Author Topic: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)  (Read 431291 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #860 on: 11/16/2017 06:32 PM »
Quote
Orbital ATK technicians put final touches on @NASA_SLS boosters’ aft exit cones as we continue to prepare for the vehicle’s EM-1 mission!

https://twitter.com/orbitalatk/status/931241992327229440

Offline ncb1397

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #861 on: 11/22/2017 06:17 PM »
Space Flight Insider video on LVSA and OSA components of SLS.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #862 on: 11/24/2017 05:56 AM »
Here's the next part talking engine the SLS Engine Section.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #863 on: 11/30/2017 01:44 PM »
MAF simulating SLS engine installation with RS-25 pathfinder
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/11/maf-engine-installation-rs-25-pathfinder/
« Last Edit: 11/30/2017 01:44 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline Eric Hedman

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #864 on: 11/30/2017 02:22 PM »
Here are some videos of NASA people visiting a contractor (Weldall in Waukesha, Wisconsin) building test equipment for SLS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGhcg2Qle04&feature=youtu.be

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7f04exu4sE&feature=youtu.be

Offline deruch

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #865 on: 11/30/2017 05:49 PM »
Here's the next part talking engine the SLS Engine Section.


Part 3 of the SFI Marshall tour, looking at the the structural test stands for the LOX and Hydrogen tanks:


« Last Edit: 11/30/2017 05:50 PM by deruch »
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Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #866 on: 12/05/2017 06:41 PM »
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Final assembly and transportation crew pose with the 10th @NASA_SLS booster segment as it goes into storage, completing a full flight set of solid rocket boosters!

https://twitter.com/orbitalatk/status/938101017966776320

Online AncientU

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #867 on: 12/05/2017 10:44 PM »
So, has it been determined what is the shelf-life of a new booster?
These need to sit for 3-4 years, the next ones being built for possibly twice that.
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
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Offline ncb1397

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #868 on: 12/05/2017 11:22 PM »
So, has it been determined what is the shelf-life of a new booster?
These need to sit for 3-4 years, the next ones being built for possibly twice that.

I don't know. The ICBMs and Ground Based Interceptors sit for a long time though. It is probably like canned food. After 100 years, you could probably eat it and be fine, but you wouldn't want to.
« Last Edit: 12/05/2017 11:49 PM by ncb1397 »

Offline JAFO

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #869 on: 12/06/2017 05:57 AM »
So, has it been determined what is the shelf-life of a new booster?
These need to sit for 3-4 years, the next ones being built for possibly twice that.

I don't know. The ICBMs and Ground Based Interceptors sit for a long time though. It is probably like canned food. After 100 years, you could probably eat it and be fine, but you wouldn't want to.

Must be some kind of date, wasn't the Ares I-X made up of expired 4 segment sections?
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Online AnalogMan

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #870 on: 12/06/2017 11:38 AM »
So, has it been determined what is the shelf-life of a new booster?
These need to sit for 3-4 years, the next ones being built for possibly twice that.

I don't know. The ICBMs and Ground Based Interceptors sit for a long time though. It is probably like canned food. After 100 years, you could probably eat it and be fine, but you wouldn't want to.

Must be some kind of date, wasn't the Ares I-X made up of expired 4 segment sections?

Originally shuttle RSRMs had a 5-year certified service life.  From ST-117 onwards that was extended to 5.5 years for already built motors.

The materials in the motor (or chemically similar materials) are used in rocket systems certified for 20+ years.  A shuttle flight verification motor (FVM-2) aged 7.2 years was test fired by ATK in May 2008 for life validation purposes.

Other limiting time requirements were: 1-year maximum stacked life, and 180 days max on pad.

Up to 39-year old Minuteman motors (which use similar materials) have been successfully static test fired.

Offline envy887

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #871 on: 12/11/2017 05:17 PM »
So, has it been determined what is the shelf-life of a new booster?
These need to sit for 3-4 years, the next ones being built for possibly twice that.

I don't know. The ICBMs and Ground Based Interceptors sit for a long time though. It is probably like canned food. After 100 years, you could probably eat it and be fine, but you wouldn't want to.

Must be some kind of date, wasn't the Ares I-X made up of expired 4 segment sections?

Originally shuttle RSRMs had a 5-year certified service life.  From ST-117 onwards that was extended to 5.5 years for already built motors.

The materials in the motor (or chemically similar materials) are used in rocket systems certified for 20+ years.  A shuttle flight verification motor (FVM-2) aged 7.2 years was test fired by ATK in May 2008 for life validation purposes.

