Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 - CASSIOPE - September, 2013 - GENERAL DISCUSSION THREAD  (Read 240265 times)

Offline Lars_J

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lets keep our finger's crossed for this flight. but since this launch vehicle has 9 engine's on its first stage let's not be surprised if it has an engine out on it's early launch's as seen with falcon 9 version one I expect at least one engine failure out of it's first 10 launches. probably two if falcon 9 version one was anything to go by.

I think you are maybe being a tad extreme in your concern. They have proven they learn from earlier mistakes. They have a robust test program. After all, their F9 flights have had a far better success record than the F1, despite the F9 being a significantly more complex launch vehicle. And the step from F9 to the v1.1 is far less.

Offline Halidon

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I haven't heard anything like that, just everyone assumes it will slip simply because of SpaceX's track record. It's been June 18th for a while now.
Ok. Thread consensus seems to be put that up unless/until it slips.
Just use "NET June 18th." Covers the date and the possibility of slippage, without everyone getting in a twist.

Online oiorionsbelt

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If all goes well, then we also have (rumored) post separation first stage action - some experimentation with pitch-over, re-start, some manner of re-entry attempt
and a soft water touch down. Hope we get to see that.

Offline guckyfan

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and a soft water touch down. Hope we get to see that.

Now there is an optimist.  ;D

You are aware, if that happens the largest remaining obstacle to first stage reusability would be finding a suitable landing location?

Online oiorionsbelt

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and a soft water touch down. Hope we get to see that.

Now there is an optimist.  ;D

You are aware, if that happens the largest remaining obstacle to first stage reusability would be finding a suitable landing location?

Landing location is Vandenberg, biggest obstacle will be FAA approval.  ;)

Online mlindner

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and a soft water touch down. Hope we get to see that.

Now there is an optimist.  ;D

You are aware, if that happens the largest remaining obstacle to first stage reusability would be finding a suitable landing location?


Thats only half the problem. Presumably they'd just slow themselves on the downward trajectory and land where their normal water impact would be. They still need to work out turning around and thrusting back to the landing location after that.

But I agree, if they actually manage a soft water landing my rational side will be very impressed, but my emotional side will be jumping for joy and dying of shock simultaneously.

Offline Mader Levap

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But I agree, if they actually manage a soft water landing
Hard water landing would be for me absolutely enough, considering currently stage just fall apart during reentry.
So let me get this straight....we are talking monkeys living on a dirt ball that circles a fireball? What the...?

Offline douglas100

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Hard water landing would be for me absolutely enough, considering currently stage just fall apart during reentry.

Yep, one step at a time. Also, the proposed experiment has essentially zero impact on the payload.
« Last Edit: 03/24/2013 04:13 PM by douglas100 »
Douglas Clark

Offline Zed_Noir

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With a possible water landing. Will SpaceX add some floatation gear to the 1st stage? Or will they relied on the natural buoyancy of the empty propellant tanks. Presuming the stage comes down more or less intact.

Online mlindner

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With a possible water landing. Will SpaceX add some floatation gear to the 1st stage? Or will they relied on the natural buoyancy of the empty propellant tanks. Presuming the stage comes down more or less intact.

We don't know the answer to that question. I would guess "no", because I feel this test is rather ad-hoc so they wouldn't add anything that they didn't plan to have on the actual Falcon 9 v1.1. They have no plans to do water landings in the future as far as we know, so its unlikely they would design this in.

Offline douglas100

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Agree with that. the big unknown is how the stage will behave during atmospheric flight. If they can restart and reduce the entry speed so that it survives then they will have gained useful information. A restart just before hitting the sea would be icing on the cake.
Douglas Clark

Online QuantumG

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Some details about the payload:

  http://mertensiana.phys.ucalgary.ca/cassiope.html

"CAScade, Smallsat and IOnospheric Polar Explorer" (CASSIOPE) is a made-in-Canada small satellite from the Canadian Space Agency. It is comprised of three working elements that will use the first multi-purpose small satellite platform from the Canadian Small Satellite Bus Program. This generic, low-cost platform will carry two payloads: e-POP, a scientific payload consisting of eight high-resolution instruments used to probe the characteristics of near-Earth space, and Cascade, a high data rate, high capacity store and forward technology payload from MDA Corporation.

Together, e-POP and Cascade will achieve both a scientific and a commercial objective: e-POP will provide scientists with unprecedented details about the Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere and magnetosphere, helping scientists understand the cause and effects of potentially dangerous space weather, while Cascade will demonstrate a new digital communications 'courier' service provided by MDA.

CASSIOPE is hexagonal in shape, measuring just 180 cm corner-to-corner and 125 cm high and weighing in at just over 500 kg. Partners in the mission include the University of Calgary, Commuications Research Centre in Ottawa, Bristol Aerospace of Winnipeg, and MDA of Richmond, B.C., the prime contractor for the overall mission.

See also: http://mertensiana.phys.ucalgary.ca/quickfacts.html
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Offline Zed_Noir

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while Cascade will demonstrate a new digital communications 'courier' service provided by MDA.

Does this mean the folks at the South Pole area in the Antarctic will  get high bandwidth burst satellite communication?

Online QuantumG

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while Cascade will demonstrate a new digital communications 'courier' service provided by MDA.

Does this mean the folks at the South Pole area in the Antarctic will  get high bandwidth burst satellite communication?

Maybe. :)

More details: http://mertensiana.phys.ucalgary.ca/cascade.html
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Offline Prober

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anything on the timeline when the device was finished being built?
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

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