Author Topic: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia  (Read 140991 times)

Offline Targeteer

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Offline Targeteer

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Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #522 on: 10/16/2013 11:11 AM »
"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #523 on: 10/16/2013 11:11 AM »
Biggest chunk of Russian meteorite lifted from lakebed


http://rt.com/news/largest-fragment-meteorite-lifted-258/
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Offline TomH

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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #525 on: 10/16/2013 10:59 PM »
I suspect that is the pebble pictured above ...
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Offline Danderman

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #526 on: 10/16/2013 11:44 PM »
or, it is some random rock that happened to be under water the other day.

Offline Silmfeanor

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #527 on: 10/17/2013 12:04 AM »
or, it is some random rock that happened to be under water the other day.

Please, did you even read the article?

Quote
Sergei Zamozdra, an associate professor at Chelyabinsk State University, told Russian television the excavated fragment was definitely a chunk of the meteorite.

So unless you have a credible source that says otherwise....

Offline go4mars

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #528 on: 10/17/2013 04:51 AM »
The huge hole in the ice strongly implied this should happen.  Delightful that they got it!  Good work.
Elasmotherium; hurlyburly Doggerlandic Jentilak steeds insouciantly gallop in viridescent taiga, eluding deluginal Burckle's abyssal excavation.

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #529 on: 10/17/2013 03:09 PM »
More glad it was intact, and did not shatter on impacting the ice! Guess the meteor was tougher than Russian Ice!

So if the recovered fragment was 570 kg and the parent an estimated 11,000 tonnes they just recovered 0.005%
« Last Edit: 10/17/2013 03:10 PM by kevin-rf »
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Offline Mader Levap

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #530 on: 10/17/2013 07:22 PM »
or, it is some random rock that happened to be under water the other day.
Yes, because geologists are idiots that cannot tell apart one rock from another.

Nice troll, BTW.
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #531 on: 10/17/2013 07:27 PM »
You know you could always drop a rock on the troll ;)
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Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #532 on: 10/17/2013 08:01 PM »
The mineralogical analysis should be interesting: Was is metal (if so, which) or silicate?
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Offline hop

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #533 on: 10/17/2013 08:48 PM »
The mineralogical analysis should be interesting: Was is metal (if so, which) or silicate?
Many fragments have already be recovered and analyzed.  It is classified as an ordinary chondrite. It is unlikely the big chunk will be much different.

See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelyabinsk_meteorite

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1134%2FS0016702913070100

Offline ClaytonBirchenough

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #534 on: 10/17/2013 10:00 PM »
Is the meteorite 570 kg? I was reading that the scale they originally weighed it on broke at this weight...
Clayton Birchenough
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Offline Targeteer

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #535 on: 10/22/2013 01:40 PM »
Determining the orbit from satellite images of the re-entry

http://phys.org/news/2013-10-scientists-satellites-captured-chelyabinsk-meteor.html
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Offline Targeteer

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #536 on: 11/06/2013 08:21 PM »
RELEASE 13-327 
   
 NASA and International Researchers Obtain Crucial Data from Meteoroid Impact 
 
A team of NASA and international scientists for the first time have gathered a detailed understanding of the effects on Earth from a small asteroid impact. 

The unprecedented data obtained as the result of the airburst of a meteoroid over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15, has revolutionized scientists' understanding of this natural phenomenon.

The Chelyabinsk incident was well observed by citizen cameras and other assets. This factor provided a unique opportunity for researchers to calibrate the event, with implications for the study of near-Earth objects (NEOs) and the development of hazard mitigation strategies for planetary defense. Scientists from nine countries now have established a new benchmark for future asteroid impact modeling. 

"Our goal was to understand all circumstances that resulted in the shock wave," said meteor expert Peter Jenniskens, co-lead author of a report published in the journal Science.

Jenniskens, a meteor astronomer at NASA’s Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute, participated in a field study led by Olga Popova of the Institute for Dynamics of Geospheres of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow in the weeks following the event.

“It was important that we followed up with the many citizens who had firsthand accounts of the event and recorded incredible video while the experience was still fresh in their minds," said Popova. 

