Author Topic: ATK Launch Abort hardware arrives at KSC ahead of EFT-1 (LAS Feature)  (Read 3721 times)

Online Chris Bergin

  • NSF Managing Editor
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 96406
  • Liked: 5954
EFT-1 and some Constellation to SpaceX LAS featuring, a better refined version of a longer feature a year ago:

ATK Launch Abort hardware arrives at KSC ahead of EFT-1
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2013/02/atk-launch-abort-system-arrives-ksc-eft-1/

Offline Lars_J

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6163
  • Liked: 660
  • California
A very nice article!

However, one things seems wrong. The LAS for the EFT-1 mission is listed (and shown in the picture) as inert... But doesn't it have to be fully functional to be ejected/activated in flight?

Online Chris Bergin

  • NSF Managing Editor
  • Administrator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 96406
  • Liked: 5954
A very nice article!

However, one things seems wrong. The LAS for the EFT-1 mission is listed (and shown in the picture) as inert... But doesn't it have to be fully functional to be ejected/activated in flight?

Thanks, and I believe there is a top half to go on to this motor, which will have those live thrusters. This is like the core of the LAS, with the Upper Stage yet to arrive.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12838
  • Liked: 350
  • Houten, The Netherlands
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, launch abort motor arrives at the Launch Abort System Facility for Exploration Flight Test 1, or EFT-1, of the agency’s Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. ATK’s abort motor is part of Orion’s Launch Abort System, which is designed to safely pull the Orion crew module away from the launch vehicle in the event of an emergency on the launch pad or during the initial ascent of NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, rocket. The test flight abort motor is configured with inert propellant. Orion is the exploration spacecraft designed to carry crews to space beyond low Earth orbit. It will provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during the space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. Orion’s first unpiloted test flight is scheduled to launch in 2014 atop a Delta IV rocket. A second uncrewed flight test is scheduled for 2017 on the SLS rocket. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/orion. Photo credit: NASA/Charisse Nahser

Offline phred

  • Member
  • Posts: 83
  • Liked: 0
Once again, thanks for an informative article!

I didn't know that the Ares I engineers were considering using the impulse of the LAS to assist in ascent.  I always wondered if that could be done.

I'm also wondering if the present design is different from the LAS designed for Ares I.  I was under the impression that it had unusually high thrust in order to get away from a running SRB.

Offline Longhorn John

  • Regular
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1449
  • Liked: 1
It's much bigger than I thought it would be!

Offline rdale

  • Assistant to the Chief Meteorologist
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9670
  • Liked: 54
  • Lansing MI
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Orion Flight Test Office was tasked with conducting a series of flight tests in several launch abort scenarios to certify that the Orion Launch Abort System is capable of delivering astronauts aboard the Orion Crew Module to a safe environment, away from a failed booster. The first of this series was the Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight-Test Vehicle, which was successfully flown on May 6, 2010 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. This report provides a brief overview of the three propulsive subsystems used on the Pad Abort 1 Flight-Test Vehicle. An overview of the propulsive systems originally planned for future flight-test vehicles is also provided, which also includes the cold gas Reaction Control System within the Crew Module, and the Peacekeeper first stage rocket motor encased within the Abort Test Booster aeroshell. Although the Constellation program has been cancelled and the operational role of the Orion spacecraft has significantly evolved, lessons learned from Pad Abort 1 and the other flight-test vehicles could certainly contribute to the vehicle architecture of many future human-rated space launch vehicles

Tags: