Author Topic: LIVE: H-IIA GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) Feb 27, 2014 (1837UTC)  (Read 23653 times)

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2122
  • Liked: 213
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
NASA | GPM Enters Thermal Vacuum Chamber

Scheduled for launch in February 2014
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=1181.msg837844#msg837844

Published on Dec 10, 2012

On Tuesday Nov. 13, 2012, the GPM core observatory was moved
from the clean room to the thermal vacuum chamber. The spacecraft, wrapped in protective blankets, made the short trip by crane across the testing facility where it was then lowered into the 40-foot (12 meter) diameter test chamber.

« Last Edit: 03/03/2014 09:25 AM by input~2 »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
GPM Anime Challenge   :D
http://pmm.nasa.gov/education/anime
Anime is a Japanese style of animation popular around the world. Anime characters have filled television shows and comics, and inspired costumes and educational activities. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) and our partners at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are holding a design challenge for people around the world to develop an Anime character for GPM.

http://pmm.nasa.gov/education/anime-japanese (Japanese URL)

Online Galactic Penguin SST

  • Geek Penguin in Earth Orbit
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Liked: 395
  • Hong Kong
From Twitter:

Quote
TRMM & GPM Missions ‏@NASA_Rain
#GPM is currently on track to launch on February 14th 2014
Hmm....where can I apply for the job of United Launch Alliance internet cheerleader?

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2122
  • Liked: 213
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
NASA | Our Wet Wide World

Published on Apr 12, 2013
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission to provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch a "Core" satellite carrying advanced instruments that will set a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The data they provide will be used to unify precipitation measurements made by an international network of partner satellites to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world.

The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
GPM Spreads Its Wings in Solar Array Deployment Test
http://www.nasa.gov/content/gpm-spreads-its-wings-in-solar-array-deployment-test/index.html#.UdIJDNhgoQA

NASA successfully completed two pre-vibration solar array deployment tests of the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite on June 6 and June 15, 2013.

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
Winners of the GPM Anime Challenge
http://pmm.nasa.gov/education/anime-winners

Grand Prize Winners

Offline blister

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 180
  • Liked: 3
  • Yamagata.Japan
The rader press opening is here.
Detected by NVS.
http://i.nicovideo.jp/watch/1330112255

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12929
  • Liked: 411
  • Houten, The Netherlands
MEDIA ADVISORY M13-146

Media Invited to Final Prelaunch Exhibition of New Weather Satellite

News and social media members have an opportunity to get an up-close look at NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory satellite Tuesday, Oct. 8, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., in its final public appearance.

Reporters will meet at Goddard's Visitor Center at 10 a.m. EDT, where they can speak with scientists and view a new short film from Science on a Sphere called Water Falls. After the film, they will tour the clean room and speak with engineers who built the satellite.

GPM, scheduled for shipment to its launch site at Tanegashima Space Center in Japan after this event, is an international satellite mission led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency that will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours.

Reporters also will have the opportunity to speak with scientists at Goddard's 15-screen hyperwall to discuss the applications of GPM data, including how rainfall data fit into climate models and contribute to understanding the bigger Earth system. All speakers will be available for interviews.

GPM is the first of four NASA missions launching in 2014 to observe Earth. It will provide unprecedented 3-D views of hurricanes, snowstorms, even light rain, and its data will contribute to the monitoring and forecasting of weather events such as droughts, floods and hurricanes. In addition, its long-term record of rainfall data will aid scientists in their studies of climate change.

To attend, foreign journalists must register by contacting Ellen Gray at 301-286-1950 or ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov by Wednesday, Sept. 25. Journalists who are U.S. citizens should register by Friday, Oct. 4.

NASA also is inviting 30 social media users to apply for credentials to attend the media day. Registration for U.S. citizens active on social media begins Wednesday, Sept. 11 and closes Monday, Sept. 30. Accreditation applications will be considered on a case-by-case basis. To apply, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/17Qosbd

For more information about the GPM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/gpm

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
DPR Special Movie (Animation)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12929
  • Liked: 411
  • Houten, The Netherlands
MEDIA ADVISORY M13-165

Media Invited to View New Earth Science Satellite before Shipment to Japan

Media have the opportunity Friday, Nov. 15, to get a closer look at NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite before it is shipped to Japan for launch in early 2014.

Media will meet at the Visitors Center at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., at 9:30 a.m. EST, where they will be briefed on the mission and speak with mission scientists. This will be followed by a tour of the spacecraft clean room and opportunities to interview the engineers who built the satellite.

Reporters also will have time to speak with scientists at Goddard's 15-screen Hyperwall about the applications of GPM data, including how rainfall data fit into climate models and contribute to understanding of the entire Earth system. All speakers will be available for interviews.