By calibrating the video images from the position of the stars in the night sky, Jenniskens and Popova calculated the impact speed of the meteor at 42,500 mph (19 kilometers per second). As the meteor penetrated through the atmosphere, it fragmented into pieces, peaking at 19 miles (30 kilometers) above the surface. At that point the superheated meteor appeared brighter than the sun, even for people 62 miles (100 kilometers) away.

Because of the extreme heat, many pieces of the meteor vaporized before reaching Earth. Scientists believe that between 9,000 to 13,000 pounds (4,000 to 6,000 kilograms) of meteorites fell to the ground. This amount included one fragment weighing approximately 1,400 pounds (650 kilograms). This fragment wasrecovered from Lake Chebarkul on Oct. 16 by professional divers guided by Ural Federal University researchers in Yekaterinburg, Russia.

NASA researchers participating in the 59 member consortium study suspect the abundance of shock fractures in the rock contributed its breakup in the upper atmosphere. Meteorites made available by Chelyabinsk State University researchers were analyzed to learn about the origin of the shock veins and their physical properties. Shock veins are caused by asteroid collisions. When asteroid collide with each other, heat generated by the impact causes iron and nickel components of the objects to melt. These melts cool into thin masses, forming metal veins – shock veins – in the objects.

"One of these meteorites broke along one of these shock veins when we pressed on it during our analysis," said Derek Sears, a meteoriticist at Ames.

Mike Zolensky, a cosmochemist at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, may have found why these shock veins (or shock fractures), were so frail. They contained layers of small iron grains just inside the vein, which had precipitated out of the glassy material when it cooled.

"There are cases where impact melt increases a meteorite's mechanical strength, but Chelyabinsk was weakened by it," said Zolensky.

The impact that created the shock veins may have occurred as long ago as 4.4 billion years. This would have been 115 million years after the formation of the solar system, according to the research team, who found the meteorites had experienced a significant impact event at that time.

“Events that long ago affected how the Chelyabinsk meteoroid broke up in the atmosphere, influencing the damaging shockwave,” said Jenniskens.

NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program sponsors research to better understand the origin and nature of NEOs. These essential studies are needed to inform our approach to preparing for the potential discovery and deflection of an object on a collision course with the Earth.

NASA's recently announced asteroid initiative includes the first mission to capture and relocate an asteroid, as well as a grand challenge to find and characterize all asteroid threats to human population. It represents an unprecedented technological feat that will lead to new scientific discoveries and technological capabilities that will help protect our home planet.

Aside from representing a potential threat, the study of asteroids and comets represent a valuable opportunity to learn more about the origins of our solar system, the source of water on the Earth, and even the origin of organic molecules that lead to the development of life.

For more information about the Chelyabinsk field study visit:

http://cams.seti.org/index-chelyabinsk.html

For more information on asteroids and comets, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/asteroids
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Offline Star One

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #537 on: 11/06/2013 08:28 PM »
Reported on BBC news. So an early warning system is needed, didn't we just discontinue one of those.

Quote
The threat of another asteroid strike like the one that hit Russia earlier this year is much higher than was previously thought, a study suggests.

Researchers have found that space rocks of a similar size to the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk are hurtling into the Earth's atmosphere with surprising frequency.

Scientists say early warning systems need to be put in place.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-24839601
« Last Edit: 11/06/2013 08:31 PM by Star One »

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #538 on: 11/07/2013 11:17 AM »
Purely for completeness, according to a study reported in The Daily Mail, the explosion of the bolide was about equivalent to 400kt of TNT.

We should be grateful it happened in the mesosphere; one doesn't want to contemplate what would have happened if it had detonated at a lower altitude over a population centre.
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Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Meteor Strikes Chelyabinsk, Russia
« Reply #539 on: 11/07/2013 12:13 PM »
A little off topic, but a bright fireball lit up Southern California last night:

(Discovery channel has a video)

http://news.discovery.com/space/asteroids-meteors-meteorites/possible-taurid-fireball-dazzles-southern-california-131107.htm
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