Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 453982 times)

Offline vyoma

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Here's the official update from ISRO MOM Facebook page, about next maneuver:
Quote
Tonight is going to be the culmination of the various baby steps MOM has been taking by gradually soaring to higher apogees around Mother Earth. This manoeuver, scheduled at 01:27 hrs IST, will take the spacecraft to - almost half the way to moon - about two lakh kilometers [200,000 km].

Offline cave_dweller

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It is really very interesting how ISRO has gone about this mission. It has certainly made me think about the subject in a more comprehensive manner than before.

While not trivializing any aspect of rocketry and satellite navigation, this approach also helped demystify the subject and made me even more curious about science & technology. And I am just an enthusiast. If this mission has managed to inspire 100 smart students (which I am sure it already did), this mission is already a success!! Way to go and really impressive!

The 400N LAM engine uses hypergolic fuel (Monomethylhydrazine fuel and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen). Is this a commonly used fuel for on board satellite navigation motors? Are there other fuels that offer similar performance/benefit profile? Could ISRO instead have used other fuels?

Does anyone know how much fuel a craft has to burn to attain a certain amount of velocity?
How much weight does fuel and associated storage and delivery mechanisms contribute to the overall weight of the craft?

Thinking wildly here .. would it be possible to "throw" MOM over to Jupiter and further if and when the Mars mission is completed? (assuming there is enough fuel to navigate/control attitude/altitude)

Or how about to Venus? By hopping off Earth's and Sun gravity?

Your insight would be appreciated!






Online plutogno

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latest facebook update

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440N Liquid Engine completed firing successfully to raise the apogee to about 1.92 lakh km in this 5th Manoeuver

Offline sdsds

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The 400N LAM engine uses hypergolic fuel (Monomethylhydrazine fuel and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen). Is this a commonly used fuel for on board satellite navigation motors? Are there other fuels that offer similar performance/benefit profile? Could ISRO instead have used other fuels?

Yes MMH/MON is a common propellant combination. Yes, there are alternatives. ISRO undoubtedly chose this option because it is a tried-and-true technology with which they have deep familiarity.


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Does anyone know how much fuel a craft has to burn to attain a certain amount of velocity?

This question is answered by the Rocket Equation, often also called the Tsiolkovsky rocket equation.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsiolkovsky_rocket_equation

according to http://www.zarya.info/Calendar.php the perigee will be further reduced in tonight's burn

latest facebook update

Quote
440N Liquid Engine completed firing successfully to raise the apogee to about 1.92 lakh km in this 5th Manoeuver

An apogee at 192000 km is not consistent with an orbital period of 91.25 hours (as reported at zarya.info) unless the perigee is raised to 1050 km. What am I missing?
-- sdsds --

Online plutogno

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from the apogee distance of 192874 km reported here http://www.isro.org/mars/updates.aspx and a perigee distance of 250 km I get a period of 91.3 hours

Offline Comga

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It is really very interesting how ISRO has gone about this mission. It has certainly made me think about the subject in a more comprehensive manner than before.

While not trivializing any aspect of rocketry and satellite navigation, this approach also helped demystify the subject and made me even more curious about science & technology. And I am just an enthusiast. If this mission has managed to inspire 100 smart students (which I am sure it already did), this mission is already a success!! Way to go and really impressive!

The 400N LAM engine uses hypergolic fuel (Monomethylhydrazine fuel and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen). Is this a commonly used fuel for on board satellite navigation motors? Are there other fuels that offer similar performance/benefit profile? Could ISRO instead have used other fuels?

Does anyone know how much fuel a craft has to burn to attain a certain amount of velocity?
How much weight does fuel and associated storage and delivery mechanisms contribute to the overall weight of the craft?

Thinking wildly here .. would it be possible to "throw" MOM over to Jupiter and further if and when the Mars mission is completed? (assuming there is enough fuel to navigate/control attitude/altitude)

Or how about to Venus? By hopping off Earth's and Sun gravity?

Your insight would be appreciated!

Welcome
If you really want the fuel load and burn details read back page by page. It's all there in great detail not so long ago.

Those are indeed wild ideas. Wild to the point of silly. The solar system is an enormous structure. Spacecraft are built for specific purposes. Flitting about is pointless and impractical, most likely impossible. Plus there were already discussions of slightly less-than-impossible ideas like aero-braking for extended missions.

As it stands our Indian colleagues are doing remarkable things incredibly fast on extremely lean budgets. These are stellar and thoroughly admirable accomplisments.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline vyoma

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Updates on burn time, velocity boost and observed change in apogee, from ISRO MOM Facebook page:
Quote
The fifth orbit raising Manoeuver of ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission Spacecraft, starting at 01:27 hrs (IST) on Nov 16, 2013, with a burn Time of 243 seconds, and incremental velocity of 101.55 m/s has been successfully completed.The observed change in Apogee is from 118642 km to 192874 km.

Attaching data collected from http://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=39370, as on Nov 16th.
« Last Edit: 11/16/2013 03:01 AM by vyoma »

Offline cave_dweller

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It is really very interesting how ISRO has gone about this mission. It has certainly made me think about the subject in a more comprehensive manner than before.

While not trivializing any aspect of rocketry and satellite navigation, this approach also helped demystify the subject and made me even more curious about science & technology. And I am just an enthusiast. If this mission has managed to inspire 100 smart students (which I am sure it already did), this mission is already a success!! Way to go and really impressive!

