Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 454455 times)

Offline antriksh

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There was a discussion about PAM-G, cryogenic engine restart capability and how Centaur upper stage does it, in one of the GSLV discussion threads. You may find it interesting:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=33622.msg1148624#msg1148624

Thanks vyoma! I vaguely remember reading these posts sometime back, but then later forgot the forum. Its quite informative. :)

Even if we use PAM-G, payload and mission life would be much more than what can be achieved using PSLV.

Ok.. So the Mars payloads you quoted in one of your earlier posts (1000kg for elliptical and 550kg for circular orbits), are they applicable when using PAM-G? What are the other solutions ISRO can consider for Mars missions using GSLV-II (barring, of course, the restartable cryo-stage) ?

Yes those payloads account for PAM-G. I don't see any other mature option in the coming decade.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline antriksh

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The Methane Problem on Mars

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The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) has a methane sensor, based on Fabry-Perot etalon, which can measure the CH4 at several ppb levels (Goswami et al, 2013). Detailed measurements of methane levels in the atmosphere over long periods from an orbiting platform would definitely answer some of the pertinent questions regarding the Martian methane.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

New image showing the Elysium

Offline vineethgk

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New image showing the Elysium

Cool.. Thanks man..  8)

Looks like this image was less 'photoshopped' than the last time? A little less reddish, and less visible artifacts. The northern dust storm is raging still, or is the whitish thing on top just the polar ice cap?
« Last Edit: 10/07/2014 05:42 PM by vineethgk »

Offline Dalhousie

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Ok.. So the Mars payloads you quoted in one of your earlier posts (1000kg for elliptical and 550kg for circular orbits), are they applicable when using PAM-G? What are the other solutions ISRO can consider for Mars missions using GSLV-II (barring, of course, the restartable cryo-stage) ?

Indian Space Policy wise, you can spin the first mission of every kind as a technology demonstrator, but the next one is going to have to be a service carrying some foreign science payload. I think most other agencies are maxed out on their Mars budgets right about now. So... I'd rather the second Mangalyaan... if there is indeed going to be one in 2018 -  be our first foray into ion-engines (on the Earth end), and aero-braking (at Mars).

While certainly there should be openings for international payloads, what makes you think that idia can't develop useful instruments itself?  Indeed, what makes you think that MOM's payload isn't useful now?
« Last Edit: 10/08/2014 11:52 PM by Dalhousie »
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline AJA

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While certainly there should be openings for ionternational payloads, what makes you think that idia can't develop useful instruments itself?  Indeed, what makes you think that MOM's payload isn't useful now?

I didn't mean to say that we can't build useful instruments, or that Mangalyaan's are useless. I'm aware of the huge heritage and competence we have in Remote sensing. I was talking about inadequate managerial/political support to fundamental research programs. Mangalyaan was always a showcase mission. It was applied research, where the "application" was to bring in foreign exchange by portraying India as technologically capable of pulling off an inter-planetary mission.

Indeed, they don't even expect this investment to flow to ISRO. This mission is to sway CEOs & boardrooms of companies (across all sectors), to convince people who have been sitting on the fences, to take that leap of faith and exploit leverage the highly skilled, English speaking, yet cheap labour market in India
« Last Edit: 10/08/2014 10:31 AM by AJA »

Offline vyoma

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http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/indore/crossing-in-indore-to-be-named-after-mars-mission/article1-1273049.aspx

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To commemorate Indian Space Research Organisationís (ISRO) Mars Orbiter Missionís (MOM) grand success and with a view to make coming generation aware about the milestone, Indore Development Authority (IDA) is going to rename an intersection at Super Corridor near Indore Airport as Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) roundabout.

"This is for the first time that we are dedicating a crossing to our scientists and the intersection would be renamed "Mars Crossing" or "Mangal Chouraha," he said and added that "The crossing will display a mars shaped ball installed over a red pillar with a message ĎIn honour of successful mars missioní along with details about MOM."

:)

Offline antriksh

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MOM to observe Mars's 'close encounter' with comet

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The space agency moved MOM to a "safer position" on Tuesday to avoid any damage to its payloads from the comet's debris. Tuesday's manoeuvre which consumed 1.9 kg of fuel will put the spacecraft at an approximate distance of 1,40,000km from the comet when it flies by. Kumar said MOM was now 400km away from the surface of the Red Planet on the opposite side of the comet.

