitor the impact of disasters and other significant events of the Earth surface. The unique attributes of the ISS, both in terms of orbital characteristics and available human and infrastructure support make it a highly desirable platform from which to acquire these data.
 
Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Objective Lens Troubleshooting:  Hopkins installed LMM 10x lens inside the LMM Auxiliary Fluids Container (AFC).  This lens had become loose from position 4 in the LMM Objective Revolver.
 
Capillary Flow Experiment (CFE)-2 Vane Gap 1 Test:  FE-5 Mastracchio set up and initiated a CFE-2 Vane Gap 1 fluid test run.  Because liquids behave differently in space than they do on Earth, containers that can process, hold or transport them must be designed to work in microgravity. The CFE-2 furthers research on wetting (a liquid’s ability to spread across a surface) and its impact over large length scales in strange container shapes in microgravity environments. The results of these tests may be used to improve the capability to quickly and accurately predict how related processes occur, and support the design of improved systems to process liquids aboard spacecraft (i.e., liquid fuel tanks, thermals fluids, and water processing for life support).

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 38 thread (November 11, 2013 - March 12, 2014)
« Reply #148 on: 02/01/2014 06:58 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 01/30/14

Posted on January 30, 2014 by HQ.

ENERGY (Astronaut’s Energy Requirements for Long-Term Space Flight):  Flight Engineer (FE)-3 Hopkins continued with his standardized diet protocol for his 10 day session of ESA’s ENERGY experiment.  Today he collected water samples from the Potable Water Dispenser in the US Laboratory module, collected a urine sample, and logged all food and drink consumed.  A loss in an astronauts’ body mass is common during space flight.  ENERGY measures changes in the energy balance in crewmembers as a result of long term space flight.  It also measures adaptations in the components of total energy expenditure of crewmembers, so that an equation to determine the energy requirements of crewmembers during space flight may be derived. Such knowledge contributes to optimal crew health and performance, overall mission success, and to adequate exercise loading and food allotments while the crew is on-orbit.

NanoRacks Module 9 Investigation:  FE-6 Wakata activated and shook designated mixing tubes today for the third of six NanoRacks Module 9 sessions.  For this investigation student teams from across the United States designed their own experiments using flight approved fluids and materials. This investigation is part of the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP), which is sponsored by the commercial Science Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education program that is overseen by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE).  The tubes activated today were for investigations “The Effect of Microgravity of the Development of the Spotted Salamander,” “Mammalian Milk in Microgravity,” and “The Effect of Microgravity on the Oxidation of Metal Exposed to a Salt Water Solution.”

SpaceX-3 Prepack:  Wakata continued with prepacking activities in support of the upcoming SpaceX-3 mission. SpaceX-3 is scheduled to launch no earlier than March 1st and rendezvous with ISS on March 3rd.

Lab Inter-module Ventilation (IMV) Fan Cleaning:  Hopkins cleaned Lab Forward Port IMV fans. The task was performed as a result of low flow measurements taken in October 2013.  The measurement at the Lab Forward Port was 103 Cubic Feet per Minute (cfm).  The IMV flow should be greater than 115 cfm to ensure that the IMV fans are operating outside of the stall region and maintain station acoustic specification limits.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Air Hose and Liquid Indicator R&R: As part of preventative maintenance, FE-5 Mastracchio replaced WHC Hose Flexible Hose (A1-A8T) and T Adapter.

Offline Artyom.

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Aurora over Moscow  8) .

Photo by Sergei Ryazansky.
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

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