Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 452176 times)

Offline vyoma

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Few updates on ISRO MOM:
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The orbiter “is in a parabolic trajectory around the sun towards Mars” said Deviprasad Karnik, ISRO spokesperson. The spacecraft had to be “seen” continuously, that is, it should be monitored all the time. So ground controllers from ISTRAC and IDSN were communicating with it.
 
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/mars-orbiter-well-on-its-way/article5471052.ece
I really hope it's in an elliptical trajectory, not a parabolic one


Yes, spacecraft is in an elliptical trajectory around Sun. Here's a snippet from mission website:
http://www.isro.org/mars/navigation.aspx
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The last manoeuver, termed as Trans Mars Injection (TMI), moved the spacecraft in the Mars Transfer Trajectory (MTT). Spacecraft crosses Earth’s Sphere of Influence (SOI) and enters heliocentric elliptic cruise phase.

http://www.isro.org/mars/mission-profile.aspx
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2.   Helio Centric Phase
The spacecraft leaves Earth in a direction tangential to Earth’s orbit and encounters Mars tangentially to its orbit. The flight path is roughly one half of an ellipse around sun. Eventually it will intersect the orbit of Mars at the exact moment when Mars is there too.

Offline antriksh

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1. Mars Orbiter, which is currently at a distance of 60 lakh kilometers from Earth, has so far burnt about 55 per cent (470 kg) of the 850 kilograms of fuel it is carrying.

2. ISRO did not overspent fuel,despite the glitch that it encountered during the fourth burn.

3. About 200 kg of fuel will be burnt in a matter of 28 minutes on September 24, 2014, during the Mars Orbit Injection phase. About 190 kgs of fuel was spent on Tran-Mars Injection phase on December 1.

4. Ceramic Servo Accelerometer (CSA) that measures the precise amount of velocity the satellite gains when the thrusters are burnt have "enabled in preserving the fuel on-board.

5.  MOM is currently travelling at a speed of 3.4 km/s through space. By the time it reaches Mars, it will attain a velocity of 34 km/s.

6.  ISRO currently communicating with MOM using the on-board medium gain antenna.


http://www.indianexpress.com/news/mars-orbiter-spent-55--of-the-total-fuel-so-far-isro-scientist/1209273/0
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline AJA

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2. ISRO did not overspent fuel,despite the glitch that it encountered during the fourth burn.

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/mars-orbiter-spent-55--of-the-total-fuel-so-far-isro-scientist/1209273/0


IANAE..but it seems to me that the glitch, and the splitting of one burn into two.... would've actually SAVED fuel. The Oberth effect. It's the same logic as to why they had multiple orbit raising manoeuvres, instead of one big burn in the first place.


Yes, a premature cut-off would've resulted in a different-from-planned argument of apogee/perigee - but given it wasn't the escape burn, and that they were still in Earth orbit, a change of burn time of the subsequent burn would've compensated.

I assume other engineering considerations would've led to them deciding on the nominal number of orbit-raising burns. (Engine re-starts, time spent in Earth orbit, thermal environment etc. etc., and of course, TMI window)
« Last Edit: 12/19/2013 08:52 AM by AJA »

Offline chota

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Here is the offical isro facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/isroofficial

Official twitter page
https://twitter.com/isroofficial
« Last Edit: 12/19/2013 11:03 AM by chota »

Offline akula2

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It's clear that a fair number of people were confused by those unofficial accounts. I saw BBC quote the Mangalyaan1 twitter as if it were an official source, for example.

Clarifying which accounts are actually controlled by ISRO does not go "against the spirit of sharing knowledge", it helps people evaluate the sources.

Fan accounts are great, but it's in everyone's interest to distinguish them from actual sources inside the mission. This situation only arose because some of the unofficial accounts were (whether intentionally or not) easily mistaken for an official account. NASA has also gone after fan accounts which they thought were easily confused with official ones.
Perhaps it's true on few cases but largely there is no harm in having several complimentary handles which serve more articles, updates, information and pictures:

@MarsCuriosity @MSL_101 @MarsWxReport

Anyway, let's all pray MOM delivers a great mission with 100% success  :)

Offline ss1_3

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Why PSLV was chosen over GSLV?

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“Coasting phase – where spacecraft travels on the velocity of the earlier burn – is not possible in GSLV. It is allowed only in PSLV. The other thing is that we already have had success in Chandrayaan when transfer orbit was possible. PSLV also saves fuel,” he said.

