Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 452637 times)

Offline antriksh

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^ not clear if this includes fuel for breaking into mars orbit....

Yeah, I didn't account for that. So also considering the MOI burn, perhaps roughly 50-100 kgs will be left.

This article says that their nominal objective is to use 800 kg of fuel for completing the mission, and they've kept 50 kg in reserve for any unplanned corrective maneuvers required:

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/367441/saving-fuel-critical-mars-mission.html

If by some miracle everything were to go perfectly and that 50 kg reserve still remained, I wonder if it could be enough to fling it somewhere else? Is the asteroid belt too far?

They can try for Vesta flyby! ISRO is already planning for a mission to Vesta.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Isn't the efficiency of the perigee burn given because of the Oberth Effect?

Yes. For apogee raising or going into a hyperbolic trajectory, you want to do this during the fastest point of the trajectory, which is at perigee. Similarly, when going into orbit around another planet, you want to perform the braking burn as close to the planet as possible, but not too close as otherwise you could crash into the planet!
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 05:30 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline bad_astra

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Is 2013 even a launch window to Mars?
Very unlikely that this will launch in 2013. I'm going to say 2016 at the earliest.
I don't know why they're even claiming it would launch in 2013, hell the design isn't even finalized yet.

You were saying?
"Contact Light" -Buzz Aldrin

Offline antriksh

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Delta-v required for MTT = 1525.5 m/s
Delta-v required for MOI = 1111.5 m/s
Total propellant requirement to achieve desired orbit around Mars = 777 kg
Total propellant available on the orbiter = 852 kg
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Online jacqmans

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November 07, 2013 
 
Mars Orbiter Spacecraft's Orbit Raised
 
The first orbit-raising manoeuvre of India's Mars Orbiter Spacecraft was performed at 01:17 hrs Indian Standard Time (IST) early this morning (November 07, 2013) when the 440 Newton Liquid Engine of the spacecraft was fired for 416 seconds by commanding it from Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC) at ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Peenya, Bangalore. With this engine firing, the spacecraft's apogee (farthest point to Earth) has been raised to 28,825 km, while its perigee (nearest point to Earth) is at 252 km.

 It may be recalled that Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, India's first interplanetary spacecraft, was launched into an elliptical earth orbit with a perigee of 248.4 km and an apogee of 23,550 km, inclined at an angle of 19.27 deg to the equator by India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle in its twenty fifth flight (PSLV-C25). The achieved orbit was very close to the intended one. The launch was conducted from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota on November 05, 2013. The launch of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft occurred as scheduled from the First Launch Pad at 2:38 pm IST after a fifty six and a half hour count down.

 Following its separation from the fourth stage of PSLV-C25 about 44 minutes after lift-off, the solar panels and the main dish shaped antenna of the Mars Orbiter spacecraft got successfully deployed. Subsequently, the other intended operations to accurately stabilise the spacecraft were also performed successfully.

 All systems onboard the spacecraft are functioning normally. Further orbit raising maneuvers using the 440 Newton Liquid Engine are planned in the coming few days following which the spacecraft will be put on Mars Transfer Trajectory on December 01, 2013. This enables Mars orbiter spacecraft to travel to the vicinity of Mars in September 2014 after a 300 day journey in deep space. At that time, the 440 Newton Liquid Engine is fired again to slow down the spacecraft to enable it to be captured by Martian gravity into an orbit around it.
 
 

Offline vyoma

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November 07, 2013 
 
Mars Orbiter Spacecraft's Orbit Raised
 
The first orbit-raising manoeuvre of India's Mars Orbiter Spacecraft was performed at 01:17 hrs Indian Standard Time (IST) early this morning (November 07, 2013) when the 440 Newton Liquid Engine of the spacecraft was fired for 416 seconds by commanding it from Spacecraft Control Centre (SCC) at ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Peenya, Bangalore. With this engine firing, the spacecraft's apogee (farthest point to Earth) has been raised to 28,825 km, while its perigee (nearest point to Earth) is at 252 km.

I remember reading earlier that LAM will be fired for 200 seconds to raise apogee to 28K km. Now, they've fired it for 416 seconds. Is this something to be concerned about? Any idea how much fuel was used up?


Earlier report:
http://gadgets.ndtv.com/others/news/isro-gearing-up-to-raise-orbit-of-mars-orbiter-mission-mangalyaan-442358
Quote
"Early tomorrow (Thursday) at 1.17 a.m. the on-board motors of Mars Orbiter will be fired for around 200 seconds to raise its orbit by around 4,120 km to 28,785 km," S. Arunan, project director, Mars Orbiter Mission told IANS over phone from Bangalore Wednesday.
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 09:38 AM by vyoma »

Offline AlesH

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I remember reading earlier that LAM will be fired for 200 seconds to raise apogee to 28K km. Now, they've fired it for 416 seconds. Is this something to be concerned about? Any idea how much fuel was used up?
In my opinion were 200 seconds cited incorrectly. 416 seconds corresponds much better with engine capability (440 N thrust) as the maneuver delta-v was about 115 m/s (I assume) and the mass of the probe around 1350 kg. Fuel consumption for this maneuver is around 50 kg (according to my calculations [by Tsiolkovsky equation]).
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 12:43 PM by AlesH »

Offline vyoma

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Second orbit raising maneuver at 02:18 hrs IST, Nov 8th.