The 400N LAM engine uses hypergolic fuel (Monomethylhydrazine fuel and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen). Is this a commonly used fuel for on board satellite navigation motors? Are there other fuels that offer similar performance/benefit profile? Could ISRO instead have used other fuels?

Does anyone know how much fuel a craft has to burn to attain a certain amount of velocity?
How much weight does fuel and associated storage and delivery mechanisms contribute to the overall weight of the craft?

Thinking wildly here .. would it be possible to "throw" MOM over to Jupiter and further if and when the Mars mission is completed? (assuming there is enough fuel to navigate/control attitude/altitude)

Or how about to Venus? By hopping off Earth's and Sun gravity?

Your insight would be appreciated!

Welcome
If you really want the fuel load and burn details read back page by page. It's all there in great detail not so long ago.

Those are indeed wild ideas. Wild to the point of silly. The solar system is an enormous structure. Spacecraft are built for specific purposes. Flitting about is pointless and impractical, most likely impossible. Plus there were already discussions of slightly less-than-impossible ideas like aero-braking for extended missions.

As it stands our Indian colleagues are doing remarkable things incredibly fast on extremely lean budgets. These are stellar and thoroughly admirable accomplisments.

Pardon my naivete. I was under the impression if a craft can be maneuvered to transfer orbits using velocity and apogee, assuming there is enough fuel, I wondered if it would be possible to transfer a craft in Martian orbit to a helio centric orbit and then eventually on to another orbit ...

Since Mars has weaker gravity, my guess is that it should require less fuel to escape mars. Agreed the solar system is a huge space. And by that fact it would be impractical to carry and rely only on fuel for return journey from Mars (if humans ever got around to that). And if it were that it is possible to conduct a reverse hohmann transfer between mars and earth, I wondered it should be possible to then transfer to Venus using similar maneuvers.

Now, I am curious as to how a return travel from Mars would be conducted. I think I've found myself enough thoughts to be occupied for a while!





Offline input~2

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The argument of the perigee of the orbit is now 288.88°

Offline Danderman

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assuming there is enough fuel, I wondered if it would be possible to transfer a craft in Martian orbit to a helio centric orbit and then eventually on to another orbit ...

There isn't enough fuel. Or propellant.

Offline LouScheffer

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assuming there is enough fuel, I wondered if it would be possible to transfer a craft in Martian orbit to a helio centric orbit and then eventually on to another orbit ...

There isn't enough fuel. Or propellant.

It's probably barely possible, but would requires a craft built just for this mission, consisting of almost all fuel and very little payload.   The Dawn mission has done exactly this to visit two asteroids, but to do so it had to use ion engines, and asteroids have much smaller gravity wells than Mars.

Offline sanman

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I thought that with an elongated Mars orbit, that this would make it easier for MOM to escape Mars gravity for other nearby targets. Wolfram Alpha says the distance between Mars and the asteroid belt is about 1.6 AU, or 2.4 x 10^8 km. It also says that the distance between Mars and Jupiter's Trojan Asteroids is 2.5 AU, or 3.8 x 10^8 km.

Here is a list of asteroids which pass closest to Mars:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Mars-crossing_minor_planets

Not sure if it might be possible to take advantage of some useful orbital timing to visit one of these other objects.

Offline ss1_3

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If there's surplus fuel left,  they would most likely attempt settling s/c in a lower orbit and do more useful science, something they otherwise can't do because of launch vehicle limitation. This might even help them to go for close flybys of Martian moons. Considering this is their maiden mission to Mars, I don't see them attempting over ambitious feats.

Offline AJA

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I've moaned about this before, but the MAVEN launch has stoked me again. Why did we use tracking ships, and settle for a 10 min LOS, and a delayed launch, instead of requesting TDRS support? Don't tell me the former was actually cheaper...

Offline seshagirib

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The argument of the perigee of the orbit is now 288.88°
At launch it was ~282.752° , any idea if this change is good ( as per mission plan) or an anamoly?
« Last Edit: 11/19/2013 03:10 PM by seshagirib »

Offline vyoma

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Here's an interview with ISRO chief, which has pretty detailed info on spacecraft operations and technicalities:
http://thehindu.com/opinion/interview/mars-orbiter-tests-have-shown-our-ability-to-predict-isro-chairman/article5372129.ece

Offline ss1_3

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MOM sends a postcard!!

First ever pic of Earth taken by Mars Color Camera. More on MOM FB page.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/ISROs-Mars-Orbiter-Mission/1384015488503058
« Last Edit: 11/20/2013 02:27 PM by ss1_3 »

Offline antriksh

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MOM sends a postcard!!

First ever pic of Earth taken by Mars Color Camera. More on MOM FB page.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/ISROs-Mars-Orbiter-Mission/1384015488503058

First ever colored shots by an Indian spacecraft!!!! 8)

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Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline Borklund

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Congratulations India and the ISRO :) I look forward to seeing pictures of Mars next year, fingers crossed!

Offline antriksh

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Why 2013?

He said doing it January 2016 would be costlier for any agency. “The speed to be given to the spacecraft now is 2.5 km per second; in 2016 it would be 3.6 km per second and would need higher propulsion and lighter payloads” than the current 15 kg.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/mom-maven-a-tale-of-2-mars-orbiters/article5370153.ece
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

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