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The spacecraft will carry out observations of the comet and even capture it on its Mars Colour Camera. The duration between the comet's arrival and departure on October 19 will be approximately one-and-a-half hours.

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MOM's payload Methane Sensor for Mars will check for presence of Methane on Siding Spring, which is travelling at a velocity of 56km/second relative to the planet
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline seshagirib

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Why is propellant expenditure a limiting factor for life of MOM ( or any other probe / sat. which has achieved orbit ) ? Is it not possible to have attitude control using the reaction control wheels only, as long as solar / battery power is available ?
« Last Edit: 10/10/2014 05:44 PM by seshagirib »

Online plutogno

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Is it not possible to have attitude control using the reaction control wheels only as long as solar / battery power is available ?

nope. reaction wheels become less and less effective as their rpm increases. so you need to spin them down ("desaturate") from time to time and in these cases you need to control the orientation using jets.
in Earth's orbit you can desaturate reaction wheels using magnetic coils interacting with the Earth's magnetic field as is done on Hubble (which has no propulsion system), but you can't do that in Mars orbit or in deep space.

Offline seshagirib

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in Earth's orbit you can desaturate reaction wheels using magnetic coils interacting with the Earth's magnetic field as is done on Hubble (which has no propulsion system), but you can't do that in Mars orbit or in deep space.

Why is this not used for all of the Sats. in Earth orbit? and for planets with a magnetic field?
Thank you! for the explanation.
« Last Edit: 10/10/2014 06:01 PM by seshagirib »

Offline ss1_3

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in Earth's orbit you can desaturate reaction wheels using magnetic coils interacting with the Earth's magnetic field as is done on Hubble (which has no propulsion system), but you can't do that in Mars orbit or in deep space.

Why is this not used for all of the Sats. in Earth orbit? and for planets with a magnetic field?
Thank you! for the explanation.

Reaction wheels would also incur extra mass penalty and are prone to failures over longer mission durations. Further, propellant may also be required for periodic orbit corrections to account for perturbations out of drag and oblateness of the planet.

Offline hop

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Reaction wheels would also incur extra mass penalty and are prone to failures over longer mission durations.
AFAIK MOM uses both, like most planetary spacecraft. Desaturating occasionally is more efficient than doing everything with thrusters, and reaction wheels are generally better for fine control.


Offline ss1_3

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Some of the unreleased and raw images from a by Director - SAC, ISRO at IIT Gandhinagar. These are all screen grabs, so no high quality here. Please enjoy!
« Last Edit: 10/12/2014 08:05 AM by ss1_3 »

Offline ss1_3

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« Last Edit: 10/12/2014 08:02 AM by ss1_3 »

Offline ss1_3

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In the second last image, Phobos (encircled) transit over Mars was captured.

Offline vineethgk

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In the second last image, Phobos (encircled) transit over Mars was captured.
Nice find, thanks..  8)

The image with Phobos seem to show the same Elysium region as in the previous image that was made public, but taken from a a slightly different position. No sign of Phobos in the published one though, so this might be a new set taken recently. I wish they publish multiple images of this set to show us mortals how that dark patch moved relative to the Mars disc..  :) Phobos moves relatively fast in the Martian sky, doesn't it? ( EDIT: Just watched the video, they do have the motion captured in consecutive photos, and it is the shadow of the moon on the Martian surface, not the moon itself)

The images shown for Oct 1st and Oct 4th coverages kind of fill the gaps for the earlier two global views that were made public, but is unpublished as yet.
« Last Edit: 10/13/2014 02:37 PM by vineethgk »

Offline antriksh

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MOM gears up for comet fly-by

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ISRO engineers handling MOM from the command centre at Bangalore have been trying to balance MOMís safety with the visual treat the fly-by promises, according to MOM Mission director V. Kesava Raju. For the October 20 encounter, the 25-plus team of engineers associated with the five MOM instruments were working out the best position for the instruments.


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Opportunities to take pictures of the comet and its tail during October 19 Ė 21 are also under discussion. Post-encounter, the key concern would be to protect MOMís body from exposure to the large cloud of dust.
« Last Edit: 10/14/2014 03:30 AM by antriksh »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline antriksh

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Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline sanman

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Here you go - animated GIF format:


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