“Argument of perigee required for Mars mission was 270 degree, point of entry and velocity required is also not possible with GSLV that would have given 170 degree. Therefore, PSLV was selected as the launch vehicle,” he added.

http://www.dnaindia.com/ahmedabad/report-55l-km-away-stars-guide-mom-towards-red-planet-as-kirankumar-1937681

Looks like the GSLV, in it's present configuration, isn't favourable for interplanetary missions.

Offline vyoma

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Here's an insightful interview with ISRO chairman:
http://forbesindia.com/article/the-big-questions-for-2014/what-questions-will-isros-mission-answer/36789/1

Some highlights:
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Mangalyaan’s new fault detection and reconfiguration systems can do it on their own.
If problems come up in a near-earth spacecraft, we send it into ‘safe’ mode from our ground stations. But Mangalyaan can get into safe mode by itself, turning its antennae towards the earth, to receive commands, and its solar panels towards the sun, for energy.

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A series of commands are stored in the craft’s tele-command processor which activate its five instruments or payloads. But in case we require a new sequence of operations, there’s scope for that as well.

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We’ve taken instruments that were made in India; no instrument was left behind for want of space. Can these instruments be tweaked to get more or varied information, as ongoing missions, like Nasa’s Curiosity Rover, can? No, the capabilities are fixed. But what can certainly be tweaked is where they make observations and how many more of those they make.

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The commercial market has shown confidence in PSLV, which can do versatile launches. We have a French and a German satellite launch commissioned on PSLV and three UK satellites of 350-kg each will be launched using this rocket.

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I think such missions also inspire the younger generation. In 2006, Isro received 24,000 applications for 268 positions. In 2009, post Chandrayaan-1, we received 140,000 applications for 371 seats. In 2012, we received 120,000 applications for just 22 posts!

Offline vyoma

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Update from ISRO MOM Facebook page:
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Mission Update: MOM

As on today Mars Orbiter is almost 11.04 Million km away from planet Earth, a signal from ground control station is taking almost 36.8 seconds to reach MoM... Usain Bolt would have run 345 m in that much time...

Offline antriksh

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ISROMOM Facebook update

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Another 233 days for MOM to reach Mars. MOM is 14.4 million km away from earth and moving at a velocity of 31.3 km/s with respect to Sun. As of now; a signal traveling at the speed of light takes around 48 seconds to reach MOM.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline antriksh

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Mission Update: MOM

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MOM is now about 15 million km away from Earth. It now takes almost 2 minutes for a communication signal to go to MOM and come back, about the same time mom takes to make noodles !
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline vyoma

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ISRO MOM completes 100 days in space:
http://www.isro.org/pressrelease/scripts/pressreleasein.aspx?Feb11_2014
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Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, India's first interplanetary probe, was launched by PSLV-C25 at 1438 hours on November 5, 2013 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota. In its voyage towards Mars, the mission successfully completes 100 days in space tomorrow (February 12, 2014).

Spacecraft health:
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The spacecraft health is normal. The spacecraft is continuously monitored by the ground station of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC), located at Byalalu, near Bangalore. Except for a 40 minute break in the Telemetry data received from the spacecraft to the ground station, data has been continuously available for all the 100 days.

Payload health:
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On February 6, 2014, all the five payloads on Mars Orbiter spacecraft were switched 'ON' to check their health.

Distance:
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The health parameters of all the payloads are normal. Presently, the spacecraft is at a radio distance of 16 million km causing a one way communication delay of approximately 55 seconds. After travelling the remaining distance of about 490 million km over the next 210 days, the spacecraft would be inserted into the Martian Orbit on September 24, 2014.

Offline antriksh

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MARS COLOR CAMERA ONBOARD MARS ORBITER MISSION: SCIENTIFIC OBJECTIVES &
EARTH IMAGING RESULTS
http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2014/pdf/2449.pdf
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda



Offline Blackstar

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Somewhat related, this article http://www.business-standard.com/article/opinion/pavan-srinath-running-the-space-marathon-113121500647_1.html suggests that the oft-quoted $75 million isn't the whole story.

Thanks for that. It confirms what I have long suspected, which is that the $75 million number was bogus. It does not include salaries!

I believe that I read somewhere that the 18-month timeframe is also a lie, and that preliminary work on the mission started several years earlier.

