Author Topic: ISRO Mars Orbiter Mission - Nov 2013 launch to September 2014 arrival - UPDATES  (Read 436169 times)

Offline antriksh

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First picture is here :)



Some info[/url] on this picture:
Quote
ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
Taken from a height of 7.3 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.

7.3 km??  :P wth? zooming?

They corrected now. It's 7300 km ;D

lol! Ye Dil mange more!!
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline atnanda

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Offline vineethgk

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Would love to see the photo from Apoapsis of the whole planet. That would be the most stunning..  8)

Offline AJA

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Syrtis major? As the "first light" (well, of Mars atleast) image? Hahaha. That is brilliant. Someone at ISRO knows their space history.

a)
Quote from: Wikipedia article for Syrtis Major Planum
Syrtis Major was the first documented surface feature of another planet. It was discovered by Christiaan Huygens, who included it in a drawing of Mars in 1659. He used repeated observations of the feature to estimate the length of day on Mars.

b) Look at the Martian latitude/longitude co-ordinates for Syrtis Major (8.4N, 69.5E), and then look where the same latitude/longitude would put you on Earth. Clever ISRO, very very clever. :D

Seriously, the timing of all the events has seemed to work out really well. MOI early in the Indian morning, before people go to work - which no doubt helped amplify the effect of the PM's address... and now this. (EDIT: And apparently it's Satish Dhawan's birthday today. Talk about gifts. :D)

Some info on this picture:
Quote
ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission captures its first image of Mars.
Taken from a height of 7300 km; with 376 m spatial resolution.

Height as in above the Martian surface, measured from nadir? 7300 km is greater than Mars' diameter! The geometry of that makes me think they should've been able to get a full-disk image. Why do we have only this bit? Anyone know what the camera's usable Angle-of-View is (corresponding to full sensor area)? Anything >= 50 degrees x 50 degrees would've allowed imagery of the whole disk...

Wowww... Thanks.. The lower right corner gives me the impression that this has been taken at the periapsis at very high speed. Doesn't the camera have something like an image stabilization?

Nah.. motion blur would be uniform. For ALL Mars features. Those streaks are a feature of Syrtis Major.

So, Big Boss gets to see it first.  ;)

But I don't get why they had to wait in order to show a smartphone and twitter savvy big boss. Especially when they've been so good with social media. I guess they're mining public attention. Waiting for it to wane, and seize another news cycle with the release of images.

Ok. And I assume ISRO may not be planning to reduce the periapsis any further. I was wondering if they planned something of that sort since their original plan was to achieve a periapsis of 370km as against the 427 km that apparently became their new plan.

Given their fuel margin, and the criticism from the former ISRO chief, and a few other members of the scientific community regarding the orbit... how long before they consider lowering the periareion? I realise that there may not enough fuel leftover, but if they knocked the periareion down to an altitude where the orbiter experienced some appreciable drag, it'd lower itself. Would this, over time, be enough to lower the per-apsis considerably? I think we get a little "free" braking from Siding Spring's coma too.

MAVEN's expected EOM involves burn-up on re-entry, and given that the Mangalyaan has lesser fuel, it probably is consigned to the same final fate? I know MAVEN's orbit takes it closer.... periareion was 150 km at capture, and now has been lowered further... but wouldn't there be significant drag all the way out near Mangalyaan's orbit? Especially with Mars' weaker gravity, and atmospheric escape? I haven't found numbers yet.
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 07:10 AM by AJA »

Offline vineethgk

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Wowww... Thanks.. The lower right corner gives me the impression that this has been taken at the periapsis at very high speed. Doesn't the camera have something like an image stabilization?

Nah.. motion blur would be uniform. For ALL Mars features. Those streaks are a feature of Syrtis Major.


My bad.. It looked so much like motion blur to me.  :-\

Cross-checked now about these features in Syrtis Major Planum. Seems to be due to wind. Thanks AJA!
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 07:14 AM by vineethgk »

Offline vyoma

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Offline hop

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Why do we have only this bit? Anyone know what the camera's usable Angle-of-View is (corresponding to full sensor area)? Anything >= 50 degrees x 50 degrees would've allowed imagery of the whole disk...
It's much smaller, resolution at periapsis is stated as ~25m/pixel (http://www.spaceflight101.com/mars-orbiter-mission.html) The sensor is 2k square.

Offline AJA

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http://www.thenewsminute.com/lives/311

Yeah, but they'll demand 900 crores to go to Mars. Why? Because they won't get a return fare

To the world space community: Can we PLEASE start work on sample return already? Not a(nother) study, but cutting metal. Please?

Offline antriksh

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Wowww... Thanks.. The lower right corner gives me the impression that this has been taken at the periapsis at very high speed. Doesn't the camera have something like an image stabilization?

