Author Topic: The naming of ships and spacecraft  (Read 6765 times)

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #20 on: 07/08/2014 12:18 AM »
Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity and Curiousity were named in contests with school children, and if I remember correctly, so was Shuttle Endeavour.   That is another great way to induce public interest in your projects.  I like the fact that Nasa had already considered Endeavour as a shuttle name. 

Offline Robert Thompson

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #21 on: 07/08/2014 06:38 AM »
Ebb and Flow
http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012/jan/HQ_12-019_GRAIL_Name.html

( And some time after OSIRIS Rex had secured funding, a contest for naming the target: Bennu
http://www.planetary.org/get-involved/contests/osirisrex/ )

Offline Jim

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #22 on: 07/08/2014 03:45 PM »
workers tend to use the original names

Offline simonbp

Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #23 on: 07/08/2014 11:25 PM »
workers tend to use the original names

It depends on how late the name was adopted. New Horizons never really had an original name besides "the APL PKB (Pluto-Kuiper Belt) mission". They started using the name in the proposal and it has stuck since. The same is true for most competed missions (i.e. Discovery and New Frontiers); whatever name is on the proposal sticks. And even on the non-competed missions, it's pretty rare to hear anyone refer to just the Space Telescope (aka Hubble) or the Next Generation Space Telescope (aka JWST).

Here's Alan Stern's story on how he can up with the name for New Horizons: www.thespacereview.com/article/369/1

Offline Jim

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #24 on: 07/09/2014 02:03 AM »
And even on the non-competed missions, it's pretty rare to hear anyone refer to just the Space Telescope (aka Hubble) or the Next Generation Space Telescope (aka JWST).


Those were/are named long before they were launched.

Offline Space Pete

Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #25 on: 07/10/2014 12:22 AM »
I know this isn't space, but - it's just cool! The UK's old (HMS Illustrious) and new (HMS Queen Elizabeth) aircraft carriers, side-by-side. Check out the size difference!

And just to make it space related - I bet you could land a Dream Chaser aboard the QE! Or how about sending the QE to recover an Orion crew one day! ;)
« Last Edit: 07/10/2014 12:29 AM by Space Pete »
Electronic Engineer by day, NASASpaceflight's ISS Editor by night | Read my NASASpaceflight articles here

Offline woods170

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #26 on: 07/10/2014 02:03 PM »
I know this isn't space, but - it's just cool! The UK's old (HMS Illustrious) and new (HMS Queen Elizabeth) aircraft carriers, side-by-side. Check out the size difference!

And just to make it space related - I bet you could land a Dream Chaser aboard the QE!
Only with a tail hook, a seriously beefed up landing gear and go-round capability. Which it will not have I might add.

Offline Nomadd

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #27 on: 07/10/2014 04:51 PM »
I know this isn't space, but - it's just cool! The UK's old (HMS Illustrious) and new (HMS Queen Elizabeth) aircraft carriers, side-by-side. Check out the size difference!

And just to make it space related - I bet you could land a Dream Chaser aboard the QE!
Only with a tail hook, a seriously beefed up landing gear and go-round capability. Which it will not have I might add.
Naw. You just need the ship going 30 knots into a 40 knot headwind.

Offline Orbital Debris

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #28 on: 07/18/2014 04:13 PM »
This all reminds me of the quote from Rickover when they changed the naming of US submarines from fish (SSN-637 class) to cities (SSN-688 class) and states (SSBN-627 class).  Subs had been named after fish since WWII, when asked about the change, Rickover said simply: "Fish don't vote."

Offline JGPeters

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Re: The naming of ships and spacecraft
« Reply #29 on: 11/21/2014 02:26 PM »
Always been fascinated by the naming of ships and spaceships, but also Navy traditions. I notice the massive Royal Navy fleet from World War I seems to have been named after cities, but the German fleet were named after people?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30128199

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