ISRO has always had an incentive to lowball this project publicly. They want to avoid being criticized for spending money on a "frivolous" Mars mission when people are starving. So they get around that by saying that they didn't spend a lot of money, and they did it fast, and aren't they great? And then they bask in the glow from comparing it to the crazy expensive NASA MAVEN mission. They're heroes!

That's not to say that this is an expensive mission, but we should be pretty skeptical of these claims.

Offline Blackstar

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To Mars on a budget

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/18/business/international/from-india-proof-that-a-trip-to-mars-doesnt-have-to-break-the-bank.html?_r=0

That article was written by a business reporter, and I take issue with a number of things it claims. For instance:

"ISRO has learned to make cost-effectiveness a daily mantra. Its inexpensive but reliable launch capabilities have become popular for the launches of small French, German and British satellites."

Not really. They've struggled with reliability.

Also, a comparison between the Indian mission and NASA's MAVEN mission is not really that appropriate. MAVEN has much more capable instruments (maybe that's what the reporter means by "heavyweight") and does different stuff.

I also think there's a big question of reliability. The reporter mentions India's Moon mission, but does not mention that it died early. He misses the fact that their rocket has been unreliable. And if this Mars mission dies on the way to Mars, will it really be a bargain? And why does he seem to imply that not conducting extensive testing of the vehicle before flight is a good thing? That's the part that would scare the heck out of any spacecraft engineer.

And I'll add one more thing: the reporter really misunderstood the criticism and the history of India's space program. The criticism has been focused on their space exploration programs like Moon and Mars. I don't think they have been criticized over their applications programs (comsats, weather satellites, remote sensing), that go back decades. The reporter is right to note that India's space program historically has helped out the country by providing communications, meteorology, crop forecasting, telemedicine, etc. No question about that. The domestic criticism is that they should not be doing anything besides those projects with social welfare objectives.

Several years ago I heard an Indian diplomat in DC explain that one reason they were expanding into Moon and Mars missions (and human spaceflight) is because they were having difficulty recruiting engineers. This is especially difficult when the country's computer software industry is expanding rapidly. Nobody wants to go to work building the seventh copy of a weather satellite. So they say "Come work for us and you can design a Mars spacecraft!" Then, after that is built, they work on the weather satellite.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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"ISRO has learned to make cost-effectiveness a daily mantra. Its inexpensive but reliable launch capabilities have become popular for the launches of small French, German and British satellites."

Not really. They've struggled with reliability.

Its a mixed bag. The GSLV has been unreliable (three failures and two partial failures out of 8 launches). The PSLV which launched MOM has been quite reliable. PSLV has had 21 successful consecutive launches since a partial failure in 1997 (one failure and one partial failure out of 25 launches). That is what I believe the reporter was referring to.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline vyoma

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Second trajectory correction may happen on 9th April:
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“The second of the four trajectory correction manoeuvres will be made, probably on April 9, to make minor changes that may be required owing to the solar radiation pressure on the spacecraft,”

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Tiruchirapalli/health-parameters-of-mars-orbiter-are-normal/article5742711.ece
« Last Edit: 03/02/2014 11:52 AM by vyoma »

Offline Gaganaut

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Mars Orbiter Mission 200 days away from reaching destination

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news-feed/science/200-days-for-mangalyaan-to-get-into-mars-orbit/article1-1192345.aspx

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If everything goes as planned, MOM will get inserted into its Martian orbit, exactly 200 days from 7th March

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A senior official of Isro told HT: The spacecraft  is  absolutely healthy, on track  and continuously being  monitored. We are getting data from the Spacecraft Control Centre at Isro Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network in Bangaluru beside the three ground stations of Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Madrid, Goldstone (California) and Canberra

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Maintaining that the next challenge for the scientists would come on September 24, when the spacecraft will have to be energized  after a hibernation of 9 months, he said: “ The firing at that time will last for nearly 1500 seconds. The Mars Orbiter Insertion would be a major challenge for us but we have done a lot of ground simulation for that.”

Offline vyoma

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Second trajectory correction manouvre (planned to be done on April 9th) will be skipped:
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Updating on the status of Isro's Mars Mission, launched last November, Kiran Kumar said, "Right now MOM is 35 million km away. We are regularly checking the health of the satellite and it is satisfactory."

He also said the second of the four trajectory correction manouvre (TCM) planned on the Mars Mission was not necessary and the next TCM was being planned in June. The mission is expected to reach the Mars orbit by September 24.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/science/Isro-sets-eyes-on-stars-plans-a-mini-Hubble/articleshow/33247231.cms

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