Nah.. motion blur would be uniform. For ALL Mars features. Those streaks are a feature of Syrtis Major.

I found this image on the net showing feature of Syrtis major that you mentioned that is also present in MOM's image

« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 08:11 AM by antriksh »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline Dalhousie

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http://www.thenewsminute.com/lives/311


To the world space community: Can we PLEASE start work on sample return already? Not a(nother) study, but cutting metal. Please?

The 2020 rover is supposed to be the first step towards MSR
"There is nobody who is a bigger fan of sending robots to Mars than me... But I believe firmly that the best, the most comprehensive, the most successful exploration will be done by humans" Steve Squyres

Offline AJA

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The 2020 rover is supposed to be the first step towards MSR

Are we soothing ourselves with that now? I know the 2020 rover's caching samples... but come on. There's nothing in the pipeline to go bring them back. Is there? I'm pretty sure that most scientists would settle for any Martian rock that's lying around, rather than being picky about getting a pristine, subsurface excoriated drill core. But we digress (mea culpa).

Offline antriksh

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It seems to be a upside down snap of mars.
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 08:41 AM by antriksh »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline vineethgk

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I found this image on the net showing feature of Syrtis major that you mentioned that is also present in MOM's image


Was about to jump with joy thinking it is second image from MOM.. Darn... Feeling like a 5 yr old kid waiting for toy promised by mom (pun intended)..  :P

Offline antriksh

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I found this image on the net showing feature of Syrtis major that you mentioned that is also present in MOM's image


Was about to jump with joy thinking it is second image from MOM.. Darn... Feeling like a 5 yr old kid waiting for toy promised by mom (pun intended)..  :P

Lol sorry for that.

http://i.imgur.com/AdKvZem.png
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 10:49 AM by Chris Bergin »
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline vineethgk

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Maybe this is a slight deviation from the topic as we wait for the next images.. But I was having a lingering question in my mind. Apologies if this had already been discussed here earlier.

I was checking on Japan's maiden Mars mission, the Nozomi (which ultimately failed). It was a much smaller spacecraft (Total mass:540 kg, Dry mass: 258kg) launched on a less powerful rocket (M-V). Due to these limitations, the mission plan was to build up its velocity through both Earth and Lunar swing-bys over a period of 6 months  and then perform a final burn to Mars. But what caught my eye in this 'frugal' mission was the amount of scientific payload it carried - 33kg, more than double that of MOM ! (Source: Wikipedia)

Which brings me to the question - what were the factors that limited the payload mass in MOM to 15kg? Considering that we used a standard I-1K satellite bus, was the bus a bit over-weight for the job? Or maybe it was the greater number of redundant systems that ISRO had to build into the spacecraft to ensure success?


Offline Silmfeanor

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..image...

Please, could you attach images instead of embedding them? It happens a lot in this thread, and it breaks page layout  :'(

Also, congratulations to India for this impressive achievement!
As noted above, it's a PR victory as well, next to the scientific and technical feat.
I'm still a bit irked by the comparison regarding MAVEN price though..apples and oranges.
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 09:48 AM by Silmfeanor »

Offline Gaganaut

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MOMs first picture of Mars - I was just trying to find the location on Mars, (MOMs picture in upside-down mode).
please see the attached jpg..
« Last Edit: 09/25/2014 10:21 AM by Gaganaut »

Offline vineethgk

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MOMs first picture of Mars - I was just trying to find the location on Mars, (MOMs picture in upside-down mode).
please see the attached jpg..

Great work. Thanks..  8)

Offline antriksh

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Which brings me to the question - what were the factors that limited the payload mass in MOM to 15kg? Considering that we used a standard I-1K satellite bus, was the bus a bit over-weight for the job? Or maybe it was the greater number of redundant systems that ISRO had to build into the spacecraft to ensure success?

Initial plan was to carry 25 kg of payload, but later non-availability of some of the the instruments on schedule led to reduction of total payload to 15 kg. So some space remained unutilized on MOM.
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

Offline antriksh

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..image...

Please, could you attach images instead of embedding them? It happens a lot in this thread, and it breaks page layout  :'(

Also, congratulations to India for this impressive achievement!
As noted above, it's a PR victory as well, next to the scientific and technical feat.
I'm still a bit irked by the comparison regarding MAVEN price though..apples and oranges.

Sure!! No point in comparing MAVEN and MOM. Specs are totally different..
Nasadiya Sukta:
Srishti se pehle sat nahin thaa, asat bhi nahin | Antariksh bhi nahin, aakaash bhi nahin thaa | chhipaa thaa kyaa, kahaan, kisne dhakaa thaa | us pal to agam, atal jal bhi kahaan thaa ||

From: 1st verse of 129th Hymn of the 10th Book of Rig Veda

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