Other limiting time requirements were: 1-year maximum stacked life, and 180 days max on pad.

Up to 39-year old Minuteman motors (which use similar materials) have been successfully static test fired.

I thought Minuteman used HTPB instead of PBAN in current SLS/STS motors?

Offline Hog

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #872 on: 12/11/2017 06:34 PM »
Space Shuttle solid-rocket booster Thiokol AP/PBAN/Al ca. 245 11-point star and tapered perforations 1981


Minuteman I
Stage 1 Thiokol AP/PBAA/Al ca. 245 6-point star 1962
Stage 2 Aerojet AP/polyurethane/Al ca. 270 4-point star 1962
Stage 3 Hercules Powder Company AP/HMX/nitrocellulose/ nitroglycerine/Al ca. 275 core and slotted tube modified end burner 1962

I cant find anything that directly discusses Minuteman-III using Hydroxyl-terminated Polybutadiene (HTPB).

Paul

Offline ncb1397

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #873 on: 12/19/2017 09:24 PM »
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The EM-1 Orion stage adapter, which joins the interim cryogenic propulsion stage to the Orion spacecraft, is nearly finished. In November, engineers installed mounting brackets to hold the 13 CubeSat secondary payload dispensers and one avionics unit. After fitting the brackets, technicians flipped the adapter and installed the diaphragm. The final steps before shipping the adapter to Kennedy Space Center include installing the avionics unit, connecting cables and performing electrical tests, and mounting a hazardous gas detection tube.
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/sls_november_mthly_highlights_web.pdf


Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #874 on: 02/03/2018 11:01 AM »
SLS Core Stage Engine Section Aces Testing


NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center
Published on Feb 2, 2018


NASA’s heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System, moved a step closer to the launch pad by acing a test of its engine section, the part of the rocket that houses SLS’s four RS-25 engines. The structural qualification test simulated the millions of pounds of force that the engine section will experience during lift-off and flight. (NASA/MSFC/Tyler Martin).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_XyUUFUj6s?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #875 on: 02/22/2018 12:04 AM »
How to Build a Rocket to Mars


Great Big Story
Published on Feb 21, 2018

In New Orleans’ bayou country, teams of engineers from Boeing are building the rocket that could put the first human on Mars. Working with NASA, these dedicated teams are designing and constructing the world’s largest and most powerful rocket in history, known as NASA’s Space Launch System. Together, Boeing and NASA are uncovering the next great frontier, building a future where humankind goes beyond Earth.

This Great Big Story is a paid contribution by Boeing:  http://beyondearth.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wH8WFpcQ8_c?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #876 on: 02/24/2018 12:14 PM »
Intertank at Michoud, and being loaded for a trip to Marshall.

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #877 on: 02/28/2018 06:29 PM »
FEATURE ARTICLE: NASA, Boeing rewriting the book on building the SLS Core Stage -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/02/nasa-boeing-rewriting-book-building-sls-core-stage/

- by Philip Sloss

Everything you wanted to know about the SLS Core Stage but were afraid to ask! 4000 words, so remember to also click "Page 2"!

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #878 on: 03/08/2018 05:16 PM »
Pegasus ships latest SLS test article to NASA Marshall for key tests -
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/03/pegasus-sls-test-article-nasa-marshall-tests/

By Philip Sloss. Incredibly meaty again!

Offline catdlr

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Re: SLS Development Stage UPDATE Thread (2)
« Reply #879 on: 03/09/2018 04:04 AM »
Hardware for NASA's SLS Rocket Boards Pegasus For Trip to Marshall


NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center
Published on Mar 8, 2018

A structural test version of the intertank for NASA's new exploration-class rocket, the Space Launch System, rolls out of the Vertical Assembly Center at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans Feb. 22, before it is loaded on the agency's barge Pegasus and delivered to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for critical testing. The test version of the intertank is structurally identical to the flight intertank, which will connect the core stage's two colossal fuel tanks, serve as the upper-connection point for the two solid rocket boosters and house critical avionics and electronics. The test hardware will undergo extensive structural testing to verify the rocket can withstand the extreme forces expected during launch and flight, especially booster ignition and separation. Pegasus, originally used during the Space Shuttle Program, has been redesigned and extended to accommodate the SLS rocket's massive, 212-foot-long core stage -- the backbone of the rocket. The 310-foot-long barge will ferry the flight core stage from Michoud to other NASA centers for tests and launch.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zb1e3N7mERI?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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