Author Topic: LIVE: H-IIA GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) Feb 27, 2014 (1837UTC)  (Read 58755 times)

Offline DavidH

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HGA deployment compete.
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Offline blister

Tanegashima now

Offline Artyom.

Congrats to JAXA  :) !

"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline Artyom.

Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

"Earth is the cradle of humanity, but one cannot live in a cradle forever." - Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky.

Offline Fuji

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GPM separation and ShindaiSat separation photos.

Offline DavidH

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The GMI electronics have been powered on.
The GMI main reflector and spin mechanism have been deployed and are ready for science.
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Offline DavidH

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And DPR's electronics are powered up.
It'll be next week before the rest of GMI and DPR are turned on and can begin taking science data to begin calibration activities.
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Offline Fuji

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Offline yoichi

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GPM/H-IIA F23 Quick Review


Offline Fuji

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First images are released.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2014/03/20140325_gpm_j.html  (Japanese press release)

Video version.

Online jacqmans

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March 25, 2014
First Images Available from NASA-JAXA Global Rain and Snowfall Satellite   


NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have released the first images captured by their newest Earth-observing satellite, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, which launched into space Feb. 27.

The images show precipitation falling inside a March 10 cyclone over the northwest Pacific Ocean, approximately 1,000 miles east of Japan. The data were collected by the GPM Core Observatory's two instruments: JAXA's Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which imaged a three-dimensional cross-section of the storm; and, NASA's GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which observed precipitation across a broad swath.

"It was really exciting to see this high-quality GPM data for the first time," said GPM project scientist Gail Skofronick-Jackson at NASA's Goddard Spaceflight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "I knew we had entered a new era in measuring precipitation from space. We now can measure global precipitation of all types, from light drizzle to heavy downpours to falling snow."

The satellite's capabilities are apparent in the first images of the cyclone. Cyclones such as the one imaged -- an extra-tropical cyclone -- occur when masses of warm air collide with masses of cold air north or south of the tropics. These storm systems can produce rain, snow, ice, high winds, and other severe weather. In these first images, the warm front ahead of the cyclone shows a broad area of precipitation -- in this case, rain -- with a narrower band of precipitation associated with the cold front trailing to the southwest. Snow is seen falling in the northern reaches of the storm.

The GMI instrument has 13 channels that measure natural energy radiated by Earth's surface and also by precipitation itself. Liquid raindrops and ice particles affect the microwave energy differently, so each channel is sensitive to a different precipitation type. With the addition of four new channels, the GPM Core Observatory is the first spacecraft designed to detect light rain and snowfall from space.

In addition to seeing all types of rain, GMI's technological advancements allow the instrument to identify rain structures as small as about 3 to 9 miles (5 to 15 kilometers) across. This higher resolution is a significant improvement over the capability of an earlier instrument flown on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission in 1997.

"You can clearly see them in the GMI data because the resolution is that much better," said Skofronick-Jackson.

The DPR instrument adds another dimension to the observations that puts the data into high relief. The radar sends signals that bounce off the raindrops and snowflakes to reveal the 3D structure of the entire storm. Like GMI, its two frequencies are sensitive to different rain and snow particle sizes. One frequency senses heavy and moderate rain. A new, second radar frequency is sensitive to lighter rainfall and snowfall.

"Both return independent measurements of the size of raindrops or snowflakes and how they are distributed within the weather system," said DPR scientist Bob Meneghini at Goddard. "DPR allows scientists to see at what height different types of rain and snow or a mixture occur -- details that show what is happening inside sometimes complicated storm systems."

The DPR data, combined with data from GMI, also contribute to more accurate rain estimates. Scientists use the data from both instruments to calculate the rain rate, which is how much rain or snow falls to Earth. Rain rate is one of the Core Observatory's essential measurements for understanding where water is on Earth and where it's going.

"All this new information comes together to help us better understand how fresh water moves through Earth's system and contributes to things like floods and droughts," said Skofronick-Jackson.

GMI was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Corp., in Boulder, Colo., under contract to NASA. DPR was developed by JAXA with the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology.

These first GPM Core Observatory images were captured during the first few weeks after launch, when mission controllers at the NASA Goddard Mission Operations Center put the spacecraft and its science instruments through their paces to ensure they were healthy and functioning as expected. The engineering team calibrates the sensors, and Goddard's team at the Precipitation Processing System verifies the accuracy of the data.