Update from ISRO MOM Facebook page:
Quote
ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission Spacecraft will use its Liquid Engine for the second time, tonight at 02:18 Hrs IST, to further boost its velocity and soar higher.

Offline sanman

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Offline sanman

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What are the expectations around solar flare activity over the period of the voyage?

As we head for solar maximum, what are the implications of that for this mission?

Anybody know what if anything ISRO has done to mitigate the risks associated with this?
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 09:42 PM by sanman »

Online Stan Black

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Quote
The second orbit raising manueour of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, starting at 02:18:51 hrs(IST) on Nov 08, 2013, with a burn time of 570.6 seconds has been successfully completed.The observed change in Apogee is from 28814 km to 40186 km.
http://www.isro.org/mars/updates.aspx

Offline Star One

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Quote
The second orbit raising manueour of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, starting at 02:18:51 hrs(IST) on Nov 08, 2013, with a burn time of 570.6 seconds has been successfully completed.The observed change in Apogee is from 28814 km to 40186 km.
http://www.isro.org/mars/updates.aspx

What is the planned maximum Apogee to be just before it leaves Earth orbit?
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 10:22 PM by Star One »

Offline cave_dweller

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Quote
The second orbit raising manueour of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, starting at 02:18:51 hrs(IST) on Nov 08, 2013, with a burn time of 570.6 seconds has been successfully completed.The observed change in Apogee is from 28814 km to 40186 km.
http://www.isro.org/mars/updates.aspx

What is the planned maximum Apogee to be just before it leaves Earth orbit?

200,000 KM / 95 hrs duration per orbit revolution

http://www.ndtv.com/video/player/news/mangalyaan-pushed-further-away-from-earth-in-midnight-operation-scientists/297072?h_also_see
« Last Edit: 11/07/2013 11:11 PM by cave_dweller »

Offline sanman

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BBC's Justin Rowlatt interviews Prof J N Goswami of PRL who is a science advisor to this mission:


Offline sdsds

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What are the expectations around solar flare activity over the period of the voyage?

As we head for solar maximum, what are the implications of that for this mission?

Anybody know what if anything ISRO has done to mitigate the risks associated with this?

Is your concern about radiation? Like Chandrayaan-1, MOM uses a MAR31750 processor for data handling. According to the spec sheet the "R" in the part number indicates a "100 kRads (Si) Guaranteed Radiation Tolerance." (Whatever that means.)

-- sdsds --

Offline cave_dweller

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What are the expectations around solar flare activity over the period of the voyage?

As we head for solar maximum, what are the implications of that for this mission?

Anybody know what if anything ISRO has done to mitigate the risks associated with this?

Is your concern about radiation? Like Chandrayaan-1, MOM uses a MAR31750 processor for data handling. According to the spec sheet the "R" in the part number indicates a "100 kRads (Si) Guaranteed Radiation Tolerance." (Whatever that means.)



http://www.q-tech.com/radiation.html
http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/llis/0824.html

« Last Edit: 11/08/2013 03:26 PM by cave_dweller »

Offline vyoma

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Attaching the details about apogee and perigee of MOM as on Nov 8th. Apogee has been raised from 28,733  km to 40,016 km.
(source: http://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=39370)
« Last Edit: 12/02/2013 06:52 AM by input~2 »

Offline vyoma

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Update about tonight's (02:10 IST, Nov 9) orbit raising manoeuver, from ISRO MOM Facebook page:
Quote
MOMís Midnight Manoeuvers !

Tonight we have scheduled the largest leap by ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission Spacecraft so far. After raising its apogee to 30 thousand km and 40 thousand km respectively in the last two Midnight Manoeuvers, MOM is all set to gallop to an apogee of 70 thousand km in tonightís firing of its Liquid engine scheduled at 02:10 Hrs IST.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/ISROs-Mars-Orbiter-Mission/1384015488503058
« Last Edit: 11/08/2013 04:04 PM by vyoma »

Offline AlesH

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09-11-2013 The third orbit raising manoeuvre of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft, starting at 02:10:43 hrs(IST) on Nov 09, 2013, with a burn time of 707 seconds has been successfully completed. The observed change in Apogee is from 40186km to 71636km

http://www.isro.org/mars/updates.aspx

Offline vyoma

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Attaching the details about apogee and perigee of MOM as on Nov 9th. Apogee has been raised from 40,016 km to 71,159 km.
(source: http://www.n2yo.com/satellite/?s=39370)
« Last Edit: 12/02/2013 06:51 AM by input~2 »

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