GPM, scheduled for shipment to the Tanegashima Space Center in November, is an international satellite mission led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. It will provide next-generation observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours, as well as unprecedented 3-D views of hurricanes and snowstorms. GPM data will contribute to the monitoring and forecasting of weather events such as droughts, floods and hurricanes.

To attend, media must register by contacting Ellen Gray at 301-286-1950 or ellen.t.gray@nasa.gov no later than Nov. 7. Social media registration is closed.

For more information about the GPM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/gpm
« Last Edit: 10/31/2013 06:39 PM by jacqmans »

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
Nov. 24th, GPM arrived kitakyushu airport in Japan.
Next shipping to the Tanegashima by ship.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

  • Geek Penguin in Earth Orbit
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4650
  • Liked: 395
  • Hong Kong
Nov. 24th, GPM arrived kitakyushu airport in Japan.
Next shipping to the Tanegashima by ship.

I wonder why they flew to Kitakyushu and not Kagoshima? (no immigration officers stationed there?)
Hmm....where can I apply for the job of United Launch Alliance internet cheerleader?

Offline Fuji

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1019
  • Liked: 42
  • Japan
I wonder why they flew to Kitakyushu and not Kagoshima? (no immigration officers stationed there?)

I feel the same thing.


JAXA HP news and more photos here.
http://www.satnavi.jaxa.jp/gpmdpr_special/column/2013/post1125.html
Quote
The core observatory for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission arrived at Kitakyushu Airport in Japan from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the U.S.A. about 12:28 p.m. on Nov. 24 (Sun.) The GPM core observatory was jointly developed by JAXA and NASA. After arrival at the airport, the satellite was then transported to the Tanegashima Space Center by cargo ship for launch by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle. Its arrival here was originally scheduled for the 22nd, but it was delayed for two days due to bad weather in Alaska, where the cargo plane stopped for refueling.

Offline russianhalo117

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1420
  • Liked: 43
  • AR USA / Berlin, DE / Moscow, RF
Nov. 24th, GPM arrived kitakyushu airport in Japan.
Next shipping to the Tanegashima by ship.

I wonder why they flew to Kitakyushu and not Kagoshima? (no immigration officers stationed there?)
It might come down to if both can support C-5M Super Galaxy Aircraft.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12929
  • Liked: 411
  • Houten, The Netherlands

RELEASE 13-346

NASA Delivers Precipitation Satellite to Japan for 2014 Launch


A U.S. Air Force C-5 transport aircraft carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory landed at Kitakyushu Airport in Japan at approximately 10:30 p.m. EST Saturday, Nov. 23. (Credit: JAXA)

An international satellite that will set a new standard for global precipitation measurements from space has completed a 7,300-mile journey from the United States to Japan, where it now will undergo launch preparations.

A U.S. Air Force C-5 transport aircraft carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory landed at Kitakyushu Airport, about 600 miles southwest of Tokyo, at approximately 10:30 p.m. EST Saturday, Nov. 23.

The spacecraft, the size of a small private jet, is the largest satellite ever built at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. It left Goddard inside a large shipping container Nov. 19 and began its journey across the Pacific Ocean Nov. 21 from Joint Base Andrews in Maryland, with a refueling stop in Anchorage, Alaska.

From Kitakyushu Airport, the spacecraft was loaded onto a barge heading to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Tanegashima Space Center on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan, where it will be prepared for launch in early 2014 on an H-IIA rocket.

"We have been building GPM hardware at Goddard for over four years," said Art Azarbarzin, GPM project manager, who traveled with the spacecraft on its flight to Japan. "We are excited now to get the spacecraft to Tanegashima and looking forward to the launch."

The satellite is designed to pool together precipitation measurements taken by a constellation of orbiting U.S. and international partner satellites, resulting in a single and comprehensive dataset of global precipitation every three hours.

The satellite will measure rain and snow using two science instruments: the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI captures precipitation intensities and horizontal patterns, while the DPR provides insights into the three-dimensional structure of rain, snow and other precipitation particles. Together, these two instruments provide a database of measurements against which other partner satellites' microwave observations can be meaningfully compared and combined to make a global precipitation dataset.

The GPM mission is a partnership led by NASA and JAXA. Goddard built and assembled the satellite. JAXA provided the DPR instrument and launch services. The Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo., built the GMI under contract to Goddard.

The GPM constellation is a network of satellites from multiple U.S. and international space agencies, including NASA, JAXA, the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Japan; the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales in France; the Indian Space Research Organisation; and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites.

For more information about the GPM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/gpm

Tags: