Author Topic: LIVE: Expedition 36 Russian Spacewalk (EVA-34) - August 16, 2013  (Read 31096 times)

Offline JimO

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I couldn'nt find any notice of any opportunity to drop an antenna cover, as was observed drifting outside two days later. Was there a cause-and-effect with the EVA or a coincidence, do you think?

Offline robertross

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I couldn'nt find any notice of any opportunity to drop an antenna cover, as was observed drifting outside two days later. Was there a cause-and-effect with the EVA or a coincidence, do you think?


Well considering the cover had close to zero momentum (as it was just hanging around), one would think that something just gave way, as an inadvertent knock would send it flying away in a relative hurry.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline JimO

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Well considering the cover had close to zero momentum (as it was just hanging around), one would think that something just gave way, as an inadvertent knock would send it flying away in a relative hurry. 

Even more important, the differential drag would have quickly instilled a separation rate even with zero relative motion. So I agree the object was seen very soon after it separated.

Moving in an aft direction is precisely the vector you'd expect early on. But very soon afterwards, not more than an hour or two, it would appear to drop, pick up forward speed, and pass beneath and out ahead of the station.

Now, WHY was it spotted? The crew doesn't regularly scan the skies, who was at the window, doing what?



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