This initial science data from the GPM Core Observatory will be validated and then released for free by September online at:

http://pps.gsfc.nasa.gov

For more information and the GPM mission, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/gpm


Offline DavidH

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GMI (GPM Microwave Imager) first (released) light images and movie as well.

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/march/first-images-available-from-nasa-jaxa-global-rain-and-snowfall-satellite/#.UzGnp4V92ao

Youtube description and imagery.


High res. first light images:
http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a000000/a004100/a004153/
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Offline Fuji

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New observation data are released from JAXA.





And more grapics are here.
http://www.eorc.jaxa.jp/imgdata/topics/2014/tp140630.html


Offline catdlr

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GPM Core Observatory Views Feb. 21, 2015, Storm

Published on Feb 26, 2015
At 10:05 a.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over a snow storm that covered most of the Washington, D.C., metro area leaving as much as 9 inches of snow in some of the surrounding suburbs.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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GPM Constellation with Clock

Published on Feb 26, 2015
In this animation the orbit paths of the NASA partner satellites of the GPM constellation fill in blue as the instruments pass over Earth. Rainfall appears light blue for light rain, yellow for moderate, and red for heavy rain. Partner satellites are traced in green and purple, and the GPM Core is traced in red.

Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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February 26, 2015
RELEASE 15-007 (Goddard)
NASA Releases First Global Rainfall and Snowfall Map from New Mission

http://www.nasa.gov/press/goddard/2015/february/nasa-releases-first-global-rainfall-and-snowfall-map-from-new-mission/#.VO9-mPnF-kE

You Tube Video:
Published on Feb 26, 2015
NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched one year ago on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM data product, called IMERG, which combines all of these data from 12 satellites into a single, seamless map.

The map covers more of the globe than any previous precipitation data set and is updated every half hour, allowing scientists to see how rain and snow storms move around nearly the entire planet. As scientists work to understand all the elements of Earth’s climate and weather systems, and how they could change in the future, GPM provides a major step forward in providing the scientific community comprehensive and consistent measurements of precipitation.

« Last Edit: 02/26/2015 07:15 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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NASA | GPM in a Minute

Published on Feb 26, 2015
What does building a satellite look like? In this timelapse of clean room footage from 2011 to 2014, watch the Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory come together at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center then fly across the Pacific where mission partner, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, prepared and launched it into orbit, on Feb. 27, 2014.

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission observes rain and snowfall worldwide every three hours, which contributes to the monitoring and forecasting of weather events such as droughts, floods and hurricanes, as well scientific research on precipitation and climate change.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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GPM Core Observatory Views Feb. 17, 2015, Storm

Published on Feb 26, 2015
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory captured a 3-D image of a winter storm on Feb. 17, 2015, that left 6 to 12 inches of snow over much of Kentucky, southwestern West Virginia and northwestern North Carolina. The shades of blue indicate rates of snowfall, with more intense snowfall shown in darker blue. Intense rainfall is shown in red. The imagery shows great variation in precipitation types over the southeastern United States.

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and snow, which constitutes a crucial part of the storm structure – and helps to define how it will develop. The GPM Microwave Imager sees through the tops of clouds to observe how much and where precipitation occurs, while the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar observes precise details of precipitation in three dimensions.

GPM data is part of the toolbox of satellite data used by forecasters and scientists to understand how storms form. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.


Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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NASA | A Week in the Life of Rain

Published on Apr 1, 2015
For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/t...

Rain, snow, hail, ice, and every slushy mix in between make up the precipitation that touches everyone on our planet. But not all places rain equally. Precipitation falls differently in different parts of the world, as you see in NASA's new video that captures every shower, every snow storm and every hurricane from August 4 to August 14, 2014. The GPM Core Observatory, co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), was launched on Feb 27, 2014, and provides advanced instruments that can see rain and falling snow all the way through the atmosphere. This Core Observatory serves as the reference standard to unite preciptiation observations from a dozen satellites, which together produce the most detailed world-wide view of everything from light rain to heavy rain and, for the first time, falling snow. Scientists merged data from 12 precipitation satellites into a single seamless map called the Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM), or IMERG. Every 30 minutes, IMERG generates a new global map with a resolution of 10 kilometers by 10 km (6.2 miles by 6.2 mi), about the size of a small suburb. These comprehensive maps allow scientists to observe changes in precipitation patterns across 87 percent of the globe and through time.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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GPM's Rainfall Rate Analysis for Quang

Published on May 5, 2015
The rainfall accumulation analysis above was computed from data generated by the Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) during the period from April 28 to May 3, 2015. Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

Tony De La Rosa

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